Help re Jehovah's Witness and death - page 3

Dear All Im wondering if anyone can help me with some information I need. A am writting an assignment on addressing needs of particular groups, I have chosen Jehovah's Witnesses. I am wondering... Read More

  1. by   Jerry1234
    I don't have time right now to fully address why JWs are permitted to accept organ transplants, but not blood transfusions. Just let me say that when the Watchtower Society outlawed transfusions in 1945, it also prohibited transplants -- for the obvious reason that a living organ also contains the blood of the donor.

    However, the transplant prohibition was eventually dropped in either the 1960s or 1970s -- also for obvious reasons.

    Will come back.
  2. by   twinmommy+2
    Quote from BSNtobe2009
    I can understand there being alot of controvery surrounding certain medical procedures, but blood transfusions...I can't imagine, regardless of religious beliefs, letting a child die over someone so easily fixed.
    It is the parents belief (correct me folks if I'm wrong) that if the child recieves blood products they will not enter heaven after the resurrection. The parents in this case are more worried about their childs eternal life with God than the short life they have on earth. I imagine thats a very hard stance to have but if I were in that belief system I would certainly fight hard for what I believe in. I would also fight hard for a pt's rights for their religious freedom in this matter.
  3. by   Jerry1234
    No, that is not correct. First, JWs do not believe they go to heaven, hell, or anywhere else when they die. See my earlier post. They simply believe that a person ceases to exist when they die. Later, at the biblical "resurrection", JWs believe they will be "replicated" (the new person is given the old "thought patterns" in a new body).

    JWs consider receiving a transfusion to be a "sin" only if the recipient willingly consents to such. Thus, if a court orders such, there is no "sin" on the part of the JW -- whether the JW is a baby, minor, or even in the few cases where adults were transfused against their will.

    A Moderator has told me to stop posting the link to the website which contains the ACTUAL UNITED STATES COURT DECISIONS, so I cannot do that. However, since JW Members are allowed to both post the names and links of their own JW websites, I will assume that I am allowed to at least post the name of the website which contains the ACTUAL COURT DECISIONS, and anyone interested can google for the link:


    DIVORCE, BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS, AND OTHER LEGAL ISSUES AFFECTING
    CHILDREN OF JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES


    These ACTUAL UNITED STATES COURT DECISIONS show that while JW Adults are allowed to die rather than accept a blood transfusion, JW Parents are NOT allowed to make that same decision for their children barring unusual circumstances -- which again can be learned by reading the ACTUAL UNITED STATES COURT DECISIONS.
  4. by   TXstudentRN
    I find all of this really interesting. I JUST read a very intriguing article in Nursing2007 (March issue) called "Can a bloodless surgery program work in the trauma setting?" It explained how one hospital (can't remember where) has implemented a highly successful bloodless surgery center, but that there are still issues regarding trauma. It used an example of a case of a gunshot wound a matter of years ago and how the patient died due to lack of knowledge of conserving blood - they drew ALL labs, didn't give as many fluids, and a bunch of other things like that. Then they had a case of someone today in the trauma setting that lived and explained all the bloodless interventions they use (they have a whole bloodless medicine team with a nurse (or was it NP?) running it), like increasing fluid volume, only drawing crucial labs and using peds blood tubes when doing so, and others of the same nature. It was a really good article - I highly suggest it- I learned a lot!

    It also addressed the issue as to what would happen if a minor was in need of a transfusion but the JW parents refused. In there at least it said that law would override the parents' beliefs and the child would get the transfusion. Can't remember the exact rationale but I remember thinking to myself how sticky of a situation that would be.

    Anyway, funny that I had just read that. Great thread!
  5. by   catzy5
    Quote from Cher1983
    Like the others said I dont beleive there are burial issues to deal with, its more about the blood transfusions, organ donation ect. If you do a search on google you should be able to find tonnes of info. When I was in school a JW came and talked to our class, and it was quite informative. Blood transfusions are an absolute no, and it has to do with what the bible says, try and find out that info if you can. As far as organ donation, as long as it is bloodless it is up to the individual. Another topic that would be interesting to do for an ethical debate is transfusing in an emergent situation for the child of a JW family, and the family's right to say no. There have been cases where the court has said the child has to have the transfusion and other cases where what the parents say goes. Im sure you will come up with some intersting material.

    Cher

    I wouldn't advise you to google search as there is alot of misinformation about Jw's out there. if your doing a school project I highly recomend you contact the local kingdom hall, or look up ww.Watchtower.org for official correct information. Google will have mostly misinformation available.
  6. by   catzy5
    Quote from twinmommy+1
    It is the parents belief (correct me folks if I'm wrong) that if the child recieves blood products they will not enter heaven after the resurrection. The parents in this case are more worried about their childs eternal life with God than the short life they have on earth. I imagine thats a very hard stance to have but if I were in that belief system I would certainly fight hard for what I believe in. I would also fight hard for a pt's rights for their religious freedom in this matter.

    Its scary to see anwswers to these questions from people who have no idea or any basis for their reasoning. No offense to people posting trying to add to the conversation but this is the problem that we encounter all the time. Why post answer to someone spreading more misinformation if you don't have the facts?
  7. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from Jerry1234
    Actually, in recent years, more and more older JWs, who do their own funeral/burial planning, are choosing to be cremated. Such is often due to economic reasons. Many older JWs spent their lives in the door-to-door service of the group, preaching that "Armageddon" would occur at any time. Because they never had a career, and never expected to die, they now come to the end of their lives with few economic resources. In years past, for the same reasons, JWs were discouraged from having children, so many older JWs have no children who can help with such expenses.

    This is very interesting. I was raised a Jehovah's Witness and my mother is still a practicing Witness although I am not. I have never, ever heard of JWs being discouraged from having children. In fact, it has been my experience that the "pioneers" which are the people you are speaking of above often make the decision to become full-time missionaries after making sure that they are financially secure. And the bit about never expecting to die, nuh-uh.
  8. by   reesern63
    It seems like he has an axe to grind, based on previous posts.

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