Grounds for Formal Complaint about MD?? - page 2

Okay, I'm going to TRY to state this objectively, though I am still STEAMING mad! :angryfire :angryfire My husband was booked for an angiogram last January. He wanted to cancel it, but the... Read More

  1. by   gwenith
    I agree with Tweety Jane - get it off your chest and feel better, even if nothing comes of it. Personally I think this MD has a bad case of guilts and cannot look you in the eyes.

    She done wrong -she knows it!!
  2. by   lucky928
    I am steaming mad also that you were put off time and time again.That is where I always say 1st and 2nd time maybe but there never ever should have been a 3rd time. She certainly is not focused on her job as a physician,or to her practice as a cardiologist..
    I think you even staying with the same group is a mighty big step.I know one Dr.does not make all Cardiologist bad.

    She could have offered to get him in with her partner which is what most other caring Physicians would have done. Really, most would have stayed late or come in early or squeezed him in for his very important office visit.

    But,I would do what you think you should.I bet she has more than one complaint already on her file!

    I hope he is doing well considering..
    Good Luck,
    Lucky


    STEAMING mad! :angryfire :angryfire
  3. by   dianah
    Is there an ombudsman or some neutral party who can examine your husband's experiences from before the angiogram to now, and help you sort this out? I think that's why an attorney was suggested. However, that would be an expensive route to take and you'd have to have "suit" on your mind from the get-go, because that's where the atty would take you. And for what a price!
    No, you sound like you want someone to examine the records and help identify dangerous practices and actions that resulted in real and potentially harmful delays -- and then to help PREVENT these same problems from happening to someone else. There is strong support for a case, as an injury (and not just ONE, and not just a minor one) HAS occurred (think TORT). And it sounds like it is not just the flaky Cardiologist but a questionable Urologist as well. Understandably, you are VERY emotionally involved and frankly it's hard to sort it all out being so close to it all. That's why I suggested a third party.
    I remember when you first posted about all this, after the angiogram. I am so sorry for what has happened. My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family. I'm interested in what happens, what you discover and what you decide. -- diana

    Edited to add: I don't know the Canadian medical system, either, therefore am unfamiliar with the avenues of inquiry and action. -- D
  4. by   llgRN
    you really do have some things to think about.....

    the runs of A-Fib...well it happens, and the thing to do is watch it at first...

    is your hubby on meds for his heart now?....other meds?

    one would think that with a history of stroke...he would have been watched more closely....positioned in a way that would facilitate draining out of his mouth.....

    i would not try to get the new/partner in the triangle between you and the other doc...that thing never works......i would try to talk face to face with her and let her know that you understand that she is a parent...etc..etc...and on the same hand your family has its own needs....that you rearrange your schedule to make sure you can get to the appointments and feel she is disregarding this....what ever you want to tell her/ask her....but...don't p--- her off...you might get her to apologize...that would be better....

    one more thing...I would try to get a copy of the hospital records ...charting and all and labs...xray reports...etc...then take a closer look at them...as a nurse, you will be able to see if there are anythings that seem "out of the ordinary"...litigation is not a bad thing if your husband was neglected or mistreated.....

    you dont say how old you are...but your husband being alive is part of the heritage for future generations and i am sure he would be missed if he was not around.....
  5. by   Jay-Jay
    Quote from lucky928
    I am steaming mad also that you were put off time and time again.That is where I always say 1st and 2nd time maybe but there never ever should have been a 3rd time. She certainly is not focused on her job as a physician,or to her practice as a cardiologist..
    I agree 100 percent!

    I think you even staying with the same group is a mighty big step.I know one Dr.does not make all Cardiologist bad.

    She could have offered to get him in with her partner which is what most other caring Physicians would have done. Really, most would have stayed late or come in early or squeezed him in for his very important office visit.
    She did offer to get him in with her partner. Actually, I like her partner. He was at another hospital where I used to do agency assignments, and he had a good reputation with the nurses. We live in a smallish town. We don't have much choice. I think there is one other cardiologist to choose from, and the head of the hospital's cardio dept. who is actually an internal medicine specialist. I had HIM as my specialist, and fired him for his lousy bedside manner and bad jokes. He scared the bejeesus out of me when he told me I had pulmonary hypertension, and did not explain to me the implications of it. I found that out on my own, and thought I was going to die... Typical nurse, huh, assumes the 'worst case' scenario?

    But,I would do what you think you should.I bet she has more than one complaint already on her file!
    Yes, that wouldn't surprise me one bit!
  6. by   lucky928
    Ok,I must speak up for the poor receptionist.....I understood as a receptionist that pt.was the reason I had my job and I had my share of upset pt's I did not take it personally.That comes with the job. I worked for a very busy opthamologist who saw approx. 50 + pt's a day. As the only Receptionist in the office everyday I made sure they new there were other options. Really,the Dr. himself let us know who was on call and if they were having a very severe problem I called and made the appointment myself. There is a big difference from a eye to a heart I understand, but when you are the Pt. and it is your eyesite you are in jeapordy of loosing,it might as well be your heart. That Dr.should have had other arrangements for her pt's.Even after the 1st time you should of seen her partner or another Dr.on call. She was neglectful after the 1st time.
    I agree with the idea she can not look you in the eye.Something is very wrong...
    Follow up!
    Lucky..
  7. by   jemb
    Definitely report her! Your complaint may be one of many already on file, or it may be the first of many yet to come. There is no excuse for a physician to repeatedly delay an important appointment with a patient. This wasn't a routine periodic checkup to be sure that all is still okay and the meds don't need to be changed type of thing. Your husband was seriously ill, and needed intervention/clearance before he could be treated for cancer! That is negligent IMO. If, as a nurse, I did something comparable, I'd probably be reported for abandonment of my patient!

    After all, she didn't arrange for anyone else to be available, and from what you say, was oblivious to the seriousness of the situation. As a nurse, would you 'get away' with that behavior? I don't think so. Why should a physician? :angryfire Grrrrrr!!!!!
  8. by   mimi190
    I once had to have surgery put on hold because I had an abnormal EKG....They had to find out why I had the abnormal reading...Wound up that I needed and Angiogram and later an Angioplasty along with the insertion of a stent. That was 5 years ago. I was told for both procedures that I could have a stroke and that if in the Angioplasty anything would happen I woud be pushed through OR doors and have Open Heart Surgery immediatly...A full operating room was on stand by...I was on Procrit as well as another blood thinner which they had to stop in order for the blood to cooagulate properly during surgery. I did see my Cardiologist at the follow up...and altho he was of cooler bedside manner than I liked I was told y my Family Dr that he had the same surgery and that the man was good and trust in His work. Turn your cardiologist in and move on to the another....Then I would say to you find out your rights as a patient in Canada...The USA has a bill of rights for the patients. Maybe find a friend or someone that is a family member to go with you and support you and help ask all the questions you may want answered. Maye then you may not feel so frightened as your husband has gone through so much...You should be confident in yourself that you will find Compentent Medical answers together and withthe help of others that support you. I mean this in the most sincere way possible...Not trying to tell what to do, praying to help you. Will keep you in my prayers.
  9. by   IMustBeCrazy
    Docs are bound internationally by the Hippocratic oath, correct? So bearing even that one detail in mind, (rhetorically speaking) explain to me again how by her continued appointment cancellations she was not being negligent and by default DANGEROUS with your husband's care considering his dx?

    There is one place this doc should be, and that is far far away from taking care of patients until she can get her $*** together.
  10. by   moia
    I am getting confused...you say your husband told the doc he was no longer having afib in the weeks leading up to the angio? And she just took him at his word?

    She should have known the most dangerous time in any afibbers life is when they stop afib and convert and if they go back into afib from SR. Your husband did ALL of this.

    This seems actionable to me.
    If she knew your husband was afib to SR to afib it is standard protocal to stop coumadin and admit to hospital for heparin gtt prior to angio.

    The risk of stroke when converting fromAF to Sr is pretty damn high and it is a well researched well documented fact.
    Your doctor should have known your husband became a high risk angio when he said he was no longer having AF.
    It was her obligation to protect him from stroke and she didn't do it.


    You may not like hearing "sue" the doc but your husband suffered a complication that could have been prevented.

    I guess you could complain to the college but frankly I don't think anyone there really cares if a doc cancels a few appts...in fact if she counters with a family emergency/sick child it will make you look bad not her.

    We in fact have a whole thread about nurses calling in to work and booking off because of a sick child..most say their family comes first...the doc is going to say exactly the same thing.
    Where I work a sick call could mean a patient doesn't get their heart surgery.. so I guess I think the doc has a right to cancel appts just like nurses have a right to book off.
    Your doc doesn't have the right to put you at increased risk for complications but you state in your post this doc did not have any involvement with the angio procedure..did you ask the angio doc why he didn't prescribe a blood thinner? Did the angio doc know anything about recent history of converting ?


    I guess this is why I recommended a third party who specialized in malpractice.
  11. by   Jay-Jay
    The doctor who did the angio SHARES office space with her, so he had access to all of my husband's records. And my husband had a pacemaker inserted, because his heart would pause for too long between beats when converting from a-fib to SR. So, all the facts SHOULD have been known by all parties....
  12. by   pickledpepperRN
    Jay-Jay:
    i am so sorry you and your husband have to go through this.

    I have reported doctors to the california Medical Board. All I get is a polite letter stating they will look into it. There is no discipline on the record BUT the behavior changes.
    One was an internist who wouldn't answer calls at night leaving no one else on call.
    I had to get our hospital units medical director to call in another doc in an emergency to save the patient.
    Several years after my report (foLlowing MANY hospital incident reports) he always answers his page when no one is taking call for him.

    I believe the "Old Boy (& girl) " doctors behind the scenes discussions worked to change that unsafe practice.

    At the hospitals where I work the patient stopping coumadid has routing PTs until low enough, goes into the telemetry unit with heparin until the cath lab. Heparin is given in the cath lab too, then DCd on the unit. We do bedside APTTs until it is low enough to pull the sheath. Both are restarted hours after the sheath is removed for patients who needed it pre cath.
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I am so sorry for all this jay-jay. You received good advice so I can't add more. Best wishes and keep us informed, OK?

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