Getting to Know You - Getting to Know All About You! Getting to Know You - Getting to Know All About You! | allnurses

Getting to Know You - Getting to Know All About You!

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    Welcome to installment #11 of the A to Z for a Rocking Retirement. K = KNOW YOURSELF. Who are you anyway? Isn’t this the time, as you approach retirement, to really find out and put your best self forward for a stellar new life ahead? After all, this is your second chance at creating a life you love after being all things to all people for all those years. Now it is YOUR TIME to really GET TO KNOW the REAL YOU!

    Getting to Know You - Getting to Know All About You!

    I discovered a lot of things about myself when I entered the retirement zone and I’m not done discovering more. Here are some “awakenings” I’ve had that have allowed me to get to know and appreciate the real me better.

    Positives that REFLECT MY TRUE SELF
    • I still have a strong passion for wellness and it keeps me moving forward
    • I’m not done yet and have a lot more left to give
    • I don’t see an end in sight for my wellness work because it fulfills me intellectually and spiritually
    • I am capable of learning new stuff, even if it isn’t easy and fun, because it propels me forward
    • I recognize there are still a lot of people who need my talents and services – I just have to find them
    • I am better working solo because I have less stress, am more creative, can call the shots and thrive on not being told what to do
    • I have my own wellness business now and never thought that would be positive
    • I love having the freedom of creating my own business
    • I’m so glad I didn’t give up on myself and pursued a second round of living with purpose and passion

    Negatives that CHALLENGE MY TRUE SELF
    • I find difficulty staying focused and on task because working from home has a lot of distractions
    • I have to force myself to get out of the house and meet people or I get too isolated
    • I have to find my own clients in order to generate income and find that challenging because it’s all up to me
    • I find marketing myself and my services is harder than I expected
    • I’m in charge of all the tedious left brained activities necessary to run a business – and it holds me back from doing what I love - creating, planning, teaching

    I do realize now that MY TRUE SELF is challenged by these negatives (I don’t want to do them!) but I also realize I can turn them into positives once I learn how to manage them, so it’s all good. Let the learning curve continue!

    So what about you? Are you being your true self, or has it yet to be revealed? Remember how you were when you first became a nurse? Your beliefs, values, thoughts, feelings, passions, interests, view of you. How do they compare to where you are today? Same, or different? This is worth exploring because I know I am a very different person now than 40 years ago and I suspect some things have changed for you too.

    Complete this exercise about yourself and reflect on the findings:
    Then Now
    Beliefs
    Values
    Thoughts
    Feelings
    Passions
    Interests
    View of yourself

    Any revelations? How much have you changed over the years – or stayed the same? And are you expressing your TRUE SELF in everything you do or are you holding back? Remember this is the time in your life to be all you can be and do all you can do. Last chance. Don’t blow it by not KNOWING WHO YOU ARE – TRULY!

    Here are 3 questions to consider that will give you a glimpse of who you truly are.
    1. How are you when no one is looking?
    2. What or who would you be if you knew you could not fail?
    3. If money wasn’t important, how would you live your life differently?

    Thanks for taking the time for some deep insightful exploration. Your job now is to create a life that reflects who you truly are and live it to its fullest. And if you are already doing that – CONGRATULATIONS!

    Please share so we can all learn from your life experiences.
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  2. Visit Carol Ebert profile page

    About Carol Ebert

    Joined Feb '16; Posts: 26; Likes: 50.

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    10 Comments

  3. Visit  Jules A profile page
    #1 0
    Interesting post but I'm confused. I was looking for an article on retirement???
  4. Visit  tnbutterfly profile page
    #2 0
    Quote from Jules A
    Interesting post but I'm confused. I was looking for an article on retirement???
    Retirement does not mean you stop living. This author has many articles on allnurses on how to make the most of your retirement.
  5. Visit  JoannieO profile page
    #3 4
    Then look to me. Retirement is defined as "complete cessation of work." After 45-1/2 years, I left nursing in a variety of fields, including management and information systems. Quit per diem in September 2016 and finally decided that "No," am not going back. Right now, I am working on financial management and budgeting. I have freedom but have to get used to decreased spending and materialism that will not matter anyways. I'd like to begin a blog about Retirement for Nurses and I mean RETIREMENT. For me, it is taking care of yourself at last..had a PE last week--BP is 104/60, great bloodwork and the health gains from not working are amazing. Retirement is a process. My manager wanted me to stay working per diem in occupational health, a good job Monday through Friday, but know what? I am taking my good health and enjoying the time I have left. Think perhaps I will get into the arts. My guitar's lying over there, unused since my 20s. And painting? Yes. Exercise and cooking? Yeah. Love wildlife and swimming in the Ocean which in the summertime, is less than 5 miles from my home. No more being couped up indoors, wishing to be outside "playing." Just know that you have to leave it "to the Young." I still have much to do. From Loving Retirement so Far, -Joan
  6. Visit  Jules A profile page
    #4 2
    Quote from JoannieO
    Then look to me. Retirement is defined as "complete cessation of work." After 45-1/2 years, I left nursing in a variety of fields, including management and information systems. Quit per diem in September 2016 and finally decided that "No," am not going back. Right now, I am working on financial management and budgeting. I have freedom but have to get used to decreased spending and materialism that will not matter anyways. I'd like to begin a blog about Retirement for Nurses and I mean RETIREMENT. For me, it is taking care of yourself at last..had a PE last week--BP is 104/60, great bloodwork and the health gains from not working are amazing. Retirement is a process. My manager wanted me to stay working per diem in occupational health, a good job Monday through Friday, but know what? I am taking my good health and enjoying the time I have left. Think perhaps I will get into the arts. My guitar's lying over there, unused since my 20s. And painting? Yes. Exercise and cooking? Yeah. Love wildlife and swimming in the Ocean which in the summertime, is less than 5 miles from my home. No more being couped up indoors, wishing to be outside "playing." Just know that you have to leave it "to the Young." I still have much to do. From Loving Retirement so Far, -Joan
    Kudos Joan! I'm planning on doing it 100% also. As soon as the NP bubble bursts which I can see in the horizon and if that doesn't happen I will tap out at 62. I have enough money and investments right now that if I were to live simply I'd be fine well into the next several decades but the fact that I am making so much as well as the health insurance factor keeps me working for now.
  7. Visit  Jules A profile page
    #5 0
    Quote from tnbutterfly
    Retirement does not mean you stop living. This author has many articles on allnurses on how to make the most of your retirement.
    Did I say stop living? Sorry, I meant that it is my understanding that retirement means you stop working.
  8. Visit  LadysSolo profile page
    #6 0
    I am 61 years old now, plan to stay full-time until 64 or 65, and then to do part-time until age 70 (kind of ease into retirement.) I have been full-time since age 16, and in one of my previous jobs I saw many people who had done factory work starting at age 18 quit as soon as they had their 30 years in and they were dead of an MI within two years. My mom quit completely as soon as she could, and was in the throes of Alzheimer's disease within 3 years. So I figure easing into it is the best way. So health continuing as it is, that's the plan..... I have so many hobbies and interests that my friends say Alzheimer's disease has no chance!
  9. Visit  Jules A profile page
    #7 0
    Quote from LadysSolo
    I saw many people who had done factory work starting at age 18 quit as soon as they had their 30 years in and they were dead of an MI within two years. My mom quit completely as soon as she could, and was in the throes of Alzheimer's disease within 3 years.
    Probably not exactly cause and effect and just anecdotally I have seen many either work until they are asked to leave because they are no longer fit for duty or until they get sick and then die. I think it is worth considering our genetic predispositions also.

    I worked with a wonderful RN who was 68 years old and was visibly slowing down to the point that we used to assist her with her assignments. One day she said she wasn't feeling well and went down to the ED where she passed away awaiting transfer to medicine. It makes me sad to this day to think she worked so hard for so many years and never had the luxury of enjoying a bit of time in retirement. We never know what tomorrow will bring and I'm not counting on living an extra long healthy life and if I do that will be a bonus. Female life expectancy is 78.74 years and I'd imagine most are not well for a while leading up to their ultimate demise so I'm cutting out early and hoping to get some vacationing and gardening in.
  10. Visit  Nurse Beth profile page
    #8 0
    Not yet from experience, but retirement seems like a huge life adjustment from what I see. My plan is to learn from those who've done it successfully.
  11. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    #9 0
    Hubby is planning to retire in 3 1/2 years (at 67) from his full time job (he is already retired from the military 20+ years ago)but he is already stressing about "what will I do."

    I'm younger and at this point plan to work another 10 years and then go part time till I can't work any more.

    For me, advancing my education made all the difference - it gave my options that my ADN education just didn't provide me.
  12. Visit  Carol Ebert profile page
    #10 1
    This article reflects on the feelings and challenges I have in retirement and how it impacts what I do with this "new beginning". I am someone who doesn't ever want to officially retire, but just reinvent my retirement years into something productive and meaningful. There is alot of emotional stuff that comes up during retirement I'm finding, and we need to be ready for those challenges. Just hoping what I am living thru will be useful for others.

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