Getting around the 18 y.o requirement Getting around the 18 y.o requirement | allnurses

Getting around the 18 y.o requirement

  1. 0 My 14 y.o daughter has 21 college credits and is currently enrolled full time in a community college. She would very much like to be a nurse but does not want to start an Associates degree in nursing at 18. ( All AS nursing degrees require you to be 18 to start clinicals) We know she can complete the handful of non clinical classes before 18 but is there a beneficial avenue in which she can complete a bachelor's degree before 18 and go back for a limited time after 18 to get the nursing done?

    What is the best bachelors that will let her transfer to a BSN easily or is there another method to best utilize her time in college before she turns 18?
    Last edit by Joe V on 12:19 pm
    •  
  2. 67 Comments

  3. Visit  Meriwhen profile page
    #1 22
    If you daughter wants a bachelors in nursing (BSN), she can't do the "bachelors" part first and then go back to the "nursing" part. And while she could do another bachelors while she waits to turn 18, she will still have to attend a nursing program (BSN (traditional or accelerated), ADN or diploma) in order to become a nurse. Nursing is not an add-on program that she can decide to do on a whim. Nursing school has both theory/lecture and clinicals integrated in a specific way--one can't pick and choose what classes according to their own timeline.

    In addition, clinicals start almost immediately in nursing school, and can't be missed. Keep in mind that almost no hospital wants a minor doing clinicals on the floor...too much liability. Volunteering as a candy striper as a teen is one thing, but nursing students are assisting/performing procedures, giving medications and are responsible for patient care.

    She could start knocking off pre-requisite/co-requisite classes such as Anatomy & Physiology, Microbiology, Public Speaking/Communication (yes, very much required), Statistics, Ethics, and other non-nursing classes. But for the actual nursing program, she most likely will have to wait until she is 18.

    Sorry if this isn't what you--and she--want to hear.
  4. Visit  Meriwhen profile page
    #2 11
    Forgot to explain that an accelerated BSN program is for students who already have a bachelors--since all the pre-req courses for a bachelors are already done, it focuses more on the nursing courses. However, most accelerated BSN programs still require at least 2 years.
  5. Visit  Wile E Coyote profile page
    #3 13
    BS in a core science now, then accelerated BSN at 18. That's the only way I know how to keep her challenged until she ages in.
    If she fully fits the high-achiever mold, I feel that stopping at BS anything might not be in her best interest. Only her and those close to her can answer that, naturally.
  6. Visit  heinz57 profile page
    #4 12
    A Bachelors heavy in the sciences and maths might be a good option. This could be something like a pre-med or biochemistry degree. At 18 she could then take an Accelerated BSN or entry MSN. The science degree would open up paths to many other options since there is still time during those 4 years for another career goal to develop.
  7. Visit  canoehead profile page
    #5 10
    The university I went to had two years of nonclinical courses before anyone had to go on the hospital units. I'd recommend doing all the nonclinicals first, as others have said, and add on sciences that suit her interests. At 14, it's hard to imagine that she would have the emotional maturity to deal with situations nursing faces. It's a program that challenges more than just your intellect! I wonder if there are volunteer opportunities close by that would round out some of the life experiences she hasn't had. If not, a CNA program, or home health aid job would give her a taste. Maybe a volunteer fire dept would be an interesting place to start.
  8. Visit  elkpark profile page
    #6 38
    If daughter is so mature and accomplished, and wants to be a nurse so badly, how come Mom is here asking the questions instead of her? If she's mature and motivated enough for Mom to be looking for a way to bypass the established requirements for getting into nursing programs, surely she's mature and motivated to be investigating this herself??
  9. Visit  LetLoveNReasonUnite profile page
    #7 6
    Quote from elkpark
    If daughter is so mature and accomplished, and wants to be a nurse so badly, how come Mom is here asking the questions instead of her? If she's mature and motivated enough for Mom to be looking for a way to bypass the established requirements for getting into nursing programs, surely she's mature and motivated to be investigating this herself??
    Maybe her mother just thought of doing this for her. Do not make assumptions about her daughter. Clearly she must be very bright if she's already embarking on a nursing education at 14. Some people are so quick to jump to assumptions.
  10. Visit  LetLoveNReasonUnite profile page
    #8 1
    Quote from Meriwhen

    She could start knocking off pre-requisite/co-requisite classes such as Anatomy & Physiology, Microbiology, Public Speaking/Communication (yes, very much required), Statistics, Ethics, and other non-nursing classes. But for the actual nursing program, she most likely will have to wait until she is 18.

    Sorry if this isn't what you--and she--want to hear.
    I like this suggestion. Obviously your daughter must be very bright. You must be very proud of her. Another option is that she could enrol in online courses through a university such as Athabasca University. Athabasca University. Open. Online. Everywhere. : Athabasca University I do not know what their restrictions are but surely if you are looking to dispense money on an education, there will be a university willing to take your money.
  11. Visit  Been there,done that profile page
    #9 18
    We are not academic advisors. Discuss this with her school counselors.
    It appears she could complete her pre-requisites in either an ASN or BSN program. But then she would still need to be accepted to nursing school. GPA is only a part of that process.
    Plenty of bright people have tried to get into nursing school and didn't make the cut.
  12. Visit  MHDNURSE profile page
    I am guessing maybe she is home schooled? She can start by getting some actual hospital experience by volunteering as a candy striper, make sure she likes being in a hospital. Part of the reason there is an age requirement, apart from liability, is because intellectually, one needs to be able to make critical decisions, think abstractly and outside of the box, many times in an instant. Developmentally, these skills don't usually manifest until AT LEAST 18, and usually more like 21. I would encourage her to continue to pursue college level science courses, throw in a statistics course for good measure, volunteer in a hospital or LTC facility, and be patient. Once she is 18, she can hopefully apply all her college level courses to get the cores out of the way, do some electives she finds interesting, and start her clinicals.
  13. Visit  WestCoastSunRN profile page
    I know a few kid who are or have done early college. The challenge with all of these children is that they were/are still children despite going to college at a young age. A younger college student is NOT like and adult college student. Children and adolescents have different developmental needs than adults. This doesn't mean a kid shouldn't lunge ahead academically if they are ready, but if I were you, OP mama, I would try to shift my perspective (and help shift my daughter's) into seeing the constraints on becoming a nurse a blessing instead of a curse (or something to try to get around).
    To keep her challenged, motivated and moving in an absolutely positive direction, I suggest (as others have) that you encourage her to focus on math and science -- without negating writing/communication. If her interest is in healthcare, I might go forward as you would in a pre-med degree -- which the options for that are vast. Look into requirements for PA schools and make sure she's getting those in her undergrad. Get her in a CNA class as soon as possible and volunteering at the hospital. Give her a chance to really explore what working in healthcare looks like. If she finishes her non-nursing undergrad early -- think about a gap year doing mission work. There is SO much she can be doing and learning while still achieving great things and not rushing others.
  14. Visit  SmilingBluEyes profile page
    My daughter is also a minor and has been accruing college coursework since 16, and will have her associate's degree before 18. She is taking nursing pre-requisite coursework now and by the time she is actually (hopefully) in a BSN program, will be just over 18 and maybe an RN by 21. You should be speaking to college advisors, not a board of nurses. THIS is where you get pointed in the right direction, not getting opinions and maybe a few tongue-in-cheek answers.

    Good luck; I homeschooled mine with good results and they had college work before 18. Both were in public high school after being homeschooled for 4 years.


    Your daughter is advanced; Nothing wrong with that; but when in college, ask the EXPERTS!
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Jan 9

close