Florence Nightengale - who is she? - page 4

Just curious. Since Florence Nightengale is the "Mother of Modern Nursing" or something like that, what do nurses know about her or think about her? Any comments would be appreciated.... Read More

  1. by   llg
    Originally posted by donmurray
    We are having a TV poll here on great Britons, In FN's bio, they mentioned that infection/death rates at Scutari initially rose, after she took over.
    Anyone heard of Mrs Bedford-Fenwick, who proposed nurse Registration, and was the first UK RN.......No. 1

    Back in 1979, I had to write a paper on Mrs. Bedford-Fenwick as part of a class I was taking in Nursing Administration. The class was part of my Master's Degree program (in the United States.)
    So, yes, I have heard of heard of her. While she is not nearly as well-known here in the States, she has not been totally forgotten.

    For that class back in 1979, each student had to do a paper and presentation on a different nursing leader from history. Studying their lives, careers, and the issues they confronted facilitated our appreciation of our profession, its development, and the contemporary issues we face. It helped us develop a perspective that most nurses never develop. I wish more nursing programs (both graduate and undergraduate) would include such activities.

    llg
  2. by   llg
    Originally posted by donmurray
    We are having a TV poll here on great Britons, In FN's bio, they mentioned that infection/death rates at Scutari initially rose, after she took over.
    Anyone heard of Mrs Bedford-Fenwick, who proposed nurse Registration, and was the first UK RN.......No. 1

    Back in 1979, I had to write a paper on Mrs. Bedford-Fenwick as part of a class I was taking in Nursing Administration. The class was part of my Master's Degree program (in the United States.)
    So, yes, I have heard of heard of her. While she is not nearly as well-known here in the States, she has not been totally forgotten.

    For that class back in 1979, each student had to do a paper and presentation on a different nursing leader from history. Studying their lives, careers, and the issues they confronted facilitated our appreciation of our profession, its development, and the contemporary issues we face. It helped us develop a perspective that most nurses never develop. I wish more nursing programs (both graduate and undergraduate) would include such activities.

    llg
  3. by   abrenrn
    I agree with llg. We are not taught are history, don't know where we've come from, so we don't really know who we are.
  4. by   florry
    Originally posted by P_RN
    FreeRooster55 you have been taken in by a myth.

    She died of heart failure August 13, 1910.

    http://www.florence-nightingale-aven...q.htm#Syphilis
    As far as we know, FN the aprox. 6-8 years of life lost her memory, she was almost blind, she used morphine to kill her pain (remember her staying in bed for 40 years and had some fatigue syndrom/PTSS.

    Allthough she was,- until her memory lost very busy by corresponding with "importent people" to reorganize the nursing esp. in India. - And on the personal plan she was very caring about every sister in training by Florence Nightingale school
    at S. Thomas'. She gave them some usefull things, money and so on. This is from the biography by Cook and Woodham Smith, witch are some of the most important and detailed books about her shortly after she past away.

    The theory(?) about syphilis I have never seen, and I have done a lot of research about her. If she had that, I think the symptoms would have come alot earlier than 80 years old..... I have seen it confirmed that she godt dementia senilis. (allthough they didnt have an MRI or SPECT on that time.....)
  5. by   florry
    Originally posted by abrenrn
    I agree with llg. We are not taught are history, don't know where we've come from, so we don't really know who we are.
    Yes, I think that was I good path looking at our history! And what can I see and what can I learn looking back on this path...? Just wondering.
    From
    Florry
  6. by   Ariko
    We had to study St. Flo in nursing theory class. My MAJOR complaint about her is
    1) she did not like men in nursing (not all that uncommon still) and 2) she felt that women were naturally nurses ergo, they did not need to be trained. This is clearly heresy (get it) to criticize her, but Johns Hopkins did a lot more for nursing in my view.

    (a male RN)
  7. by   florry
    Originally posted by Ariko
    We had to study St. Flo in nursing theory class. My MAJOR complaint about her is
    1) she did not like men in nursing (not all that uncommon still) and 2) she felt that women were naturally nurses ergo, they did not need to be trained. This is clearly heresy (get it) to criticize her, but Johns Hopkins did a lot more for nursing in my view.

    (a male RN)
    Hello!

    Maybe she loved her profession more than men!
    But still loved men..Maybe it was a coping mechanism related to the home or the parents she had...They expected though that she should marry a man. I think she married her nursing.....
  8. by   nightingale
    In considering her era, Florence was a revolutionary woman.


    Thank you to all for this invigorating discussion.
  9. by   prmenrs
  10. by   mark_LD_RN
    Originally posted by florry
    Hello!

    Maybe she loved her profession more than men!
    But still loved men..Maybe it was a coping mechanism related to the home or the parents she had...They expected though that she should marry a man. I think she married her nursing.....
    the point is she did not like men in nursing. just her statements like women only have the nurturing nurse instinct. is enough to invalidate her mularchy. may be she was a pioneer in her day. but she is NOT the mother of modern nursing.
    i feel it is fine to learn about her to see where nursing was and how we changed. but i do not believe she did so much good for nursing.
  11. by   florry
    Where have you read that she didn't like men in nursing?
    Pastor Fliedner with his wife had their nursing home for poor children in Kaiserswert in Germany, where FN learned her nursing! Do you meen he was not doing nursing, maybe because he was a pastor....? What is nursing?- Is it one simple definition of nursing..?

    I agree that nowaday nursing is notalike victorian nursing (thank God for that), but maybe, and I say maybe we can learn something from the past? I think she liked men in nursing, yes, but agree that she had som spec. ideas about who should turn into nursing and spec. The Nightingale School of nursing...

    I would more than ever get that source, that she didn't like men in nursing! I don't think so, you see. Personally; thank God that we have men in nursing!!!!!!
    Hope I am not teasing or offending you, but the last sentence; I really mean it!

    Best from Florry
  12. by   florry
    I forgot someting: she didn't like the surgion/doctors (an allmost all of them where male..except Mrs. Mary Seecole, a foreign doctor doing a lot for that time medicine.

    All the doctors in the military were men, and they didn't like her interference, espec. in the beginning of the war against Russia.
    After a while they saw the statistics about surviving...and all her organization in nursing, and that worked!

    (Sorry, but I love discussion her, even that I dont agree with her theory allways....)
  13. by   abrenrn
    I think asking nurses to look at their history is like asking them to look at their professions.

    YES - she said wrong things - no man is as good as a woman TRAINED in nursing.

    She emphasized nursing as a SKILL. It needed to researched, studied, and evaluated.

    She never said all women naturally nurse - women end up doing most of the "amateur nursing" they should have some instruction - that's what Notes on Nursing was about. This was not the same as the training and education she insisted on for professional nursing.

    Why, when looking at FN, any nursing, only bad is remembered by most? Only the WRONG things she said - never the right!!

    What's the point.

    I think I'm out of nursing now. Thanks for helping me make this decision.

    Maybe Home Depot is hiring. Sure beats being a nurse with a BS, MS, very smart, very accoutanble - BUT only supposed to be smart when employer asks, never let anyone think I'm smart - god forbid, may take something away from MDs. Only account to employers, never to patients or my license.

    Thanks again for reminding me.

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