Fired!

  1. 0
    So I started on a L&D unit a few months ago. My dream job. I was never given a fair chance because all the nurses hated me. Instead of telling me things and teaching me things while on orientation, they would go to management anytime I did anything wrong. I wasnt given a preceptor who was trained. I was with a different person everytime. It was ridiculous. The union said if i really wanted to i could get my job back because they did so many things wrong, but i dont want it. I was miserable. It was so bad that even patients complained to management that the nurses were so mean to me. The educator of the unit disciplined me. They admitted the unit was toxic and not conducive to learning right in front of the vp of the union. I can't do anything about it because they prevented me from being in the union by extending my probation period. And the list goes on...Anyway I was let go. On ridiculous grounds. Things that weren't even true were put in my discipline paper that I refused to sign. They did so many things wrong. Anyway my question is should I use this job on my résumé. I really want to work in L&D or something around that field and this is my only experience in that specialty. How do I explain what happened? I have 2 years experience in another specialty and kept my job at the hospital per diem just in case and was able to pick up hours for now. But I have an interview coming up where I listed this job. I really want this job. I feel Im meant to be in this field. It truly is where my heart is in nursing, but the question is How do I explain it?
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  3. 43 Comments so far...

  4. 3
    Yes, put that on your résumé if someone there can verify your good work. If ask why you left the job just say "seeking better opportunities." Plus it's not legal for employers to ask if you got fired or not. Hope this helps, good luck.
    ToothFairy(5), aachavez, and Marshall1 like this.
  5. 20
    Quote from murberry
    Yes, put that on your résumé if someone there can verify your good work. If ask why you left the job just say "seeking better opportunities." Plus it's not legal for employers to ask if you got fired or not. Hope this helps, good luck.
    That is incorrect. Employers can and do ask if you have ever been terminated.
    canoehead, Marisette, Paws2people, and 17 others like this.
  6. 3
    Be very honest. I might say something (if asked) like, "They are going through some change right now, and I think that maybe it was not the best time to bring me onboard." If they go on and say, "explain", this is when you keep it tight, but brutally honest. That you are very aware of what bringing on someone new to the specialty/unit involves for the unit and the new nurse. If there is too much going on, the whole thing fails. That this has not diminished your desire to find your new unit, at all, it just has given you even more insight and drive to find your unit!

    I don't believe in making nice too much. You have to see how "they" react to what you say, in order to get some information for yourself as well.
    canoehead, NRSKarenRN, and GrnTea like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from LandD_RN_chica
    So I started on a L&D unit a few months ago. My dream job. I was never given a fair chance because all the nurses hated me. Instead of telling me things and teaching me things while on orientation, they would go to management anytime I did anything wrong. I wasnt given a preceptor who was trained. I was with a different person everytime. It was ridiculous. The union said if i really wanted to i could get my job back because they did so many things wrong, but i dont want it. I was miserable. It was so bad that even patients complained to management that the nurses were so mean to me. The educator of the unit disciplined me. They admitted the unit was toxic and not conducive to learning right in front of the vp of the union. I can't do anything about it because they prevented me from being in the union by extending my probation period. And the list goes on...Anyway I was let go. On ridiculous grounds. Things that weren't even true were put in my discipline paper that I refused to sign. They did so many things wrong. Anyway my question is should I use this job on my résumé. I really want to work in L&D or something around that field and this is my only experience in that specialty. How do I explain what happened? I have 2 years experience in another specialty and kept my job at the hospital per diem just in case and was able to pick up hours for now. But I have an interview coming up where I listed this job. I really want this job. I feel Im meant to be in this field. It truly is where my heart is in nursing, but the question is How do I explain it?
    Maybe try a non union hospital. I did clinicals at a couple of union hospitals and many of the ppl were nasty and always threatened to file complaints in each other. Not saying that all union hospitals are like that but just my experience.
  8. 0
    Thank you for your input. Netglow that was a good idea. I was going to say it was toxic environment not conducive to learning but I don't want to portray myself in a negative light and I don't know what they will say if the interviewer contacts them. I don't know what to do.
  9. 0
    They allow the nurses to run the unit and have too much say. It's absolutely ridiculous. And the nurse who was bullying me didn't even get in trouble even when the patients complained.
  10. 1
    Where I live it is not legal to ask an employer when they do a verification if they were let go or quit. They can ask if the person can be re-hired. They also cannot tell anyone why they were fired. Doesn't mean they don't but legally they should not be.
    priorities2 likes this.
  11. 7
    If this were me, I would have let the union fight for me to get my job back if only to get my personnel record cleared of being dismissed. At least then I could have resigned rather than have that on my record. Is it too late to change your mind on this?
    ambrr, Marisette, dpcRN, and 4 others like this.
  12. 2
    One of my nursing jobs was, well, toxic! We had a clique, and if you were in it OR didn't do anything to upset them/ask any questions, things were good. If they didn't like you, you asked too many questions, upset them or thought for yourself, or whatever - they not only talked about you, they complained to management about you and worked on getting rid of the people they didn't like. One of their "tricks" was to send new staff just off orientation to nights (where the nurse educator and nurse manager weren't around to evaluate the situation themsleves) and the nights group would either make stuff up or find ways they catch you not being 100% right...and it get exaggerated and reported (the exaggerated version of events).

    My advice would be to not give up. There is something better out there. Nothing will be perfect, but there will be something that is a much better fit for you that will come along when you least expect it. I wasn't 100% looking to leave my second job as it was leaps and bounds better than my first, but I had the chance to move closer to family and I jumped on it. I LOVE my current job. Our educators are great, our managers and assistant managers are great. Our charge nurses are pretty great too. There are still "days" as every job has bad days, but the good outnumbers the bad by far.

    When I was asked why I left my first job, in interviews for other jobs - I calmly explained why I felt it was unsafe for staff and patients. I didn't trash my former employer, just identified several flaws. There were positives too, I learned a lot about nursing, I learned so much from some of my patients/have amazing stories about how I positively affected them and more importantly, I learned who I don't want to become in my career. It's a hard lesson to learn, and it sounds like you (original poster) are well on your way to learning it yourself.

    I would be honest about having worked at XYZ - depending on how they conduct background checks, they will almost certainly find it. Many hospitals state that omissions are considered lies and any lies/falsification on applications can be grounds for withdrawal of offers and/or dismissal if they later find out you lied. And there is so much (undoubtedly) that you learned, give yourself credit!

    And, I agree with a previous poster, if my union rep had said they had grounds to fight the dismissal, I probably would have let them fight for me, if for no other reason than to clear my name. But you have to make the best choice for you, and that's not for me to decide.
    nrsang97 and IHeartNursing321 like this.


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