Explain How Nurses Strike...

  1. I mean do they simply walk off the job or finish the shift and at the appointed time the strike begins? Do replacement, dare I say "scab" nurses, have to be waiting in the wings before a strike can take place?

    It would seem that a nurse could not simply abandon his/her patients strike or no strike. Educate this right to work state RN in the south as to just how this process unfolds.

    Thanks in advance,

    JF
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   mandykal
    I would think they would finish their assigned shift if scheduled to work first. I wouldn't think they would risk their license and abandon their pts.... I know in MA they can't work more than 16 hours so the company would definitely have to find a reliever possible an agency staff nurse.
  4. by   pmcd8243
    This is where the rubber meets the road and all of those who slam strike replacement nurses do not think it through. Without"scabs" nurses would not be able to strike. Its 0700 on Monday and the strike is called. All of the union night shifters are on the job. The Monday day shift is a no show. Now what?
    No strike nurses and the night shift can not leave. They have to report off to someone or stay until replaced. If they walk out without reporting off to a qualified replacement then they should just tear up the licinses on the way out and prepare for felony abandonment charges. In short, no scabs no strike.
    P
  5. by   elkpark
    Quote from pmcd8243
    This is where the rubber meets the road and all of those who slam strike replacement nurses do not think it through. Without"scabs" nurses would not be able to strike. Its 0700 on Monday and the strike is called. All of the union night shifters are on the job. The Monday day shift is a no show. Now what?
    No strike nurses and the night shift can not leave. They have to report off to someone or stay until replaced. If they walk out without reporting off to a qualified replacement then they should just tear up the licinses on the way out and prepare for felony abandonment charges. In short, no scabs no strike.
    P
    I'm only familiar with the standards in my own state, but my BON definition and discussion of "abandonment" specifically states that if your shift is completed and there is no one to report off to and replace you, you are only obligated to remain some reasonable amount of time (not specified/defined, but I have been told verbally that that means not more than a few hours) to give management a chance to find someone to replace you, and then you are free to leave -- it is the responsibility of management to find staff to replace you. So, in your scenario, in my (Southern, right-to-work) state, the night shift staff would only need to remain a few hours into the day shift, and no one would need to tear up her/his license on the way out of the building ...

    Heartwarming to know, though, that there are people out there willing to defend scabs and the vital role they play in improving working conditions for nurses.
  6. by   pickledpepperRN
    I've never been on strike but have supported fellow nurses.
    CNA gives a ten day strike notice. Usually that brings management to the table in earnest avoiding a strike.

    If ther IS a strike the hospital has at least ten days, usually more, to postpone elective surgeries, transfer patients to another facility, and other planning.
    The time I was there replacement nurses were bused in from a hotel. There was nearly 1:1 even on med-surg.
    Nurses wear their uniform. The CEO, and nursing management are given the cell number of "picket captains". They are to be called if there is a need for the nurses to go inside and care for patients. It is not considered crossing the line if management says the nurse(s) is needed.

    Both time I was there the nurses called a one day strike but were locked out for several more days.
    I remember only one time a nurse went in. A man drove up with his wife in labor. The L&D RN took the patient inside, assisted with the delivery, and gave report to her manager after the healthy baby was born. The came back out to the picket line.

    Both times there was overwhelming support by the nurses due to extreme disrespect for nursing care by top management (not nursing management).
    I've been told of some bad feelings more than twenty years after a strike. Nurses who crossed the line were shunned. That is sad.
  7. by   bagladyrn
    As Spacenurse said, 10 days notice is standard for nursing strikes. Gives plenty of time for other arrangements to be made or for management to get serious about negotiating. Arrangements are always made for nurses from the strikers to go in to cover pts. or situations that can't safely be covered by transfer or other ways.

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