Ever had a nurse or doc as a patient? - page 7

So... how bad was it? And while you are at it, ever BEEN a patient? How bad were you? :chuckle Com'on... be honest!... Read More

  1. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from snowfreeze
    having your co-worker as a patient is difficult. having your boss as a patient is even worse. but the positive side is you probably already know enough about them that when they are really out of it after anesthesia...re-orientation is easier.
    i took care of my boss's brand new father-in-law.

    i'm not sure how i got picked for the assignment. my boss had the idea that there are "nice nurses" (the nurse that breaks the rules to give you everything you want) and there are "good nurses," (the nurse who follows the rules and tries to give you everything you need) and that a "nice nurse" was better than a "good nurse." she was a nice nurse; i was a good nurse. then she became manager.

    father-in-law had full blown dts on my watch. horrible day! everyone i worked with came by to tell me they were soooo glad they weren't me!

    after the whole thing was over with, my boss told the asst manager to tell me that she'd had to rethink the whole "nice nurse/good nurse" thing, and that she was glad i was the one taking care of her father-in-law. she was never able to tell me, but i heard anyway.

    ruby
  2. by   MamaTheNurse
    Quote from kadokin
    That is exactly why I don't tell the staff I am an RN when myself or a loved one is hospitalized. They tend to assume I know more than I do. I want to hear everything you tell your other pts, b/c there are a LOT of things I DON'T KNOW! Also, I thinks it makes the staff unduly nervous when they know a family member is a healthcare professional.
    my friend's mother was in the hospital at Northwestern and he kept his mouth shut and let the staff do their job - he was asking questions to clarify her discharge instructions and the nurse asked "Are you a nurse or something?" and he said yeah - they said to him "How refreshing to have a family member who's a nurse who let us do what we had to do without trying to take over!" - he said "You guys did just fine so I didn't feel I needed to say anything. I know what it's like to have that happen to me." - they laughed and said "Boy, we wish all nurses were like you!"
    It's too bad more nurses don't know the difference between being an advocate for your family and butting in unnecessarily.......................
    When I used to visit my grandfather in LTC, my grandma made a point of telling anyone who would listen that I was an RN - I would just smile and say "I'm no help unless the patient is crowning!" (I worked OB at the time)
  3. by   nicholrwalker
    I guess I was an irritating family member......My 88 y/o grandmother was in the hospital,and we requested a private room for her. I stayed with her most nights. One night her nurse came in with an injection for her while she was receiving her abx. When I asked her what she was giving her she informed me it was Valium...for agitation. My grandma and I were watching T.V and no where near agitated. So I questioned the order...mean while she was proceeding to inject the drug into her port,at which time I told her to please stop....from what I know you cannot mix valium with anything and on top of that i would like to see the order or MAR. She left the room and did not return. I went to the nurses station at which time it was told to me that her shift ended at 10p, and our new nurse would help us. I asked for the supervisor. Long story short..grandma never had it ordered to begin with,and she had received it the last three nights before I got there. I was very hot:angryfire :angryfire Not to mention the nurse did not know proper administration of drugs. But most of all refused to come back and face us after she found out the med had never been ordered. :angryfire :angryfire
  4. by   MamaTheNurse
    Quote from nicholrwalker
    I guess I was an irritating family member......My 88 y/o grandmother was in the hospital,and we requested a private room for her. I stayed with her most nights. One night her nurse came in with an injection for her while she was receiving her abx. When I asked her what she was giving her she informed me it was Valium...for agitation. My grandma and I were watching T.V and no where near agitated. So I questioned the order...mean while she was proceeding to inject the drug into her port,at which time I told her to please stop....from what I know you cannot mix valium with anything and on top of that i would like to see the order or MAR. She left the room and did not return. I went to the nurses station at which time it was told to me that her shift ended at 10p, and our new nurse would help us. I asked for the supervisor. Long story short..grandma never had it ordered to begin with,and she had received it the last three nights before I got there. I was very hot:angryfire :angryfire Not to mention the nurse did not know proper administration of drugs. But most of all refused to come back and face us after she found out the med had never been ordered. :angryfire :angryfire
    now, that was definitely a situation where you needed to be an advocate for your family!!!
  5. by   Bipley
    Quote from RoxanRN2003
    Definitely one of my biggest pet peeves is when a hospital big-wig or MD get preferencial treatment. Would I as a regular staff nurse get the same kind of treatment?? I think not.
    You might be surprised. I was floored when I had hand surgery. My friends really came through for me. I got ALL kinds of special extras. I am absolutely drawing a blank at the name of this thing but when little old ladies come out of surgery and the warm air is blowing on them to keep their body temp up? What's that called? I woke up to one of those just because it feels good and believe me, it DOES feel good! It was a special treat from one of the PACU nurses. That is just one of many examples.

    It reminded me that special perks don't come from those in high places. A kid from CS made sure I had absolutely everything I could have wanted. Sweet stuff, things that don't really matter but they are just nice. A gal from the kitchen brought me Chocolate. HA! She brought me Nutella because she didn't know if someone could chew after hand surgery. (Nutella is kinda sorta like liquid Chocolate) She knows I LOVE Chocolate and wanted to make things as nice as she could.

    One of the nurses is quite the artist. With my can of diet soda I got roses. Of course, it was a drawing of roses, but roses nonetheless.

    A podiatrist friend of mine came to visit me in recovery. He swears I didn't say anything stupid but I'd still feel better if I knew what we discussed.

    I was treated better than a VIP. I will say that the things done for me when I had simple hand surgery meant the world to me. I still treasure the efforts.
  6. by   Bipley
    Quote from michelle126
    Right now I have 2 nurses that run the 3-11 Shift in my LTC. Once a nurse..always a nurse. Follows me around during med pass, love to review new orders with me and will occasionally do a bed check.
    I had an elderly female patient with a leg wound. NOTHING we did would heal this wound. She had severe dementia. One day I was doing a dressing change and I was talking to her as I was working. I was basically just rambling and thinking outloud.

    Earlier in the thread I mentioned the RPh that hid his beer in his urinal. (gahhh) He overheard me talking as I was dressing this wound. He mentioned a product that would make it heal quickly. I don't recall, it was called either Red Scarlett or Scarlett Red. I remember the box, it is made by Lilly. It looks like a gel and it is blood red. I asked him if he was sure, he said he was positive. It would work like a charm.

    I talked to the doc and he agreed to try as we were all at a loss as to how to treat this wound.

    The old, beer drinking, beer hiding RPh was on the money. It cleared up the wound in no time.

    I learned lots of things in my LTC facility. One is that when someone is retired from their profession, they may just know what they are talking about even if they are bizarre. :chuckle
  7. by   bjlee
    I had a cardiologist s/p CABG. He was a "treat". on Post-op day #2 he demanded to talk to a pulmonologist to schedule a "bronchoscopy and possible biopsy". After some encouragement with his incentive spirometer, a touch of morphine, and a talk from the cardiothoracic attending, he was breathing much better. I hope he takes that experience back to his practice with him.
  8. by   rach_nc_03
    I had a hip arthroscopy yesterday- outpatient surgery, but i had some interesting moments...

    1. anesthesiologist came in to explain intubation in very simplistic terms. she started talking about using 'medicine to help make you relax', and i said, 'what meds, specifically?' she hesitated, then i mentioned that i'm a nurse, and she immediately switched into medical terminology- in exactly the same tone, though, like i was a three year old. guess that's just the way she talked! :chuckle

    2. 2nd anesthesiologist asked how i did with postop pain meds, and i said i had better experiences with dilaudid than morphine- so he said he'd write for fentanyl and dilaudid, which helped tremendously, as i get very nauseated with morphine.

    3. OR nurse came in to the pre-op room to talk to me, and she walked me through some of the positioning and whatnot that would happen after i was put under anesthesia...they had to dislocate my hip for the procedure, so i was a little apprehensive. she was so nice and relaxed, it helped me to relax.

    4. after i got my versed on the way to the OR, i got chatty. i just remembered a few minutes ago that i was interrogating the CRNA about something while they were trying to keep the O2 mask on me before they started the propofol. How embarassing! :imbar

    5. my first nurse in the pacu was great- my pain was 9/10, and she kept pushing the PRNs as frequently as they were ordered until she got me down to a 6/10...then she left to transfer another patient, and i got this really annoying nurse who refused to give me anything else...brought me my percocet and said, 'that should start to work in about 5 minutes'. Hello? Tablets? Then she brought a chair for me to be trasnferred into, lowered my siderails, closed the curtain, and said i needed to edge myself over to the side of the bed and dangle my legs. Then she left! Hey, i just had HIP SURGERY! how about some help? luckily, the first nurse came back, helped me, and gave me more meds.

    overall, i think i was an okay patient....i was irritated with the nurse who wouldn't give me pain meds or help me get up, but everyone else was great.
  9. by   ErikaRNC
    Within 6 months of graduating from the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) College of Nursing I was diagnosed with Hodgkin's Lymphoma stage III (of IV) and admitted to UNMC.

    I think I was a great patient to the nurses (I didn't even ask for a shower curtain that was missing in my shared bathroom because I didn't want to bother my nurses with something so trivial; yes I showered without a curtain), but I certainly was (and still am) aggressive and demanding of the different physicians that rotated through the cancer service.

    Because I not only was a nursing student at UNMC, I had worked there as a phlebotomist and so I knew the ins and outs of getting my most recent lab results before any of my doctors did. Hey -- it's MY life.

    I loved my main Oncologist Dr. Armitage ("Call me 'Jim'") who was wonderful beyond expectation in both intelligence and compassion. But another Oncologist, whose named rhymed with the title of a current movie at the time "The Wrath of Kahn" butted heads with me without shame. I refused to let him touch me! One of the times "Dr. Kahn" was the admitting doctor when I needed to be admitted for being "hot and low" (high fever with pancytopenia) "Dr. Kahn", with his entourage of med students told me I needed to have a Lumbar Puncture. I let go of all civility and made it unmistakenly clear that I would not allow him to perform the LP on me. I guess I may have embarrassed him in front of his idolizing students, or the students may have made up their minds that I was one of those horrific "difficult patients". I would only allow Dr. Armitage to do the LP. "Dr. Kahn" said that was a mistake because Dr. Armitage hadn't done an LP in a while. Fact that may be, but I was steadfast. Dr. Armitage did my LP without incident as the med students watched a now very pleasant patient complying by taking the fetal position to allow the insertion of a spinal needle into the sterile spine and aspirate the brain-bathing fluid.

    I remain a staunch supporter of patient empowerment -- even if it means a patient decides to use his/her empowerment to defer decisions to others.

    ~ Erika RN,C
    Last edit by ErikaRNC on Dec 2, '05
  10. by   Warpster
    I would have been a peach after my appendectomy had they not left me unmedicated for 10 hours after the surgery. You kniow, if she's sleeping (the anesthesia off) she can't possibly be in pain.

    I used the experience whenever I worked in a surgical wards. I never woke anyone up for a sleeping pill, but I sure woke them up for pain meds!
  11. by   bamiam
    I've been the patient and I loved it. Once they found out that I was an RN they passed it on to all the staff and I received great care! Truly makes a difference. But, then again, I was a very considerate and appreciative patient.
  12. by   CatLVNRN
    Of all the nurses and doctors Ive taken care of, not one ever gave me a hard time. I just went in, and did my usual thing, and I sort of pride myself that no matter who you are, you all get the same care from me.

    I was a patient last January, having had an emergency c-section. I assume the nurses looked at my chart and saw G6, P6, and figured I knew what was what following a section, though my youngest was 8, and I had never had a section before. I had an epidural, and my 7pm-7am nurse (the first nurse) came into my room and started an IV ABT, holding my plain IVF, and when the ABT ran out, she never came back in until the morning, just before her shift ended. (I was OUT thanks to the wonderful world of epidurals)
    Blood was backed up in my IV line and she PUSHED IT..
    Needless to say, I told her it hurt, she said it was ok, and she forced it, and I felt a POP! I screamed and she decided to call the doctor and ask her if she can DC it and therefore dc my epidural! Less than 24 hours after my section. Great...
    The next nurse was nice and made she I was kept comfie. BUt then at 7pm, I must have been assigned to the same nurse, because she NEVER CAME INTO MY ROOM her entire shift!!
    Long story short, I didnt tell them I was a nurse, because I didnt want them thinking I knew everything, when it had been to long for me to remember a lot, and I had never had an epi, or section. I could go on and on, but Ill leave it at that lol
    My doctor (who also delivered my 4th child) was horrified.
  13. by   yadda_yadda_yadda
    I've had several physicians & nurses as patients. Patient teaching certainly goes smoother. Best of all, the medical professionals I've cared for tended to take an active role in their recovery by asking questions & speaking up. I've always enjoyed them, myself.

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