dress code before clocking in - page 3

the hospital that i work at has just started a policy that requires all employees to dress ''business casual'' when coming to work, at work, and leaving work...i am an ob nurse that wears scrubs..i... Read More

  1. by   heatherbless
    Quote from fergus51
    That's just stupid. Of all the things they could concentrate on (like ways to improve patient care?) this is what they choose to spend their time on..... Oh pencil pushers....
    the next thing will be that...if you are a woman--you have to wear high heels with your scrubs while working--that is how ridiculous it all sounds! heather/
  2. by   TinyNurse
    personally I think that is bull crap.
  3. by   tmiller027
    Quote from heatherbless
    the next thing will be that...if you are a woman--you have to wear high heels with your scrubs while working--that is how ridiculous it all sounds! heather/

    Its so hot in our facility, I think I'm going to start working naked
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I won't work naked. A couple of our pts. are confused and delirious and reach out and grab anything, if ya know what i mean.
  5. by   tmiller027
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    I won't work naked. A couple of our pts. are confused and delirious and reach out and grab anything, if ya know what i mean.

    Don't worry, that already happened to me when a patient with dementia decided she didn't want to go to the toilet after all. Note to self: wear a cup to work LOL
  6. by   teeituptom
    thats sounds like an ouchie
  7. by   Calfax
    My 2 cents.....

    This sounds like a rule that can be safely ignored. It was created by some admin twinkie who'll be working somewhere else in a couple of years anyway. If you are terminated because you look sloppy coming into work or you cross-dress or you own lots of leather...then it's discrimination on a variety grounds. Find you a decent lawyer and spend a couple years in the Caribbean courtesy of your mgmt.

    Now if you look bad on the clock....well that's another story.

    Remember the pirates code (cause they sure do) "Take everything!!!! Give nothing back!" Arrrrrrr!
  8. by   teeituptom
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    The only dress code that our OR and Maternity floors have when it comes to what you wear into and out of the building is to not be tacky (ex. Daisy Dukes, boobs hanging out, thong hanging out). Doesn't matter what's worn just as long as it's decent.

    I like Daisy Dukes
    not on me of course
  9. by   WTF
    Hmmm, don't know why they should care.
  10. by   canoehead
    I would wear shopping-mall-casual, but not beach-casual, and tell them to bite me.
  11. by   P_RN
    This is open to interpretation. Business casual...what on earth does that mean......what is a banker's idea and what is a stripper's idea will probably vary quite a bit.

    I like the thrift shop approach. Nice (old) polyester doubleknit pants and maybe a wing collar polyester shirt.....worn every day....by ALL the department's employees and maybe a group picture for the newsletter? This is fairly open to interpretation.

    Or maybe plaid bermuda shorts with knee high black socks and sandals.......socks ARE sold in the hosiery department after all.
  12. by   canoehead
    Ahhhh....That's a beautifil picture
  13. by   roxannekkb
    They once tried to pass that stupid rule at a hospital I worked per diem at in LA. No jeans, no sweats. Everyone just ignored it, and in fact, all of the nurses wore the sloppiest clothes they could think of to get the point across.

    Unless they are paying you, they do not have the right to dictate what you wear in your spare time. If the shift starts at 7, and you arrive at 6:45, tell them very nicely that you will start adding the extra 15 minutes to your time card--and the extra 15 minutes at the end of the shift. I told the director of nursing at our hospital that--that if they wanted me to wear certain clothes to work, then they were going to have to start paying me pre-shift.

    The rule died a pathetic death. All of you nurses just have to refuse to do it, and/or tell them they will have to begin paying you from the moment you enter the hospital, if they think that they can dictate what you wear off-duty.

    Whenever I read all of this c***p that's going on, you really have to wonder--do hospitals think that this is going to solve the nursing shortage? By trying to get nurses to spend money on clothes they do not want or need? And that they will only wear from house to hospital?

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