Do you wear gloves - page 6

Sorry I have so many questions but you guys are so helpful. I was woundering do you wear gloves most of the time, like when taking blood, giving injections etc. I remeber being in a hospital and... Read More

  1. by   emily_mom
    I never used to think about it much until my nephews were born at 28 weeks, weighing 2 and 3 lbs. Many of the nurses in the NICU didn't wear gloves and they ended up contracting e coli thru their central line (which was behind their ear). The doctors told my sister that they "had no idea how the boys could have contracted it". Whatever!!!!

    Now I always insist on everyone who is working on me or a loved one to glove up. It only takes a few seconds. Someone tried to draw blood on my husband w/ no gloves....wrong!!!

    Kristy
  2. by   Faby
    hi. reading almost all the posts, there's an question that comes up to me. Are doctors and other healthcare staff members, different from nurses, as careless about handwashing as they are in Uruguay? We really have a problem hee, besides that not all nursing staff members are used to ALLWAYS wash their hands, we find that most doctors, and surgeons, are real careless about handwashing while they are in contaact with human fluids,ie when they are assesing patients and between one patient and another. It's a real problem, since if the patient's operating site gets infected, they generally blame nursing staff. they don't recognize their fault.
  3. by   fab4fan
    The more you use gloves for IV's/blood draws, the more skill you develop in feeling the vein, even with pedi sticks.

    One thing I do is wear a smaller glove, so that it fits tightly, almost like a second skin...that way I don't have the problem with the looseness at the fingertips.

    I also remember being told by some nurses many years ago that wearing gloves could be insulting to the pt., and make the pt. feel "dirty." The one nsg. home where I worked as an aide had older aides who did just about everything gloveless...they used to make fun of me for gloving to take out people's dentures. It absolutely grossed me out to see them stick their hands in a pt's mouth and pull out those grody dentures. Ick!
  4. by   nurs4kids
    me and my coworker's are terrible examples for universal precautions..

    we have a false sense of security d/t our patient population looking so innocent..so clean..

    i try to remind myself that i'm exposing myself to everything mom & dad have ever exposed themselves to, but I'm still a very poor glove wearer..

    don't always wear them starting iv's..
    don't always wear them changing diapers..
    never wear them changing soiled linens..

    only always..is when doing wound care/dsg changes.

    sad, real sad, eh?
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Mario, beautiful...but you forget ...it's not JUST YOURSELF YOU ARE PROTECTING by wearing gloves...it's your coworkers, your classmates,and the OTHER PATIENTS......think of it that way.....you need be concerned about more than your "own skin"....wearing gloves as part of observing Universal Precautions is NOT optional; it is a REQUIREMENT. For good reason.
  6. by   nurs4kids
    Originally posted by emily_mom
    I never used to think about it much until my nephews were born at 28 weeks, weighing 2 and 3 lbs. Many of the nurses in the NICU didn't wear gloves and they ended up contracting e coli thru their central line (which was behind their ear).
    Kristy
    central line behind their ear or ecoli???
  7. by   mario_ragucci
    Originally posted by emily_mom
    Someone tried to draw blood on my husband w/ no gloves....wrong!!!

    Kristy
    Someone coughed near my wife w/no mask...ejected!!!:kiss
  8. by   mario_ragucci
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    Mario, beautiful...but you forget ...it's not JUST YOURSELF
    Yes smiling blue eyes, I remember, and I could be a vehicle and not even know it. But I could never be a resevior. But thank you for reminding me and saying it so nice like i will never forget to consider the whole ball of wax.
    (rubber glove druid)
  9. by   charissa
    My daughter is only 18 months, but she knows what eewww yucks are. Unfortunetly it doesnt seem like most nurses are. I am always careful. What if I didnt wear gloves and took something home to my family? I am nervous about taking things home to them even when i am overly careful, which is most of the time. some nurses i work with dont, and i give reminders. My OBGYN draws blood sometimes in the office himself and NEVER wears gloves, it disgusts me, and i make a comment every time. The unfortunate thing about gloves is they aren't like steel toed boots, eventually you get a stick, even if your careful, accidents happen. The first time i did it was off of a needle that had just been used in a long time dialysis pt with vre of the urine and mrsa of the blood. talk about a scare, but i got lucky. I dont understand why people will not use them, if you dont like the powder, use powder free! I know there are problems with them, I have a latex allery, but they are our first and best defense for ourselves and our patient and families
  10. by   OrthoNutter
    I never wear gloves when starting IVs or taking blood because I too, can't feel the veins properly, especially if they're a hard stick. My thought is that gloves are not going to protect me from a needlestick anyway...it's not like they're made of industrial strength steel. :P But for all other jobs, the gloves are always there. A pair always lives in my pocket "just in case".
  11. by   neuroRN
    I ALWAYS wear gloves... Sometimes I have a difficult time starting IV's with gloves on, but then I will just put on the smallest size so I can feel the vein better, because I don't want to take any chances.
  12. by   baseline
    I come froma an era when blood was on the scrubs of many a hospital worker...nurses and doctors alike.........NOW??? I wear gloves....and lets remember .....WASH YOUR HANDS!!!!!!! Keep your skin protected and intact. WASH YOUR HANDS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  13. by   NRSKarenRN
    11/06/02

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released guidelines for hand hygiene in health care settings on October 25, 2002. According to the CDC, nearly 2 million patients in the United States get an infection in hospitals, and about 90,000 of these patients die as a result of their infection each year. The hand hygiene guidelines are part of an overall CDC strategy to reduce infections in health care settings to promote patient safety. To view guidelines, go to http://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/.

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