Do You take your patients out for smoke breaks? - page 4

We do, but I don't agree with it.... Read More

  1. by   nurse_atnite
    Well, I am an occasional smoker at a facility that will be going smoke free in a few months....I can honestly say that I have only taken a smoker out once.....didn't like the situation.....never did it again and soon won't have to worry about it. I really didn't like being the one responsible for that patient outside puffing away, but I also feel that if the patient is stable enough to go smoke we are not the ones to deny that request! :yeahthat:
  2. by   GooeyRN
    The staff that smokes takes out the smoking pts. They are usually very happy to get an extra smoke break. Non smoking staff can take them out of course, but prefer not too. I do not, since I do not smoke.
  3. by   CaseManager1947
    Our facility is going totally smoke free October 1st. People cannot even smoke in their vehicles, with windows rolled up in their cars in the parking lot... weeeeellll now. I don't know about that one going over too well, but I sure will be glad not to see patients with their IV poles out in front getting that early morning drag before the docs start rounding. UGH! As a reformed smoker (and I think we're more obnoxious, frankly), I applaud the hospitals' stand in doing this. It's not just our hospitals, but all facilities citywide are doing this, so people can't say "I'm checkin' out AMA so I can go to St. Elsewhere, they let u smoke over there>" Some probably will AMA, even so.
  4. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from nurse_atnite
    but I also feel that if the patient is stable enough to go out to smoke we are not the ones to deny that request!
    If they are stable enough to go out and smoke then they are stable enough IMO to be discharged.
  5. by   PatLPN
    Yes, I do take them out for a cigarette. I work in a SNF w/ an acute rehab unit & we have supervised smoking. For many of these residents, that is all they have to look forward to & I started working in LTC, hoping to make a small difference in these people's lives & they do appreciate the smoke breaks. Of couse, it helps that I also smoke. I try & put myself in their shoes.
  6. by   Kymmi
    I think the policy for LTC facilities should allow the resident to smoke because that is their "home". I know at the hospital Im at we are not allowed to deny a patient the right to smoke however we are also not allowed to enable them either. They must sign a AMA form for smoking and be able to get themselves to the smoking area. The form states the hospital is not responsible if they become injured while out smoking. I also know that if a patient has a MI or whatever while smoking and ends up on the ground unresponsive its a phone call to 911. Essentially its a release form stating that the patient is leaving the hospital parameters AMA and therefore any outcome is their responsibility.
  7. by   lvs2nrs3535
    At my LTC facility we have an MS patient who is no longer allowed to go out and smoke by himself. Any of you familiar with MS know that control is a huge issue with them, and having that last bit of control taken away has been very difficult for him, (and made life VERY difficult for us, when he is unhappy life is not good.). I do take him out to smoke, once a shift. I find it hard to do sometimes, I would rather not, it is hard to walk that line between professional and 2 people out for a smoke. I am a smoker, working on becoming a nonsmoker again, (I had gone three years without smoking, prenursing school, lol).
    Because of his situation, going out to smoke is in his careplan. This makes it very difficult for me as a charge nurse when I have someone, (RN or CNA), who refuses to do it because of their personal beliefs. I am sorry, but if you have never been a smoker, than you cannot understand what it is like to go through that withdrawal. And to refuse to do something that is actually on a patients care plan, well that makes my job harder. This is such a hard subject. I dont know what I am going to do when my quit date comes, cuz it will be very difficult to take him out to smoke. Big sigh. The things we have to deal with as nurses. I just know that I can see both sides of this problem. How about the gov finally makes this lethal habit illegal? (Oh yeah, I forgot. they make waaay to much money on tobacco. silly me.)
  8. by   lauralassie
    no...I don't. wouldn't take a diabetic to buy a candy bar
  9. by   crb613
    I don't have time .....But I would if I did....providing they are stable & able to go out.
  10. by   OB_or_NICU_hopeful
    Quote from KristyBRN
    At my LTC facility we have an MS patient who is no longer allowed to go out and smoke by himself. Any of you familiar with MS know that control is a huge issue with them, and having that last bit of control taken away has been very difficult for him, (and made life VERY difficult for us, when he is unhappy life is not good.). I do take him out to smoke, once a shift. I find it hard to do sometimes, I would rather not, it is hard to walk that line between professional and 2 people out for a smoke. I am a smoker, working on becoming a nonsmoker again, (I had gone three years without smoking, prenursing school, lol).
    Because of his situation, going out to smoke is in his careplan. This makes it very difficult for me as a charge nurse when I have someone, (RN or CNA), who refuses to do it because of their personal beliefs. I am sorry, but if you have never been a smoker, than you cannot understand what it is like to go through that withdrawal. And to refuse to do something that is actually on a patients care plan, well that makes my job harder.
    This is such a hard subject. I dont know what I am going to do when my quit date comes, cuz it will be very difficult to take him out to smoke. Big sigh. The things we have to deal with as nurses. I just know that I can see both sides of this problem. How about the gov finally makes this lethal habit illegal? (Oh yeah, I forgot. they make waaay to much money on tobacco. silly me.)
    I would think as a non-smoker it would be difficult to understand what he feels going through withdrawal, but also difficult to tolerate the smoke. I know I avoid second-hand smoke at all costs....it makes me feel like I'm suffocating. I can understand why they would refuse to subject themselves to someone elses deadly habit.
  11. by   muffie
    No Way
  12. by   studentally16
    :uhoh21: i think it depends on the patient and the hospital situation etc, i am a student and i have never taken a patient out for smoke breaks.

    In scotland now there is a smoking ban in all public places therefore patients are told to go to designated smoking areas outside.

    However, i do believe that it is the patients own personal choice We are there to give advice but in order to promote autonomy the patient has to make there own mind up whether to have a smoke break or not. I think the hospitals should have smoking rooms for patients who wish 2 smoke. Being in hospital is a stressful time for patients and smoke breaks could perhaps be something which destresses them, or calms them down which will in turn (depending on what they are in hospital for) proide them with some comfort while in hospital.
  13. by   elizabeth321
    Not a chance.

    Liz

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