Do you really want work with foreign nurses? - page 2

I am a BSN from Czech ¨Republic (small country in Europe). I will next yëar go do work to USA. I know I have to improve my english before (you can see from my writing). But I want to know your opininon... Read More

  1. by   ujumbe
    My experience as a foreign nursing student has been below what I had expected as what the news media potrays. The media and reality on the ground can not be further apart.
    I always get the attitude that I am an outsider and people jump to the conclusion I am an immigrant. Funny though, this is very incorrect. I am spending hard earned forex in the economic system, which I can't afford to through down the drain. However my classmates don't understand, and behave like how can this alien be coming tops in class.
    Be ready for resentments different treatment from colleagues as compared to when they deal with so called 'natives'.
    Not to say there aren't people who will be true friends and be helpful and not ask 'where are you from?' and close the conversation.
    All in all, I do not though it will be any different from working or visisting any foreign country.
  2. by   clee1
    If he/she speaks English well enough to be understood, and takes care of his/her patients, welcome aboard.
  3. by   MS._Jen_RN
    The only reservation I have about working with foreign nurses is the potential communication barrier. I worked with a nurse from Nigeria who had a large communication problem. I am usually good at understanding people from other countries and regions. She spoke very thickly accented poor english. I had a very difficult time understanding her. The patients had it worse, many being hard of hearing. She also had a very hard time understanding us sometimes. To make it worse, often she would just nod even though she didn't know what you had said. I guess my advise is this- work hard on your english communication skills, make sure the patients understand what you are saying, and if you don't understand something someone is telling you, ask for clarification.
    You will be a great nurse. Good luck, we'd be happy to have you in SE Michigan.
  4. by   Euskadi1946
    C'mon over Lucinka I think you will do just great. I've worked with nurses from India, Iran, Bosnia, Russia and South America and they were all wonderful to work with and had so much knowledge to share. When I floated to NICU one night a nurse from India who was educated in England was really nice to me showing me the ins and outs of the NICU and she was so gentle with those tiny little people.
  5. by   nj1grlcrus
    Come to the New York area, you will love it, and you might even have to translate for the nurses here, we have many patients that speak YOUR language.
  6. by   AlisonBSN
    I haven't read the whole thread, so I don't know if anyone has said this but:

    There are so many foreign people in nursing already that nobody thinks anything of it. I work with several foreign nurses. Two nurses from Africa, several from the Phillippines, and from all over really. I love asking them annoying questions about where they're from.
  7. by   EwaM
    Hello,
    I am not a nurse but have been planning on going to a nursing school. I am Polish and was wondering what state you are in and if you have any contact information to the Polish girl you are describing??

    Thanks a lot,

    Ewa
  8. by   cicada
    I'm European, successfully working in US for 11 years and relocating to Canada soon. I think you'll be treated the same as you'll treat your patients and co-workers. Language will improve quickly in English speaking surroundings and you'll get a great experience in the US. Welcome!!!
  9. by   AuntieRN
    3 of my most favorite nurses at work....actually one of them was my preceptor when I first graduated and started working at the hospital as an RN and one of them is actually an instructor for the program I graduated from (I never had her in school though) are all from the Phillipines...they are awesome...who cares where you are from as long as you can take care of your pts in the manner they should be taken care of...good luck to you!!!
  10. by   lucinka
    Many thanks to you for all your supportive words. I am looking forward to my new carreer more and more. I am glad you have no prejudices and I promise if I will met somebody from Czech republic I will not speak in the work in czech with him or her
    lucinka
  11. by   cicada
    Lucinka,
    I can be wrong but you can not speak language other than English in a healthcare facility. Unless you are asked to do so--to translate, to speak with the patient who does not understand English, etc. But no chatting in your own language! Nobody will like it + it's against many healthcare facilities policies. You'll be surprised how many rules you need to follow, but be wise and follow all of them. Good luck!
  12. by   ShayRN
    Quote from cicada
    Lucinka,
    I can be wrong but you can not speak language other than English in a healthcare facility. Unless you are asked to do so--to translate, to speak with the patient who does not understand English, etc. But no chatting in your own language! Nobody will like it + it's against many healthcare facilities policies. You'll be surprised how many rules you need to follow, but be wise and follow all of them. Good luck!

    This must be a facility policy. I don't see how any institution can enforce something like this. We have doctors speak to each other in their native language, would this apply to them as well? I would imagine if it isn't affecting patient care (although it may be considered rude) it may actually be considered discrimiantion to prohibit people from talking in their native language. I wouldn't want to travel down that path.
  13. by   PralineLPN
    I've worked with European (Poland, Germany, Czech, etc) as well as African nurses before, and I have absolutely no problem with it. I find other cultures fascination, and I'm always willing to teach as long as you're willing to learn!
    Paul

    PS- about the speaking same lanuage thing, It's a facility thing. Ours doesn't care what you speak to each other, as long as you can communicate in English with the Patient. We have spanish, french, and a few other languages being spoken amongst our co-workers. I agree it would be discrimination. After all, It's a free country!
    Last edit by PralineLPN on Feb 3, '07

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