do you make sure your pts - page 6

Hello fellow nurses;-) my DH and I went to visit his mother in the hosp today...this was her 2nd day, dx dehydration. she is pleasant late 80s with pretty severe dementia. Very nice hospital,... Read More

  1. by   honeykrown
    On several occasions i have found myself combing pt's hair (even braiding grandma's hair, giving back rubs, putting vaseline on their lips and swabbing their mouths.

    When do i have time to do this, when i do my Q2 turns (you guessed right, these are my total care pt's or our really elderly). It takes me nothing to grab a brush and run it through their hair, while the aide is fluffing the pillow, i rub my hands around their back (30sec isn't too much). After the turn i wet the swab and run it through their mouth. Open the lip gloss and smack it over their lips. Its not too hard to ask for these stuff
  2. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from vashtee
    Caring for the sick should be a collaborative effort between staff and family members.
    oh, i sooo agree here.
    when my mom was dying (in icu), i did all her personal care, and only asked nurse for assist when i needed it.
    it was a very loving, bonding, intimate experience.

    that said, i do believe there are nurses who are too darned busy to provide basic hygiene 101...wash face, hands, comb hair.
    and that to me, is seriously pathetiuc.
    then there are the nurses who just don't find it priority, and let it slide...even more unthinkable.
    for me, i just couldn't look at my messy looking pt, and claim it as mine.
    i'm better than that.
    arrogant? perhaps. but i stand by it.

    Quote from mindlor
    And guess what, there will be far fewer lazy, inefficient, uncaring, cruel nurses that have jobs
    whoa bub...your aforementioned assessments better be on the mark...
    and that you KNOW that any negligence isn't r/t horrible staffing and unrealistic expectations.
    from my experience, there are far more overworked nurses, than there are lazy , cruel, and uncaring.
    proceed very carefully.

    leslie
  3. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from mindlor
    I am sure they exist, but as you said, I dont know ***** lol

    You got that right.
  4. by   nicenurselpn
    I work in a facility where usually the cnas have anywhere from 6 to 8 total care patients (depends on staffing and the unit). These kids get bathed (tub baths) every day and bad baths as well. Nail care is also supposed to be done as needed as well. Everyday I notice that nails arent trimmed down. I just grab a nail clipper and clip them myself. I also noticed that a child who is a mouth breather had dried toothpaste on her lips and teeth. She also has a very high arch in her palate. So I grabbed a handful to toothettes, wet them, and proceeded to clean off the toothpaste. When I got to cleaning the arch in her palate, I pulled out the largest goob of phelgmy goo I have ever seen. Long story short, the whole thing only took me about 5 minutes to do proper oral care for her, and her smiling at me when I was done was priceless.

    I know that we as nurses are busy, but it only takes a few minutes to make someone feel better.
  5. by   mindlor
    Bah the best thing I can do is finish up nursing school with my 4.0......become an awsome nurse and then become a manager, then who knows maybe someday we shall meet on the unit
  6. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from mindlor
    Bah the best thing I can do is finish up nursing school with my 4.0......become an awsome nurse and then become a manager, then who knows maybe someday we shall meet on the unit
    ...or a dark alley?

    leslie
  7. by   mindlor
    Quote from leslie :-D
    ...or a dark alley?

    leslie
    No way!! I dont go to dark allies!!! Too scary!!!! Too indefensible LOL
  8. by   kids
    Cleaning the crust off a defensless person's face is basic nursing care. It takes one minute to wash someone's face as part of another task. If care that basic is being skiped it makes me wonder what else is.

    And not doing oral care on someone who is dehydrated is just cruel.
  9. by   Florence NightinFAIL
    Quote from Esme12
    I don't want this to sound harsh but before I checked that I "check with and make sure that the docs, pharmacy, kitchen, OT, PT, SLP, X-ray, porter, houskeeping, TV, maintenance, security are doing their jobs" I would make sure my patient is clean, comfortable and cared for so I wouldn't have to "feel terrible"....just saying
    Each hospital/unit is different in terms of type & number of pts, support staff, acuity & staffing available. I don't know what kind of place you work at but sometimes - bedbaths and extra little stuff to make pts comfortable are the the last things on my list: if I have pain, stat/urgent doc orders, procedures etc. covered - then I can have time for the rest. But I can understand your point - I would never leave someone in an awful condition as the poster said - but I find a lot of pts/family members too fixated on the little stuff when I have bigger things to worry about.

    (I'm not talking about total care pts)

    [Edit to add: our hospital does not provide toothbrushes, toothpaste, combs, deodrant, razor. Pts have to bring them from home. We only have those spongy mouth swaps and non-alcohol rinse. So if someone doesn't bring those basics for the pt- what are we supposed to use?]
  10. by   anotherone
    Quote from mindlor
    We need more nurses like you Esme From what I can tell, these younger nurses tend to think they are all that and that basic human care like brushing teeth is beneath them, or that it is the techs job...and maybe it iss the techs job but sometimes the techs need a little help.

    .
    EXACTLY i do not wash patients because IT IS BENEATH ME. just like all the other young nurses on my floor, we are too busy with mcdreamy m.d, and mcsteamy, d.o. in the clean utility room while the techs and older nurses do everything........................................ .............
  11. by   caregiver1977
    I wish hospitals, nursing homes/LTC facilities, etc., would hire people like me to do things like this. This sounds a lot like what I do for my older relative that I do caregiving for. I would love to brush teeth, comb hair, wash faces, listen to their stories about what they did in the 50s/60s, etc., while your more experienced people do the specialized medical care.

    But with all the staffing problems you all talk about on this site, probably won't happen.
  12. by   Esme12
    Quote from Florence NightinFAIL
    Each hospital/unit is different in terms of type & number of pts, support staff, acuity & staffing available. I don't know what kind of place you work at but sometimes - bedbaths and extra little stuff to make pts comfortable are the the last things on my list: if I have pain, stat/urgent doc orders, procedures etc. covered - then I can have time for the rest. But I can understand your point - I would never leave someone in an awful condition as the poster said - but I find a lot of pts/family members too fixated on the little stuff when I have bigger things to worry about.

    (I'm not talking about total care pts)

    [Edit to add: our hospital does not provide toothbrushes, toothpaste, combs, deodrant, razor. Pts have to bring them from home. We only have those spongy mouth swaps and non-alcohol rinse. So if someone doesn't bring those basics for the pt- what are we supposed to use?]
    I hear what you are saying but....there is a person on the other end of those orders, procedures, meds and treaments. thinking breathing, feeling human beings. If someone like you was caring for your Mom and you came in to find her in a dirty bed, crusty mouth and dirty face...how would you feel? If you still feel justified that the personal care of your patient is the last on your list as well as the comfort of your patient (which can enhance the effectiveness of pain meds) then Ok. I am just asking for everyone to realize what's at stake here and that there is a real person underneath all your chores feeling sick, frighten and alone that could use a little TLC.

    I tell you what....I have cared for 11 patients with a LPN and rarely an aide (acute care telemetry) that had mostly totals and a few heavy assists. My patients were bathed, cleaned and cared for. It was the EXPECTATION not the EXCEPTION. If I had to do a bath at 2 PM then so be it......but they were bathed. You need to be organized and effecient. Is it hard YES....does it stink sometimes? YES....but I never let my patients suffer for the lacking moralities of the facilty. I would wet face cloths and place them in a baggie and as I passed my afternoon meds or as I passed trays I would offer them to freshen their face and hands. Admittedly it has not gotten me anything material, but I am rich in my heart. Peace.
  13. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from Esme12
    It was the EXPECTATION not the EXCEPTION. If I had to do a bath at 2 PM then so be it......but they were bathed. You need to be organized and effecient. Is it hard YES....does it stink sometimes? YES....but I never let my patients suffer for the lacking moralities of the facilty. I would wet face cloths and place them in a baggie and as I passed my afternoon meds or as I passed trays I would offer them to freshen their face and hands. Admittedly it has not gotten me anything material, but I am rich in my heart. Peace.
    thank you, esme.
    i share your "EXPECTATIONS"...
    even if there was emergency after emergency, at some time i'd make sure pts were washed...
    even if it entailed leaving late without the extra pay.
    to me, a pt's feeling of well being, is right up there with attending a code.

    it has nothing to do with being/feeling "morally superior" (yes wooh, i'm thinking of you.)...
    it is how i have defined myself as the nurse i want to be.
    i'm glad i'm not alone.

    leslie

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