Do you feel more people are entering nursing only to become APRN's? - page 6

I am not a nurse yet, but I'm an EMT, have worked in and around the hospital, and I am currently finishing my last two prerequisite courses before applying for ABSN programs. It seems like 90% of my... Read More

  1. by   operations
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Believe me, it has nothing to do with treating new grads better. These folks are boasting that they're applying to an NP program or only looking for ICU experience to get into anesthesia school before they've spent even a single day on the unit.
    Actually I just noticed this. I worked on CCU and everyone there had plans of going somewhere else. It is fine and all, but I remember one new grad that was terrible with foleys at first and always needed (me, the tech) to help or take over. Within months she is being accepted to CNA school. I had no clue they could get in that quickly... But she did, and suddenly she was the holy queen God, correcting everyone as if she was so exceptional and talented... You can manage to handle putting a tube in a bladder how you gonna manage putting one in lungs?
  2. by   Rekt
    Quote from operations
    Actually I just noticed this. I worked on CCU and everyone there had plans of going somewhere else. It is fine and all, but I remember one new grad that was terrible with foleys at first and always needed (me, the tech) to help or take over. Within months she is being accepted to CNA school. I had no clue they could get in that quickly... But she did, and suddenly she was the holy queen God, correcting everyone as if she was so exceptional and talented... You can manage to handle putting a tube in a bladder how you gonna manage putting one in lungs?
    CNA school is actually really easy to get into. I am surprised she worked as a RN then CNA, very interesting career choice.
  3. by   operations
    Quote from Susie2310
    BSN level knowledge needed to take care of complex patients at a tertiary care center?? May I ask what you perceive are the components in BSN nurses education that make nurses with a BSN better qualified to take care of complex patients than ADN/Diploma nurses? I ask genuinely, as a nurse with an ADN and a BSN. You do know that nurses with an ADN/Diploma take care of complex patients? Tertiary care isn't rocket science.
    You learn ethics etc. Technically, your ticket into nursing is Nclex stamp of approval. I truly believe BSN does not make you that much better of a nurse, but it does make you more rounded professional/leader. Most hospitals don't care about BSN as much as you would think. They may request you earn the bachelors within a couple years
    Last edit by operations on Sep 15
  4. by   operations
    Quote from Rekt
    CNA school is actually really easy to get into. I am surprised she worked as a RN then CNA, very interesting career choice.
    Actually it should have been CRNA school. I could not edit the post in time. Sorry lol
  5. by   SurfCA40
    Quote from Rekt
    CNA school is actually really easy to get into. I am surprised she worked as a RN then CNA, very interesting career choice.
    Lol...
  6. by   elkpark
    Quote from CKPM2RN
    Let's see...enter a BSN program...pay 25-35k for said program...work another 10 years after that. I'd rather not since it doesn't pencil out well.
    Gee, I wouldn't do that, either. But there are many options for BSN completion that don't cost nearly that much. I don't recall how much I paid when I went through the BSN completion program at the nearest state university to me (many years ago), but I do recall that I was able to pay for it out of pocket easily, comfortably, as I went (while continuing to work full-time). I just Googled the school to see what the program costs these days, and the university nursing program website states that the average total cost for the BSN completion program (for in-state tuition), including textbooks, is $5,700. I'm sure there are additional costs that come up over the duration of the program, but not enough to get anywhere close to $25k. $6k "penciled out" over ten years doesn't look bad to me.
  7. by   operations
    Quote from SurfCA40
    Lol...
    Really? That's actually pretty pathetic. If you read the post you wouldn't need to be told I was talking about CRNA. Like I literally described the role. How juvinille.
  8. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    And I don't think people are treated poorly on the floor. I think many of those new grads aren't used to a situation in which they aren't coddled. Asking a new grad to work nights, weekends or holidays is not poor treatment, yet I've been on the receiving end of phone calls from their parents demanding that they be given "better schedules" because "working nights is cruel and inhuman treatment." Being corrected when you goof up is not poor treatment. Yet I've had orientees who will not accept ANY negative feedback as anything other than "bullying."

    People who go looking for poor treatment, bullying or NETY will always find it -- even if it isn't there. Nursing schools and even forums like this one prime new grads to go looking for it.
    Their PARENTS are calling to complain about their schedules? Shouldn't you have to be an adult to be a nurse? That is the most pathetic thing I've heard in a while.
  9. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Not kidding; not even a little bit. My manager had a call not long ago from an irate father who threatened to "have your job" if Susie wasn't given a pass on working the holidays because it was very important to HIS career to have a hostess for all of his holiday entertaining, and since his divorce, Susie was his hostess.
    Then maybe Dad should just support little Susie so someone else could have her job.
  10. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from Rekt
    I guess they don't teach sarcasm in ADN school.
    They must not, because I missed it too. My reaction was the same as Susie's.
  11. by   Boomer MS, RN
    Quote from Rekt
    CNA school is actually really easy to get into. I am surprised she worked as a RN then CNA, very interesting career choice.
    CNA (Certified Nurse Assistant) school is not the same as a CRNA (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthesia) program. All CRNA programs are extremely competitive graduate nursing programs. It is highly unlikely that any licensed RN would enroll in a program to become a CNA. This is not to disparage any CNAs, also valuable members of the healthcare team.
  12. by   Rekt
    Quote from Boomer MS, RN
    CNA (Certified Nurse Assistant) school is not the same as a CRNA (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthesia) program. All CRNA programs are extremely competitive graduate nursing programs. It is highly unlikely that any licensed RN would enroll in a program to become a CNA. This is not to disparage any CNAs, also valuable members of the healthcare team.
    I am aware of that, that's why I thought it was an interesting career choice to go from RN to CNA.
  13. by   wrongwaydianne
    Quote from SurfCA40
    I am not a nurse yet, but I'm an EMT, have worked in and around the hospital, and I am currently finishing my last two prerequisite courses before applying for ABSN programs. It seems like 90% of my current classmates in nursing prerequisite courses, along with other prospective nurses I've worked with, are entering the nursing profession with the goal of become a Nurse Practitioner or CRNA.

    Do you, especially those already working as nurses, feel a lot of new graduate nurses are entering nursing for the sole purpose of becoming an APRN? I feel like since APRN's are gaining more popularity, people are entering the nursing field to become an APRN and not a "nurse", in lieu of becoming an MD/DO or PA. I'm not saying more education is bad, but it seems like people want to be an NP, not a nurse, if that makes sense. Which leads me to believe (and I know it's been discussed before) a huge over saturation of APRN's is in the near future.

    Thoughts? Again, I'm not a nurse yet, so I could be completely off base.

    What you think is never off base. You're making an opinion statement based on your observations. I've been an RN for over 40 years. Just an RN, doing what I love which is bedside nursing. I noted this trend long ago and wondered how someone who's never been "in the trenches" could acquire enough gut instinct, which we all get with time. My neice just graduated and is on that track right now. Everyone has to follow their own path. I wish you luck in your education, never let anyone with more education put you down. I've been told I was "just a nurse" by a doctor who paralyzed a vented patient who was set to breath 4 X a minute by the machine, he was being weaned, and I had to ask the MD to raise his respiratory rate, and he sincerely apologized to me. We are all valuable especially doing what we do. I sense a very good future RN who will touch many lives. Dianne

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