Do you ever correct people about medical stuff? - page 9

by mappers

15,197 Views | 110 Comments

I'm not talking about patient education, I'm just talking about general conversation. I hear people get things wrong medically all the time, but I rarely correct people. For example, a relative said the other day that she... Read More


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    Quote from mappers
    Do I question or correct them when it is a non-clinical, causal type setting? NO! It's rude and inappropriate, but I privately wonder how well they were educated about their conditions, by their providers. I then think about my practice and how well I'm educating my patients.
    ah...ok.
    i thought we were talking only about non-clinical, casual settings.
    that is what i based my answer on.
    regardless, a great response to my question.
    thank you.

    Quote from RNdynamic
    Not always is the gist adequately conveyed if people are using the wrong terms for certain illnesses. Years ago, AIDS was called the "gay cancer," an offensive term for a disease that is not the same as actual cancer.
    yes, "gay cancer" is undoubtedly an offensive, ignorant response...
    but i am still not certain how i would respond in a "non-clinical, casual setting".
    because when AIDS came to this country, it was thought to be mainly transmitted by homosexual men, AND it was pretty much a terminal sentence way back when.
    so although AIDS is not a cancer, i do understand a layman's perception of its similarities.

    unless the person is a patient, i try not to correct anyone as it makes ME feel petty.
    i have seen (thankfully, only a small handful) people that readily correct others.
    in a nutshell, it makes them appear obnoxious, imo.
    but again, with a patient or pt's family member, like mappers/op, education is key.

    leslie
  2. 3
    Quote from OCNRN63
    Stomach bug, maybe? I don't think the average person is going to say they have gastroenteritis.
    It is true that it isn't a flu, though.


    Yeah, I do know that that flu is short for influenza, but again, if I understand what they are saying, does it really matter? IMO it doesn't and I'm ok with that.
    I'm not going to correct the elderly who have been saying stomach flu for the last 70 plus years of their life. I have enough trouble explaining other things.

    The last time a pt heard they had a 'stomach bug' from the CNA, the pt really thought they had bugs in their stomach! I think I will stick to the stomach flu. I'm picking my battles on this one.
    .
    SleeepyRN, leslie :-D, and beckyboo1 like this.
  3. 0
    Quote from tokmom
    I guess I'm not going to correct the elderly who have been saying stomach flu for the last 70 plus years of their life. I have enough trouble explaining other things.

    The last time a pt heard they had a 'stomach bug' from the CNA, the pt really thought they had bugs in their stomach! I think I will stick to the stomach flu. I'm picking my battles on this one, lol.

    Yeah, I do know that that flu is short for influenza, but again, if I understand what they are saying, does it really matter? IMO it doesn't and I'm ok with that.
    I agree EXCEPT if people are confusing stomach flu with influenza.

    Which, in the debate over an annual flu shot, gets brought up all the time. ("I got a flu shot and then got the stomach flu so the shot doesn't work"). So yeah, then I correct folks.

    But I say "stomach flu" or "tummy flu". Maybe we should just say "norovirus".
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    My family members, bless their collective hearts, know NOTHING about medicine or healthcare (save my cousin who is an LPN but hasn't worked in a direct patient care role for years). We are backwoods, country people. My mother was the first one born in a hospital and she isn't the oldest child. I think you're getting the picture.

    So, yes, I correct, because that is the only way they will learn. But it's a two way street...

    For example, my grandmother knows much more about what to do with a sick baby or child because she raised so many without medical intervention unless they were actually bleeding or broken! So I'm fairly homeopathic about those things thanks to her. I see it as the generations helping each other out in that case.

    My dad, uncles, cousins, etc., - at least one of them can fix ANY problem with my house or car. They don't feel bad telling me I have done something silly in regards to my plumbing or whatnot. So I don't feel bad telling them certain things. And now I've become fairly self sufficient.

    I guess those cases are informing people. But this is about correction, isn't it? Whoops, first day here and already prattling on...

    My husband. Well. He is a social worker (with congenital hydrocephalus and a VP shunt) whose mother is a former medical records manager (with a history of MI, CABG, CEA and CKD) so he and his family are the reason the phrase "a little knowledge can be dangerous" exists! I have to correct him constantly, but I see it as not only my spousal duty, but as a lifesaving measure, considering his personal and family histories.

    He is a good learner and a good listener, thank the Heavens, but it's hilarious sometimes to hear his outlook on how things work in the hospital, or in the human body. He works strictly with MRDD patients, medically stable. (No, Mike, we can't give the 80 something whose family should make her a comfort care patient a LUNG TRANSPLANT and fix her and no, her insurance doesn't discharge her.)
    SoldierNurse22, Altra, Hygiene Queen, and 1 other like this.
  5. 0
    I always have pronounced de-breed, and have always heard it pronounced that way. But my father in law is a podiatrist, and he says it to rhyme with bride. Therefore my husband says it that way too. Although I suppose it must be an alternative pronunciation, it ,akes me bonkers.
  6. 0
    Quote from Esnooopy
    I always have pronounced de-breed, and have always heard it pronounced that way. But my father in law is a podiatrist, and he says it to rhyme with bride. Therefore my husband says it that way too. Although I suppose it must be an alternative pronunciation, it ,akes me bonkers.
    Now, different pronunciations . . that's a bird of a different feather.

    In school, each of my teachers had a different way of pronouncing medical terms. Some of the grew up back East, some in the South, some here. So, I can cut them some slack on that.
  7. 1
    Quote from FlorenceFrightengale
    .

    I guess those cases are informing people. But this is about correction, isn't it? Whoops, first day here and already prattling on...
    Welcome - I enjoyed your post!
    FlorenceFrightengale likes this.
  8. 2
    Quote from sapphire18
    Except for the time I found out a coworker was taking 5-5.5g of Tylenol a day (non-nurse). :/
    Wow!! Yep, sounds like that was a great time to speak up!
  9. 0
    I correct fellow nurses and doctors quite a bit when they are talking about something grossly outlandish that they know nothing about, have not kept up with current practice, or are just plain wrong possibly leading to patient harm. I will have a conversation when someone (layperson) has false information and remember, it is not what you say but HOW you say it. If they think that I am a know-it-all, too bad. If they do not believe me, they can go look it up.
  10. 0
    Quote from mappers
    I'm not talking about patient education, I'm just talking about general conversation. I hear people get things wrong medically all the time, but I rarely correct people. For example, a relative said the other day that she thought her mother just had a kidney infection but then "We found out it was E. Coli! " I didn't have the heart to tell her we all have E. coli in our guts and most kidney infections are E. coli.I have a patient who also goes to my church. He tells everyone he has bladder cancer. He really has prostate cancer with mets to the bladder. This happens a lot with "bone" and "liver" cancer as well. I hear people say "so and so" had breast cancer and now they have "bone" cancer. Well, they most likely have bone mets, not bone cancer.Normally, unless the person is seeking information from me or I'm in the clinical setting, I just keep my mouth shut. I figure I don't want to be an obnoxious know-it-all and, since I don't know the whole situation, I don't have all the facts. What about you?
    I always do. I don't go around perpetuating ignorance so I must!

    Sorry that wasn't in response to your post. It was supposed to be in response to the original post!


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