Do you cut corners in your daily nursing practice? - page 11

by madwife2002 23,844 Views | 109 Comments Senior Moderator

Do you cut corners in your daily nursing practice? Or do you do everything according to the ‘book’. Do you police yourself in your everyday care of a patient, what do I mean by police yourself? I mean always follow the correct... Read More


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    I feel like it is impossible to NOT cut corners in this profession. I'm a PCA, and having 10-12 patients, I sometimes have to cut corners. I don't want to, but I'm forced.
  2. 0
    Quote from monkeybug
    Secret shoppers? Are you freakin' kidding me? Once more, some suit trying to turn healthcare into retail. I wash my hands, a lot. Between every patient contact. But often I wash them in the hall because families like to pile crap on the sinks. If it's a family that has made a point of making me wash in front of them, then I happily dribble my soapy germy water in their Coach purses, open cups, make up cases, or whatever else they've piled around. We didn't have gel in the rooms, only in the halls, and I utilized that often, too. Our infection rate, when I worked in the hospital, was very good, too. One of the few areas we got praise regularly. Amazing, since most of us washed in the hall or nurses station.
    We don't have sinks in the med nurses station or hallways. ONLY in the clean/dirty utility rooms, med rooms and pt rooms. I'm happy for your infection rate. Good for you.
    As for the secret shoppers. Yeah, kind of an anal idea, but look at it this way. Wouldn't you want the nurse being busted for never washing her hands? What if she was taking care of your family members? This specific nurse was going from an active MRSA room without washing and was stopped going into an immediate room next door to a surgical pt.
  3. 1
    Quote from RNfaster
    Paco-RN - check this out regarding C diff being airborne...

    The Potential for Airborne Dispersal of Clostridium difficile from Symptomatic Patients - "Conclusions. Aerosolization of C. difficile occurs commonly but sporadically in patients with symptomatic CDI."

    Airborne Spread of Clostridium difficile.
    This is very interesting, I stand corrected, thank you! No mention of this was ever made to me in school or where I work. C. diff patients are regularly left in double rooms, although isolation precautions are in place, why is this? Also, if airborne, why aren't masks required??

    And who says you can't learn anything on allnurses
    tokmom likes this.
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    I cut corners daily. Of course that article was written by a manager who probably implemented a dozen additional tasks to her staff causing them to cut corners.
    Fiona59 and MsBruiser like this.
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    Quote from getmethisnownurse
    I cut corners daily. Of course that article was written by a manager who probably implemented a dozen additional tasks to her staff causing them to cut corners.
    Yes it is true It is an article written by a manager, who often works side by side with her staff but who also has to make sure corners are not cut, in my place of work there is often good rationale behind what we are expected to do.

    I was also a floor nurse until 3 years ago, and where I worked you did not cut corners unless you wanted to lose your job.
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    If nurses didn't cut corners then everything we did would never be on time and there would always be overtime...., I think cutting corners on small things is ok, it's the big things we need to worry about not cutting corners.
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    Quote from madwife2002
    Yes it is true It is an article written by a manager, who often works side by side with her staff but who also has to make sure corners are not cut, in my place of work there is often good rationale behind what we are expected to do.

    I was also a floor nurse until 3 years ago, and where I worked you did not cut corners unless you wanted to lose your job.
    Cut them every way and in every way. You cannot constantly heap more work on someone's plate without taking something away. "Managers" like yourself are the easiest to deal with. Make the charting nice and neat, the patients happy - and the corners will be cut, and cut, and cut. Easy. And then the mangers go their meetings, and run around with their clipboards, and propose more idiotic work - and the corners will continue to be cut over and over and over again. I probably work where you work. Or rather, there are lots of nurses like myself. We keep our mouths shut, the charting complete, and shake our heads and laugh. Yep, no corners cut in your hospital! Wouldn't be a post worthy of this site without a few of these:
    Fiona59 likes this.
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    Yep lots of meetings which drive me crazy, but a lot of protocols and procedures which are in place in the recent few years are actually mandated by the government or medicare.

    Medicare want to cut payments to health care facilities, by improving care and reducing hospital re-admissions. So they have tightened the rules and if a hospital wants to survive financially then they have no choice but to tighten the care they are providing.
    Unfortunately for you and me this all comes down to how we manage our care, reducing infections and decreasing hospital re-admission rates for which we are penalized.

    Now you might say we cannot meet these strict requirements and we have to cut corners, but if your floor has repeated re-admissions for hospital acquired infections or an increase in UTI's from catheters then you are going see somebody somewhere coming down like a ton of bricks and investigations will be underway.

    At the end of the day I dont know about you but I actually need my job, I work so hard with my staff to focus on what we can do to improve care and reduce infections. Please dont assume that all managers are the same, there are some out there who really care and work hard.
    tokmom likes this.
  9. 4
    First to the OP....I am 99.99 percent certain that corners are being cut in your facility....you just dont know it.

    Myself? I cut corners each and every shift. I have to. No on has died yet, thank God..

    At a staff meeting I put it out there that the infection control nurse and the wound care nurse should be required to each work one week on the floor next month. The idea was met with disdain......but clearly these people have lost touch with reality.

    Our nurse educator herself, she told me, listen, nurses know that each shift they may have 100 things to get done. They are only going to do 70 or 80. The art of nursing is knowing which 70 or 80 to do.

    Now sadly, our charting system forces us to chart on all 100 things. But, that is another thread....yes?
    Fiona59, wooh, BrandonLPN, and 1 other like this.
  10. 1
    Quote from madwife2002
    Yep lots of meetings which drive me crazy, but a lot of protocols and procedures which are in place in the recent few years are actually mandated by the government or medicare.

    Medicare want to cut payments to health care facilities, by improving care and reducing hospital re-admissions. So they have tightened the rules and if a hospital wants to survive financially then they have no choice but to tighten the care they are providing.
    Unfortunately for you and me this all comes down to how we manage our care, reducing infections and decreasing hospital re-admission rates for which we are penalized.

    Now you might say we cannot meet these strict requirements and we have to cut corners, but if your floor has repeated re-admissions for hospital acquired infections or an increase in UTI's from catheters then you are going see somebody somewhere coming down like a ton of bricks and investigations will be underway.

    At the end of the day I dont know about you but I actually need my job, I work so hard with my staff to focus on what we can do to improve care and reduce infections. Please dont assume that all managers are the same, there are some out there who really care and work hard.

    I came to nursing as a second career, and I notice something that many RN(s) don't - nurses have an unerring ability to make their lives difficult. Many times what they perceive as a "mandate" can be solved with a small checkbox - but they will create a multitude of needless forms and paperwork. When attempting to streamline said paperwork, management will throw up their hands and say, "The Joint Commission told us to do it!"

    Furthermore, if today's focus is UTI(s) and other preventable readmissions, something will have to give. And it will give...
    wooh likes this.


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