Do you actually wear gloves/gowns/masks ? - page 4

I am a second-semester nursing student, and just finished my first clinical rotation at a local hopsital. I know that nursing school is different from the real world, and that working nurses will do things differently from what... Read More

  1. 8
    Quote from nicole109
    Furthermore, it is the policy of the facility that I was employeed at (one of the largest, and most well known in the country), that when transporting an isolation patient, that no PPE is to be worn in the hallways, so if we aren't to be wearing it in the hallways, then really how important is it to wear it into the patients room if you are only going in there to speak to the patient and not touch them, or check and IV pump? Just being honest...
    It's vitally important, because the germs know when they're in the patient's room and when they're in the hallway. They only jump off the bed when it's in a room. They immediately go dormant when you're pushing the bed down the hall ungowned.
    RN BSN 2009, BreatheFree, RNMLIS, and 5 others like this.

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  2. 2
    Quote from SteffersRN87
    If the patient is in contact precautions, you must wear a GOWN and GLOVES (no exceptions)! What docs do is there business, and I do correct them without hesitation. Just FYI, I had a co-worker that was fired when an infection control RN caught her giving a cup of pills to a patient without a gown on... People are watching!
    I had a surgeon scream bloody murder at me once for telling him to gown up before going in to see a patient. He was NOT going to do it.

    I blocked him from going in..he tried the "I'm going to your NM, administration." line, and I told him, "Go ahead. You're still not going in this room without a gown."

    Eventually, he caved....

    I think it was more of a "woman-telling-a-man-what-to-do-thing" I must've reminded him of his wife....(ugh)....
    Nepenthe Sea and mamamerlee like this.
  3. 4
    In Sweden we rarely use masks. Nowadays with the "new flu" scare people are a bit more paranoid though.

    Gowns and gloves must be used when handling "dirty" stuff (making a bed, changing and such), not for just entering a room with a "normal" patient. If the patient is isolated (unknown diarrhoea, c.diff, MRSA etc) gloves and gowns must be used at all times.

    Hands desinfected prior to and after each patient. Handwashing is not recommended generally because it dries out your hands. The handdesinfectant is moisturizing.

    Work clothes are supplied by the hospital and must not be used outside the hospital compound. I can't imagine getting into my care or the subway with my "filthy" work clothes. Yikes. Shoes are not hospital issue, but cannot be used outside the hospital either.
    angelfaceLPN, Nepenthe Sea, morte, and 1 other like this.
  4. 1
    Quote from JoPACURN
    I had a surgeon scream bloody murder at me once for telling him to gown up before going in to see a patient. He was NOT going to do it.

    I blocked him from going in..he tried the "I'm going to your NM, administration." line, and I told him, "Go ahead. You're still not going in this room without a gown."

    Eventually, he caved....

    I think it was more of a "woman-telling-a-man-what-to-do-thing" I must've reminded him of his wife....(ugh)....
    I remember early on as a student having a pt who had a horrible infection following a compound fracture of his leg. His orthopod rounded on him between OR cases-no gown, bare hands, in his scrubs...AAAHHH!
    Nepenthe Sea likes this.
  5. 3
    Quote from nicole109
    You are asking for an honest answer, I want to know how many of you wear PPE in the grocery store, or to the gym or send your children to school with PPE? These people do come from the community, and they do return to the community with MRSA, VRE, etc. I'm not condoning entering rooms without PPE, however, there has got to be a time that you have entered a room without a gown on. I worked in a hospital for 4 years, and have been tested (both swabbed and blood cultured) for all of the "bugs" and have never come back positive, and I lived by common sense. I always put gloves on when coming into contact with an isolation patient, and gowned when getting personal with them in terms of assessment, peroneal care, etc. Most of the times their isolation was contained though, if they were c-diff, they had an FMS, if it was in their urine, they had a foley, a wound, it was dressed; etc. I now work in homecare, and I know that I come in contact all the time with patients who would be on isolation, and do not gown up when entering their home, because I wouldn't gown if I encountered them in the community. I wouldn't even know, and neither would anyone else unless it was tattooed on their forehead! Furthermore, it is the policy of the facility that I was employeed at (one of the largest, and most well known in the country), that when transporting an isolation patient, that no PPE is to be worn in the hallways, so if we aren't to be wearing it in the hallways, then really how important is it to wear it into the patients room if you are only going in there to speak to the patient and not touch them, or check and IV pump? Just being honest...
    When I'm at the grocery store, I don't stop off to visit several immunocompromised patients on the way home. PPE is to protect your PATIENTS from YOU and having infections spread to your other patients (as well as to protect you). Most of my work is in ICU and transplant floor - there's no way I would want to think that I was responsible for giving one of my vulnerable patients VRE, acinetobacter, C. diff. etc.

    Those who make the informed decision NOT to glove/gown, well you can take the consequences. But don't use "common sense" as a rationale - of course we aren't eradicating every pathogen, but it's a hell of a lot better than doing nothing due to whatever slacker reason.
  6. 0
    Quote from chicookie
    Honestly, if I am going in there real quick to ask something and its a contact room, I am not going to gown up. The doctors don't do it, why should I?
    if its airborne its a different story. Then yeah I do all of it. But for contact unless I am going in there to mess with the patient then yes I will.
    This I understand, and have done the same. But I am talking about someone who has MRSA and is on contact AND droplet precautions (pt. had pneumonia), and when I first encountered this patient, the nurses were giving a bath with gloves only.
  7. 0
    Personally and honestly, I always wear the apropriate PPE when I am at work because I do not want to transmit microorganisms to the other patients in the ER that I work in. Besides I am protecting myself and my family. Just because something doesn't affect me, whose to say that I children won't be affected.
  8. 1
    Quote from nerdtonurse?

    We had a Noro outbreak, and I was told that contact plus standard was enough. I also used my N95 and went in with splatter protection. Of all the "dirty nurses" who worked the outbreak, I alone didn't get sick, so my "extra PPE" that our infection control nurse said wasn't necessary....apparently was.
    I believe you. I didn't use a mask the last time I was in a room with two nursing home patients that had it. Less than 48 hr later, I was sick too even though I had been super careful with gloves, and handwashing. Apparently, it was not enough...

    http://microbiology.mtsinai.on.ca/faq/norwalkfaq.shtml

    Quote from microbiology.mtsinai.on.ca
    Norwalk and Noroviruses are transmitted primarily by the fecal-oral route. Having direct contact with vomit or feces from an infected person and then transferring the virus to the mouth from the hands primarily spreads the viruses. Secondary person-to-person transmission through sharing food, water, and/or utensils, or contact with the contaminated environment is also possible. Touching a contaminated door knob and/or stair railing and then touching your mouth is a possible method of transmission. In some outbreaks, there is evidence that the virus may be spread by the airborne route. These viruses are very contagious and only a few are needed to cause an illness.

    The disease is transmitted through ingestion of contaminated foods and drinks, or by contact with an infected individual. Shellfish from waters exposed to raw sewage will concentrate virus particles from the water since they are filter feeders. Contaminated water can also introduce the virus to beverages, ice, eggs, fruits, and salad ingredients. Cooked foods may also be contaminated though handling by an infected individual. The virus can also be transmitted through close contact with an infected individual and/or touching contaminated surfaces.
    http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/ehs/Docs/Evi...like_Virus.pdf

    Quote from www.cdc.gov
    An outbreak of gastroenteritis followed a meal in a large hotel during which one of the diners vomited. The clinical features of the illness suggested Norwalk-like virus (NLV, small round structured virus) infection, and this was confirmed by electron microscopy and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) of stool samples. Further characterization of the virus by nucleotide sequence analysis of the PCR amplicons revealed identical strains in all the affected individuals. The foods served at the meal could not be demonstrated to be the cause of the outbreak. Analysis of attack rates by dining table showed an inverse relationship with the distance from the person who vomited. No one eating in a separate restaurant reported illness. Transmission from person-to-person or direct contamination of food seems unlikely in this outbreak. However, the findings are consistent with airborne spread of NLV with infection by inhalation with subsequent ingestion of virus particles.
    RN BSN 2009 likes this.
  9. 0
    If there are precautions to be taken, then they should be taken. You are correct in that hired nurses do not usually follow the precaution standards and it usually does take either a student or a family member to point it out. Then, if you're lucky, they might roll their eyes and either follow the policy or they may just tell you "Yeah, that's what they teach you but it's different in the real world." Regardless, set the example and follow the rules. It's protecting everybody and isn't that one of the things that nursing is all about?
  10. 0
    For what it is worth - Follow your training, disciplinary action by the hospital or your board will not consider the actions of others, only your action - same logic as all practices, would you risk patient, visitor, or your own health by non compliance of other basic practices? If supplies are an issue call your infection control nurse, as far as the compliance of others - do not even go there- not your issue unless you are charge or infection control..


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