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indigo girl

indigo girl

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indigo girl specializes in Too many to list.

making myself useful until I can go back to the Source

indigo girl's Latest Activity

  1. indigo girl

    H5N1, Bird Flu Updates

    Israel: Cats Infected With H5N1 Influenza can infect both birds and mammals. Consuming a meal of an infected bird or animal uncooked will lead to illness and probable death for mammals including humans. There is quite a history of animals being infected if you read some of these links. The point to remember is that bird flu mostly infects birds but other species are susceptible as well. I remember being very surprised when I read of this occurring in Indonesia when Dr. Andrew Jeremijenko found virus in a feral kitten while he was working for NAMRU 2 (the US Naval research station there). He was testing the birds and, only tested the cat out of curiosity. What do you know? The kitty was positive. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v440/n7081/full/440135a.html http://scienceblogs.com/effectmeasure/2006/08/questions_raised_by_latest_ind.php
  2. indigo girl

    H5N1, Bird Flu Updates

    Should we fear avian H5N1 influenza? Should we fear avian H5N1 influenza?
  3. indigo girl

    Fecal Transplants- What do you think about this?

    Via NGT? Wow!
  4. indigo girl

    Fecal Transplants- What do you think about this?

    Thanks for the link to the previous thread. Good info there. I really find this very interesting as I keep seeing home care patients coming out of the hospital with this problem.
  5. http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/12/fecal-transplants-work/ This link is from Wired, and the author is a respected science writer also writing on this topic in Scientific American (I like her a whole bunch), and lets face it, C diff is REALLY difficult to treat so this is worth a read. Once you get past the yuck factor, it makes sense... http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=swapping-germs (Thank you Mike at Avian Flu Diary and Maryn McKenna. This is amazing!)
  6. indigo girl

    Working 12-14 hour days, am burning out.......

    I hear you! I am in a very similiar situation working for a smaller agency with branches in other cities in this state. I have worked home health prior to Oasis. It is very different from my previous experience, and my patients are far sicker now. Hospitals are sending home patients that are still so very ill, and I have been told that the agency gets bad marks every time our patients get readamitted to the ER, so we have to really try very, very hard to keep them home like getting an order for IV diuretics, waiting for delivery of supplies, getting the IV started (hopefully we can start it), and monitoring them all in one visit or two so that they won't go into CHF? Hello? Is this realistic? I very much worry about being thrown under the bus in many situations. I had an SOC recently who had so many problems that were not on the referral form, and that there were no orders for (just one example of many). The hospital nurses sometimes are young and inexperienced. They don't always tell the coordinators the full range of problems that the patient has. Leaving out "a few things" like hemodialysis 3x per week, 4 lumens in substernum, pressure sores, no orders for flushing the J tube or the IV lumens, or the wound care. I did know that my patient had a recent transplant (not a kidney!), was on insulin, and that I had to teach the caregiver how to do tube feedings, and did I mention, the colostomy? Of course, the fact that the CG was in terrible pain from a back problem was not mentioned either. The provider for tube feeding equipment was royally upset when they found out about the central lines that might need flushes (patient has no money). We still don't know if dialysis is going to manage them or not. Very scarey! Then there is the hospitalist issue. Many do not allow access to them for orders, and "call the patient's PCP" is a standard answer from their staff if you can get an answer. Of course, some patients don't have a PCP. Frustrating? You bet! We all just want to take care of our patients and keep them safe, but this is very, very difficult. And yes, we do work many hours for "free". The hour it takes just to schedule the cases for the next day is a good example. You get most scheduled, and the ones who didn't answer the phone call back to say that there is a problem, and you have to juggle. Or you find out the next day when you are already in the field. I am all over the whole county, and spend lots of time traveling. Oncall usually every 3rd week for a week which I hate. Sometimes more often if one of us is on vacation. Maybe a bigger agency, better organized is the answer, and maybe not. Maybe it's just how things are everywhere. I truly don't know but I am fast approaching burn out.
  7. indigo girl

    H5N1, Bird Flu Updates

    WHO: Indonesian Bird Flu Update #7 http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2011/10/who-indonesian-bird-flu-update-7.html
  8. indigo girl

    Study: Calming the Cytokine Storm

    David and Goliath: How one cytokine may take down influenza http://www.virology.ws/2011/10/07/david-and-goliath-how-one-cytokine-may-take-down-influenza/ Even though you won't hear at the workplace about anything else other than flu vax or Tamiflu (after being infected, usually) that might be effective against influenza, this research has to be pointing in the right direction. This folks, is the wave of the future. And, none too soon because what we are doing now does not always work. We need this before the next pandemic hits which event certainly will occur in the not too distant future. Someday soon, I fervently hope, this will be big news, and if we are lucky,before we lose our current antiviral treatment, Tamiflu the way we lost amantadine. Everyone is aware already that the previous H1N1 strain of flu was resistant to Tamiflu? Did you know that right from the beginning of the swine flu pandemic, there were already strains resistant to it as well. That situation will only get worse. We need something really new. Just maybe, this is it.
  9. indigo girl

    Mapping Antibiotic Resistance

    cddep: mapping resistance http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2011/09/cddep-mapping-resistance.html
  10. So who is Robert Webster anyway, and why should we listen to him? Remember SARS, and how worrisome it was? No one knew where it came from or what to do about it. Webster is the guy who trained and mentored the scientists at the University of Hong Kong, who first figured out what kind of organism SARS was, and then where, and how people got infected. As Karl Taro Greenfeld documented in his compelling book, The China Syndrome, this was essential to stopping the virus from continuing to spread even further throughout the world. It had escaped already from China, traveled to Canada, and the US (yes, there were cases here too), as well as to other countries. This was a terrifying time especially for health care workers in places like Toronto, Vietnam, and Singapore. The repercussions of what happened to them while caring for the sick, are still with us today. Webster is an amazing man, and we owe much to him for what we know about influenza, the disease with the greatest potential for killing the most victims. Most people do not take influenza seriously, but it truly is an awesome adversary, and what happened in 1918 with over 50 million deaths could reoccur despite everything we know today about disease. We just cannot react fast enough with tracking, identifying, finding the source (sometimes we never do), producing vaccines, and figuring out how to treat the victims effectively. We are truly dependent upon the research of men and women like Webster, and owe them a hugh debt. It is not fearmongering to entertain the concept of bird flu spreading to the Americas. Why woudn't it come here? West Nile did, and so did SARS. These diseases can and do travel by plane or by wing. Natural hosts such as ducks in the case of influenza, do not usually get sick from the viruses they harbor, and can carry them over great distances. H5N1 has spread from China into Europe and Africa already. The question is, will we be ready? http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/sep/17/bird-flu-swine-flu-warning
  11. indigo girl

    Mandated Flu vaccine?

    I like the idea of wearing a mask to protect myself. I used to do this as an agency nurse working doing temp assignments in several nursing homes at night. I really did have fewer URI's when I put that mask on before going into rooms where I knew the patients were not covering their coughs. Of course, I was there often enough to know which patients were consistently doing this, and could take action to safeguard myself. I never caught so much as a cold that winter. While masks are a good thing, I still would go with flu vax if not allergic to it. I did not always think this way but knowing what I know now about how flu goes about killing its victims (cytokine storm) has made me change my mind over the past 5 years of studying it. Most of us have just been lucky enough to recover from influenza but not everyone will. No one can predict what influenza viruses can do, and I would not want to be responsible for infecting a vulnerable patient. You won't always know that you are infected as you can be carrying a flu virus but have no symptoms yourself, and yes, testing has shown that this does happen. So sure, wear a mask if you don't want to be vaccinated. It's inconvenient, but protects you and your patients from all kinds of respiratory infections, and of course, wash your hands frequently. https://allnurses.com/pandemic-flu-forum/study-calming-cytokine-617555.html
  12. indigo girl

    A Virus Movie Determined to Get Real

    "Contagion" is a Deeply Unsettling, Haunting - and (Mostly) Realistic - Pandemic Film This movie touches on some very real social issues regarding viral samples, and the vaccines made from them. http://www.scottmcpherson.net/journal/2011/9/12/contagion-is-a-deeply-unsettling-haunting-and-mostly-realist.html
  13. indigo girl

    Study: Calming the Cytokine Storm

    This is what Cytokine Storm can do: http://scienceblogs.com/effectmeasure/2006/10/a_cautionary_tale_about_cytoki.php The following is from an old post written in October 2006 at Effect Measure about a drug trial gone wrong. Read the full link to learn exactly what happened to these men and what that "severe inflammation" did to them.
  14. indigo girl

    Study: Calming the Cytokine Storm

    http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2011/09/study-calming-cytokine-storm.html I think that this research will turn out to be of tremendous importance. Watching the short video of the researchers themselves , I was struck by how very calmly these two scientists talk about their work. They must know how amazing this all could be, and how many lives could be saved by this completely different approach to treatment of severe influenza cases. This is really BIG. All of those people who died of multi organ failure from bird flu, all those pregnant women who died during the swine flu pandemic, I think of them and wish that this research was further along, and that they could have benefited from it. Most of them were so young, and they should not have died from influenza but they did because of cytokine storm and the cascade effect on their organs. I know that I have written before on cytokine storm and how devasting it is for the victim. I am simply blown away by the very thought of preventing this from happening. Please check out the video attached to the link. It's a very brief and elegant explanation of their work. Hats off to them, and to Scripps! Well done! (A hugh thank you to Mike at Avian Flu Diary for posting the explanations regarding this. You must have known that I would be using this, it's so very, very important!)
  15. indigo girl

    A Virus Movie Determined to Get Real

    http://healthworkscollective.com/amanda-glassman/24501/contagion-help-congress-protect-cdc-s-outbreak-investigation-budget
  16. indigo girl

    A Virus Movie Determined to Get Real

    http://blogs.wsj.com/health/2011/09/09/contagion-screening-a-busmans-holiday-for-cdc-staffers/?mod=google_news_blog The issue of funding for doing what needs to be done in the face of this kind of situation is what is hoped people will get from this film.