Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - page 6

Am I the only one who becomes at least mildly irritated whenever a random individual finds out that someone is a nurse and proceeds to say, "You're rolling in the big bucks!" To keep things... Read More

  1. Visit  eroc profile page
    2
    Great point...mine was just over 10K...
    Quote from nisteber
    We get an extra 20 an hour at my place of work when they have a high census. 43$/hour, not bad for a community college degree. Also if you have 50k in student loans, that is poor planning on your part. Nobody forced you to go to a university, a community college ADN, and an ADN to BSN program would have cost much less than 50 Gs.
    tnmarie and nisteber like this.
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  3. Visit  Dassit82 profile page
    6
    I currently work in Accounting (enrolling in an Accelerated BSN program) and it's a God awful, boring, job that makes not one damn of a difference by the end of the day. I feel like a bump on a log in this world. I can't help but be a little disappointed in all of the complaining in this thread. I agree, I highly doubt any amount of money is good enough for the work nurses do - at least the good ones, but isn't that why we are here? Sure, we need to get paid to feed ourselves and families, but isn't the work you do important enough to not have to complain about it? Also, $50k goes a hell of a longer way than does some of these poor mothers I currently work with who only make about $29 and somehow support their families. No, their husbands are not bread winners - about 1/4th of their husbands are laid off and we live in NJ, which is not a low cost of living. Taxes will soon be going up due to the destruction Hurricane Sandy brought about, too. I feel for everyone who has to struggle to make ends meet. I feel for all of you current nurses who are busting your behinds because there really is no adequate price for the amount of work you put into your day, but just remember - you're making more of a difference in this world than 99% of today's workers.
    ICUman, ms.lovely, LadyFree28, and 3 others like this.
  4. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    2
    Quote from nisteber
    We get an extra 20 an hour at my place of work when they have a high census. 43$/hour, not bad for a community college degree. Also if you have 50k in student loans, that is poor planning on your part. Nobody forced you to go to a university, a community college ADN, and an ADN to BSN program would have cost much less than 50 Gs.
    I am the first one to say that post-secondary schools are all about the money, but to your reply, well, I say wow.

    If you have noticed, however, most places now require or are pushing for BSN baseline for hiring. Far be it for me to tell people what to do, but people can also save money taking a number of general ed. courses and such at the community college and then transfering into a BSN program. I think in the future this should be the role of community colleges for nurses. Help get them started and prepare for transfer. Say whatever you want, but having solely a community college degree it generally frowned upon any more, and in some ways, that is a shame, b/c select community college nursing programs for RN have some great teachers and really good programs. My original school's graduates from ADN beat out GNs from ivy league universities on state board exams. Of course the program has had quite a few ups and downs since then. Overall, nursing will never be respected as a profession (whether you feel it is or not) without at least maintaining that baseline education involves a bachelor's of science in nursing. No other profession does what is done for RNs in this regard. You go into psychology, you need a baseline in the field and then you had better matriculate quickly into a graduate program if you want to work. You can't do OT, PT,teaching, and the like w/o a baseline bachelor's in the area. I'd say everything pretty much I took in bachelor's nursing science program was helpful and important. The things was, however, I went to a private university, and that's what stings in terms of cost. I did it strategically, however, b/c of current/future plans. I would not, however, say that everyone should take out all these loans for private universities for BSN. Go to a public university or see about as many scholarships as you can. In general, it is completely true that the cost of post-secondary education and graduate education is outlandish, period, end of story. Lots of students matriculated into four-year programs, however, take a good number of courses, such as general education, at the community college, and then transfer them back into their four-year programs.

    I just wish all these schools would put a freeze on tuition hikes, b/c they never cease to go up. This hurts nursing as a profession, b/c these folks will do the ADN to save money--some of them will continue on and get the full undergrad degree and up and a good number of them won't. But as long as people can get the ADN and take the RN boards and work, a good percentage will have little impetus to meet baseline educational requires, b/c, well, they have not been mandated as baseline. It is getting harder to get a position or to make vertical moves in the field w/o at least a BSN. This "requirement" has taken forever to implement, and it's nothing official.

    I will say that my private school added value to my approach and actual practice of nursing.
    LadyFree28 and Sehille4774 like this.
  5. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    4
    I think it's pretty clear that the old adage of more higher education equaling more compensation is becoming less and less true in this economy. How many people with majors in liberal arts are waiting tables? Even a MBA is becoming next to useless.

    The only higher education I see as serving any PRACTICAL purpose is that which enables it's grads to sit for licensure examinations that result in ACTUAL real world credentials, like nursing, medicine, law. Vocational stuff like HVAC, plumbers, etc. You know jobs we actually need. We need more underemployed grad students like we need a hole in the head. It's the resultant LICENSURE that's important. The education entitiling said licensure is secondary. It's simply means to an end.


    And that is why a LPN with a year of vocational school deserves to make more than the guy with a masters in fine arts working the front desk at the museum.
    Last edit by BrandonLPN on Nov 27, '12
  6. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    0
    Quote from Dassit82
    I currently work in Accounting (enrolling in an Accelerated BSN program) and it's a God awful, boring, job that makes not one damn of a difference by the end of the day. I feel like a bump on a log in this world. I can't help but be a little disappointed in all of the complaining in this thread. I agree, I highly doubt any amount of money is good enough for the work nurses do - at least the good ones, but isn't that why we are here? Sure, we need to get paid to feed ourselves and families, but isn't the work you do important enough to not have to complain about it? Also, $50k goes a hell of a longer way than does some of these poor mothers I currently work with who only make about $29 and somehow support their families. No, their husbands are not bread winners - about 1/4th of their husbands are laid off and we live in NJ, which is not a low cost of living. Taxes will soon be going up due to the destruction Hurricane Sandy brought about, too. I feel for everyone who has to struggle to make ends meet. I feel for all of you current nurses who are busting your behinds because there really is no adequate price for the amount of work you put into your day, but just remember - you're making more of a difference in this world than 99% of today's workers.

    I say really research the field and shadow a lot before you make the move. In all reality, you can make more money but meeting whatever requirements you need to move into a controller role. You will also have a better lifestyle in terms of shift-work, holidays, weekends, etc.

    I mean only you know what you think you would like to do for a living, but really research it first, and try to pick up some part-time work as a tech or nurse's aid in a busy hospital. Just like with medicine, any glitz and glory wears off, and it is a profession that can be miserable unless you really love it. Even if you do love it and are good in it, it can have many periods of misery, d/t a number of factors, which I too involved and numerous to go into here. Also,consider that nurses will continue to have a hard time getting positions over the next several years.

    Every controller I know makes well over six figures. You aren't going to see that in nursing unless you work a lot of overtime, work a lot of travel/agency (after you get a fair amount of experience), go back to school for CRNA, or get a masters and up and go into administration. Shoot, many masters prepared nurse educators do not make six figures. Of course there is also pharm sales, but that is iffy. Some NPs make in the 90's, while many make only about 70's to 80's.

    It's a demanding field that constantly interfaces with people of varying needs and disciplines--the needs/demands are almost always there and are pressing. Administration is a problem in nursing as well, but that's another story.

    Research, get some experience in a hospital setting or other relevant settings, and think long and hard about your choice.

    I am not trying to discourage you at all. Be aware of all the pluses and minuses, and your own heart and motivation. There are just so many miserable nurses who didn't do this, and IMHO, it has hurt and hurts the whole field.

    OTOH, if you really have a caring, assertive, advocate/servant's heart, and are bright and inquisitive, and if you are willing to put up with an awful lot, go for it.

    Good luck with whatever you decide.
    Last edit by samadams8 on Nov 27, '12
  7. Visit  ThePrincessBride profile page
    5
    "Big bucks" is subjective. Also, Nursing is one of the few professional fields that only requires a two-year degree. A two-year degree earning over 50k/yr starting is quite impressive. The other professions listed require a bachelor's/higher education.

    That said, I do look forward to have 250% increase in my salary once I am finished with Nursing school, and there is no shame in admitting that. Nursing is a great field where one can work part-time and still make VERY good money. It is a solid middle class lifestyle, something I desire. I'm not looking to become a millionaire, just a stable, comfortable lifestyle.
    QuarterLife88, tnmarie, cp1024, and 2 others like this.
  8. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    I think it's pretty clear that the old adage of more higher education equaling more compensation is becoming less and less true in this economy. How many people with majors in liberal arts are waiting tables? Even a MBA is becoming next to useless.

    The only higher education I see as serving any PRACTICAL purpose is that which enables it's grads to sit for licensure examinations that result in ACTUAL real world credentials, like nursing, medicine, law. Vocational stuff like HVAC, plumbers, etc. You know jobs we actually need. We need more underemployed grad students like we need a hole in the head. It's the resultant LICENSURE that's important. The education entitiling said licensure is secondary. It's simply means to an end.
    But it is becoming more of the requirement for a getting a position, especially one that is more robust in terms of work and opportunities.

    To me, a big part of the problem is the outrageous expense of higher education. Sadly I don't see much that will change this coming up in the future; so people have to do their own benefits:cost analyses on whether it is worth it or even doable for them. The market has tightened for a number of reasons, but the opportunity to limit non-BSN and graduate-prepared RNs for job positions is the trend with employers.

    An MBA from a solid school is valuable, but as is in many situations, you may have to be willing to move and pay your dues like many other folks.

    BTW, at this point, I think with the powers that be, pushing for a baseline requirement of BSN in order to sit to take the boards may well become the reality. When? Who is to say? The issue is currently being addressed by way of current market trends and such. But it could easily move beyond that soon enough.
  9. Visit  ThePrincessBride profile page
    4
    Quote from Jean Marie46514
    also, slightly off topic, but, when we began getting a higher % of male nurses, i naively sorta kinda thought, "YESssss, now we will be paid more!!"
    but, it didn't make much difference in our pay scales at all, much to my surprise.
    and males never became a HUGE % of the nurses, like i'd hoped, either.

    darn.
    Nope. You would just have the male nurses making more money for doing the same job with the same amount of experience as their female counterparts. THAT is what would/will most likely happen.
  10. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    9
    I'm probably not in an objective position to judge what equals "big bucks" compared to most here. I have no kids and own my own house and make a little over 50k. I know I am in a position to have WAY more disposable income than most here.

    With that said, I never cease to be
    shocked by people who clearly live beyond their means and then complain about how hard they're "struggling". Barring medical issues or other unforeseen acts of God, I see no reason why a family with 3-4 kids making 50k a year would "struggle". No family "needs" two cars or a big house in the suburbs or name brand anything. That's not struggling, that's just called not having all the crap you want. Think about the fast food working single mother family in Detroit. Now THATS struggling. I think 50k a year for a family is more than sufficient for a perfectly comfortable lifestyle. Our society's definition of struggle shows we really don't understand that word.

    Of course, all this is neither here nor there regarding whether or not nurses are compensated fairly compared to other professions. Remember, though, compensation isn't related to how *hard* or a job is. Or I would have made more moving furniture. It's all about supply and demand.
    Last edit by BrandonLPN on Nov 27, '12
    ShaeMarie, GM2RN, tnmarie, and 6 others like this.
  11. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    2
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    I have no kids and own my own house. I know I am in a position to have WAY more disposable income than most here.
    Same here. I'm a single homeowner with no children.
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    With that said, I never cease to be shocked by people who clearly live beyond their means and then complain about how hard they're "struggling". Barring medical issues or other unforeseen acts of God, I see no reason why a family with 3-4 kids making 50k a year would "struggle". No family "needs" two cars or a big house in the suburbs or name brand anything. That's not struggling, that's just called not having all the crap you want.
    My example of 'Carla' in the article shows how a single person with a $50k income can live from hand to mouth. 'Carla' drove a used car that was paid off, rented a tiny house, and had no luxuries or expensive shopping habits, yet her staggering weekly after-school childcare bill for three children under the age of ten was enough to make the house of cards shatter.

    High-quality childcare is staggeringly expensive for single moms who do not have family members who can watch the kids for free. Also, it costs serious money to properly feed a family of four, unless you plan to live off generic macaroni dinners and starchy top ramen noodles.
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Think about the fast food working single mother family in Detroit. Now THATS struggling.
    The single mom who works a minimum wage fast food job in Detroit has an income so low that she qualifies for housing assistance, a food stamp card, Medicaid for the kids, WIC vouchers for any children under the age of five, and childcare assistance. Through EITC, she might also qualify for a hefty tax refund every April.
    tnmarie and cp1024 like this.
  12. Visit  CT Pixie profile page
    7
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    . Barring medical issues or other unforeseen acts of God, I see no reason why a family with 3-4 kids making 50k a year would "struggle". I think 50k a year for a family is more than sufficient for a perfectly comfortable lifestyle.
    Really? You think $50K is suficient for a family of 4 kids w/mom and dad for a total of 6?? Can YOU live on $8,333.33 per year?? Because that's what it would come out to per person.

    I know I live in a very high cost of living state (CT) but I can't see that $50K for a family of 6 in any state being sufficient.
    ICUman, gummi bear, tnmarie, and 4 others like this.
  13. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    3
    Ok, I probably shouldn't have said that, as I have no experience raising children. Point taken. Also, where I live 50k goes a long way as living is super cheap here. I know my dad raised us (4 kids) well here on 40k a year so that's what I was basing it on. Of course that was 10 years ago, so apples and oranges.


    I apologize if I offended.
    tnmarie, DTW90, and somenurse like this.
  14. Visit  CT Pixie profile page
    0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Ok, I probably shouldn't have said that, as I have no experience raising children. Point taken. Also, where I live 50k goes a long way as living is super cheap here. I apologize if I offended.
    You didn't offend me Brandon I was just thinking..wow...I'd love to see a person live comfortably on a bit more than $8K a year.


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