Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - page 34

Am I the only one who becomes at least mildly irritated whenever a random individual finds out that someone is a nurse and proceeds to say, "You're rolling in the big bucks!" To keep things... Read More

  1. Visit  babaloo8 profile page
    1
    Great topic. As an RN, I hear this all the time. Nurses have worked hard historically to be respected as a profession, not a trade and along with that, our level of pay should be commensurate with that distinction .
    I think also, healthcare organizations have encouraged this perception by using the 'high' wage of a nurse to justify their financial woes or there need to cut back staff.
    As a seasoned nurse labor rep once said: " We make good money, BUT we still make less per hour than a plumber AND we can kill you!"
    GM2RN likes this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  joe007 profile page
    4
    I made more money in the military as an enlisted person than I do now as a nurse without weekends etc. Nursing is not what people think it is.
    Fiona59, smmctowelie69, PMFB-RN, and 1 other like this.
  4. Visit  caliotter3 profile page
    0
    Quote from joe007
    I made more money in the military as an enlisted person than I do now as a nurse without weekends etc. Nursing is not what people think it is.
    Likewise. We were taught in school that one component of consideration for being called a profession is the rate of compensation for one's work. Nursing is sorely lacking in this respect.
  5. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    1
    Quote from caliotter3
    We were taught in school that one component of consideration for being called a profession is the rate of compensation for one's work. Nursing is sorely lacking in this respect.
    Admittedly, I've seen anecdotal evidence of wage stagnation and deflation in nursing.

    Lean times of austerity are in the future of our profession, especially with an oversupply of new entrants who place downward pressure on wages.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  6. Visit  ICUman profile page
    1
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Admittedly, I've seen anecdotal evidence of wage stagnation and deflation in nursing.

    Lean times of austerity are in the future of our profession, especially with an oversupply of new entrants who place downward pressure on wages.
    So how do we halt or reverse this?

    Many people seem to run to grad school for better opportunity but it is quickly falling into the same situation
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  7. Visit  Libby1987 profile page
    1
    Quote from ICUman
    So how do we halt or reverse this?

    Many people seem to run to grad school for better opportunity but it is quickly falling into the same situation
    I'm hopeless about it. Our nurse population does not want to make it more difficult to obtain a degree or licensing, a majority still thinks a 2 year degree is enough and the rest is fluff. And then there is the whole foreign nurse recruitment ploy if we did.

    It still chaps me that PT's had to have at least a bachelors back in the 80's when I went to school and their numbers remain in their favor with no recruitment goimg on behind their backs.

    But we wanted to hang on to a quick education to a good job. Flame me but I think we've had too many individuals protecting themselves instead of looking to the larger outcome in general.
    ICUman likes this.
  8. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    1
    The glut of nurses has nothing to do with the fact there are ADNs.
    That you think so is a sign you have fallen for the false propaganda.
    The glut was deliberately created specifically to reduce nurses's compensation and power. The tool used was the false "NURSING SHORTAGE!!!" propaganda.
    TheCommuter likes this.
  9. Visit  Libby1987 profile page
    0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    The glut of nurses has nothing to do with the fact there are ADNs.
    That you think so is a sign you have fallen for the false propaganda.
    The glut was deliberately created specifically to reduce nurses's compensation and power. The tool used was the false "NURSING SHORTAGE!!!" propaganda.
    Well first our would be RN's of the world don't do any real research and then the 2 yr programs produce high numbers in short order.

    But when we can't trust the judgement of would be nurses to listen to us shouting that the market is flooded (good gawd look in the US forums) we don't even try to slow down their production.

    So since the PT model isn't worth mention, what do you think is the solution?
  10. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    2
    Well first our would be RN's of the world don't do any real research and then the 2 yr programs produce high numbers in short order.
    The only two year programs I am aware of are the direct entry MSN programs that are popping up all over the place. In 2005 there were none in my state, now there are 4. In addition we now have many ONE year RN programs. There is a HUGE one year, online RN program in my state. All classes are online and clinicals are done near the student's home. They eve have students in this program in other states. Literaly a person street with zero healthcare experience can get into one of these programs and be an RN 12 months later.
    These programs are churning out new grads like never before.
    The ADN programs I know of take longer than 2 years since they usually make students comeplete re-reqs before they can get admitted to the 2 year RN program. 3 years seems pretty typical and 4 not unusual.

    But when we can't trust the judgement of would be nurses to listen to us shouting that the market is flooded (good gawd look in the US forums) we don't even try to slow down their production.

    So since the PT model isn't worth mention, what do you think is the solution?
    The PT model would never be acceptable to those in nursing leadership like the ANA and AACN. I wouldn't have a problem with nursing following the PT model but that isn't going to happen. Had the ANA and other advocasy groups followed the PT model I am sure there would have been very little opposition to it.
    Personaly I believe that one of the greatest strengths that nursing has, that other health professions don't have, is diversity. I think it's great that so many people come to nursing from a wide variety of backgrounds. The community college system is how many of these diverse people enter nursing. I would hate to see nursing become like medicine or pharmacy, made up mostly of people who went strait high school -> University undergrad -> university graduate school -> practice. I think we would be much the worse for excluding the former house wives, cops, teachers, farmers, factory workers, enlisted veterans, CNAs, and thousands of other backgrounds from entering nursing.
    It makes me angry that my tax dollars are being used to wreck my profession. First thing that needs to stop is state and federal funding for new and expanding nursing programs. Our own organizations are helping do it to us. The ANA only advocates for things that are BAD for nurses as far as I can see.
    ICUman and Libby1987 like this.
  11. Visit  Libby1987 profile page
    0
    I have to admit ignorance to the new types of RN programs, I really had no idea that there were 1 yr programs, or that some have really lax but $$$ admission requirements. It wasn't like that in the area I went to school with only 1 BSN and 1 ASN college in the area.
  12. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from Libby1987
    I have to admit ignorance to the new types of RN programs, I really had no idea that there were 1 yr programs, or that some have really lax but $$$ admission requirements. It wasn't like that in the area I went to school with only 1 BSN and 1 ASN college in the area.

    I didn't say the admission standards were lax. Some are, like a private, for profit program that has been operating in a neighboring state for a few years now. However the 12 month accelerated BSN programs in my state are run through state university's and have fairly high admission standards. Even so they turn away qualified students every semester for lack of space in these programs. Last time I talked to one of their clinical instructors (2014) they were graduating three classes a year.
    The direct entry masters programs are very expensive since they get to charge graduate tuition for the same education (basic entry level RN) that community college provide for less than $10K total. They also have fairly high admission standards. The students I meet from those programs have mostly been very bright and ambitious.
    One thing I have noticed. In my job as full time rapid response I have a student with me (usually) 2 out of 3 shifts from a variety of programs from ADN, to traditional BSN, to accelerated BSN. The direct entry MSN students have the option of doing their preceptorship with rapid response but they never do. ADN and BSN students are fighting to get a preceptorship with rapid and we usually get the best and brightest students. However, so far not a single direct entry MSN has been willing to come to night shift and do their preceptorship with rapid, choosing instead to do them in out patient clinics and rehab.
    All of these students do clinicals in my hospital and get to know the rapid RNs during clinicals. Most of them get to see what we do and are willing to make just about any arrangements in their personal life in order to come to nights with a rapid RN. Apparently the competition among ADN and BSN students to precept with rapid is intense among them and absent among the direct entry MSN students.
    I have always wondered why this is.
    To my great annoyance all of these programs have been started, and expanded with tax money extorted from the state and federal governments. Large health systems and (supposedly) nurse advocacy organizations (ANA for example) for this money. They use the false "NURSING SHORTAGE!" propaganda and fear tactics by predicting how awful things will be in health care if we don't train up a vast number of new nurses.

    PS to correct my previous post there are not 4 direct entry MSN programs (DMSN) in my state. There are only two. However there is also two DMSN programs in the neighboring state and we get their students for clinicals.
    Last edit by PMFB-RN on Apr 15
  13. Visit  NicuGal profile page
    0
    Great article! It just runs me wrong when people say I must make lots and lots of money. I make a good wage, but not near what any of us deserve! And according to the government I should be able to foot all
    but 5000$ of my kids college expenses lol lol

    if I had no payments of any sort, sure I would feel rich, but this is real life.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top