DNR Tattoo

  1. 0 Hi, I have loved reading all the tattoo stories. I don't have one, but have always wanted one, maybe someday.

    I posted this under that thread but thought more of you would see it if I posted it as a separate topic. This article is of an 80-year-old woman who has DNR tattooed on her chest. The tattoo is recent, not from years ago.

    I admire her for letting her wishes be known in such a permanent way, but a friend of mine says she thinks that nurses and doctors still cannot abide by her wishes if any family members do not agree with her DNR request. Is this true?

    Here is the article and picture (I could not copy and paste the whole article here).

    http://www.boingboing.net/2006/05/17...scitate_t.html

    Enjoy,

    Robin
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  3. Visit  robpritc profile page

    About robpritc

    Joined Mar '07; Posts: 30; Likes: 2.

    10 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  caliotter3 profile page
    0
    This topic just came up in a discussion with a paramedic. He stated that in this state, when the EMTs are called to a case, they can not go by the directions of a tattoo or a bracelet or necklace alone when it comes to DNR. They have to be presented with the paper document declaring DNR to follow and take with them during the transport, otherwise they are required to make all attempts to save the pt, by law.
  5. Visit  zooz profile page
    0
    Quote from caliotter3
    This topic just came up in a discussion with a paramedic. He stated that in this state, when the EMTs are called to a case, they can not go by the directions of a tattoo or a bracelet or necklace alone when it comes to DNR. They have to be presented with the paper document declaring DNR to follow and take with them during the transport, otherwise they are required to make all attempts to save the pt, by law.
    I'm pretty sure it's the same way in my state as well.
  6. Visit  RNsRWe profile page
    0
    In NY, no one is going to look at a tattoo that says "DNR" and take that as a legal directive. After all, do three initials in a tattoo mean what you think it does? To play Devil's Advocate, imagine the shocked family of the now dead woman saying "DNR?? Those were her dead husband's initials!!"

    Anyway, even if everyone present agrees that the tattoo means 'Do Not Resuscitate', it's not been signed by a physician and isn't legally binding.

    She's gonna get brought 'round again.

    I must be tired, because I'm now envisioning the tattoo artist handing the needle/pen thingy to a doctor and saying, "write your name after the X"!!!
  7. Visit  mandirocker profile page
    0
    I have joked that that is a tattoo that i would want......to me, agreed that isn't legally binding, but it sounds like she wants to take charge of her health care. But i think I'd find a medical power of attorney that would uphold what my wishes were. :spin:
  8. Visit  Flare profile page
    0
    I suppose it wouldn't be legally binding - it would need the order to back it up.

    By the way - i love the fact that that lady in the article got a senior citizen discount on the tattoo
  9. Visit  notaclue profile page
    0
    Good for her!
  10. Visit  End Game RN profile page
    0
    So cool!!!!!!!!!!!
    agree with some of the posts that this would not be considered legal, binding or whatever, better to complete the paperwork before hand and put several copies in the hands of family and/or a friend who is like family.

    DNR...Hmmmm...Duncan Nicholas Robertson..Hmmm... yeah I can see how this could be taken as initials of the woman's husband.

    To funny..love it!!!!!!!!!!!

    Eeka EndGame RN
  11. Visit  Simba&NalasMom profile page
    0
    Has anybody seen the show "Whose Death is it Anyway?" I think it's an HBO original. We watched it in school and it was really interesting. There was a nurse who had her DNR tattooed on her belly and it said "No Core" rather than "DNR." I think it had a few more words that gave more specific instructions as well. Not sure if that one is any more enforceable than the one the older lady had on her chest, though...
  12. Visit  angel_nurse_83 profile page
    0
    "but a friend of mine says she thinks that nurses and doctors still cannot abide by her wishes if any family members do not agree with her DNR request"
    If the pt. is competent of making her own decision ... (evaluated by health care professionals upon admission) it is her choice that will be followed and it will not be overridden by family members who are in mourning and grieving even about the fact that she might die...

    Competant- pt makes decision about her care.
    Incompetant- Substitute decision maker, Power of attourney for care.. or if this pt. does not have any family or friends whom she appointed to be one of these roles the state will appoint someone to make this decision.
  13. Visit  elkpark profile page
    0
    Quote from angel_nurse_83
    "but a friend of mine says she thinks that nurses and doctors still cannot abide by her wishes if any family members do not agree with her DNR request"
    If the pt. is competent of making her own decision ... (evaluated by health care professionals upon admission) it is her choice that will be followed and it will not be overridden by family members who are in mourning and grieving even about the fact that she might die...

    Competant- pt makes decision about her care.
    Incompetant- Substitute decision maker, Power of attourney for care.. or if this pt. does not have any family or friends whom she appointed to be one of these roles the state will appoint someone to make this decision.
    It would be nice if it were that simple, but you can't depend on your wishes being followed, even if you've taken all the correct, legal steps, if your family members at the bedside want you kept alive. I have literally seen it happen. Hospital attorneys will be glad to explain the reasoning to you -- there is a much greater risk that the hospital and doctors will get sued by the family members if the loved one is allowed to die peacefully (as s/he wished) than there is that anyone will sue for being kept alive when they didn't want to be ... So they choke and take the "safer" route. :uhoh21: The friend's (in the original quote) doctors can abide by her wishes, but there's a good chance they won't if there are family members at the bedside who disagree with her choices.

    BTW, I also joked for years about having "no code" or "do not resuscitate" tattooed across my chest, but a healthcare attorney in my state assured me, when I mentioned this in casual conversation, that the tottoo would have no legal significance in my state.


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