Communication a problem for nurses rock climbing the answer? - page 2

What I was wondering was has anyone found that miscommunication between doctor and nurse, patient and nurse or any other combination caused problems for you? If so what would you like to see done... Read More

  1. by   nicunana
    You're kidding, right?? It's the very best way I can imagine to get your whole staff to quit so you can hire who you REALLY want. Get real and address the problems instead of playing games.
  2. by   leslie :-D
    contextually, i agree w/nicunana.
    if there are problems, this course seems like an indirect, roundabout way of addressing ones' concerns.
    but that's me.
    i'm a no-nonsense person.
    much luck to you.

    leslie
  3. by   anne74
    I have a previous communications degree, and I've noticed that it's not necessarily the people at fault, it's the systems in place. If you put even the best communicator in an environment of high stress, too much work, poor computer systems (charting systems) and poorly thought-out administrative procedures you're going to get a breakdown.

    In addition, the culture of a place has a huge impact. How do the doctors treat input from nurses? Who are the decision makers in your hospital? The adminstrators who haven't been at the bedside for years, or those in the trenches? Consider developing a survey to find out what the barriers are. But make the short and to the point - and actually act on the feedback too.
  4. by   moonscar
    Thanks everyone for all the helpful advice.
    I see where you are coming from with the staff but its just not very practial to hire and rehire whenever someone won't be a team player. Your're right when you say you need a great staff, but what we are hoping to do is take a great staff that needs just a little help and provide that help through improving the communication so things go as smoothly as possible. And improve the communication through rock climbing.

    As for anne74 that was great advice I will take it into consideration what would you include on said survey?
    thanks again
    moonscar
  5. by   Jami RN
    Moonscar, it sounds like you are already an enthusiastic rock climber, or would like to be in the future. It also sounds like you have great intentions to help your staff improve their communications. There's nothing wrong with either of these things. Good for you for trying to improve working conditions on your unit.

    I think where you're going wrong with this idea is assuming that everyone who works on your unit will be equally enthusiastic about rock climbing. From the response you've gotten here (not one positive reply), I really don't think your staff is going to get the message that you'd like them to get from the rock climbing activity. I think that a few of your staff will enjoy it and "get it," but the rest will be too self-conscious, frustrated and negative to get the message. I guess you've never been in a situation where your weight, age or athletic ability has made you unable to participate well in a group situation. Let me tell you -- it feels terrible. The whole thing would be horribly humiliating to me. You sound like a good person with good intentions, and I know that you aren't setting out to humiliate and embarrass a portion of your staff, but that is what will happen if you make them go rock climbing.

    I would look for another exercise to help your staff with communication and pursue rock climbing as a hobby for yourself.

    With All Respect,
    Jami
    Last edit by Jami RN on Aug 29, '06
  6. by   santhony44
    I agree with everything Jami mentioned, above.

    There is another aspect of this no one else has mentioned, and I just thought of.

    Do your nurses make top pay for your area? Do they have everything they need to do their jobs and have enough staff?

    If not, then spending money for rock climbing, or any other expensive communications building exercise, will probably not go over well.

    The response, even if unspoken, will be this:
    "They don't have enough money to give us a raise, hire another person, give us a uniform allowance, get us a nurse on a stick that actually works, provide free parking, etc. etc. but they have enough money to do this stupid rock climbing nonsense!!"

    This has a tendency to make staff feel less appreciated, not more.

    BTDT. Can't pay for something you need but we can spend mucho money on something cosmetic that doesn't help with patient care. Tends to erode the employees' positive perceptions of their employer and loyalty to the immediate bosses and organization in general. It makes employees feel that looks are all that's important, that you want something to show that you tried to help with their problems but didn't actually go to the trouble of finding out what they need and how to help.

    Anne has an excellent suggestion. Find out what the problems really are from the people living them and what they would do to solve them. If there is not a solution to an easier problem, then explain why something can't be done.

    I think your intentions are good but this will go over like a lead balloon.
  7. by   santhony44
    If there is not a solution to an easier problem, then explain why something can't be done.

    Note to self: read it over before posting!! Try:
    If there is not a viable solution to an existing problem, then explain why nothing can be done!
  8. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Had a great seminar about making ours an "accountable" work place, and effective and clear, honest communication truly being at the center of such a concept. It was amazing, and chock full of great information, however esoteric some of it was....

    anyhow, it did not work......


    And it's not going to work UNLESS all involved are committed to it. As long as people choose passive-aggressive means of dealing with others....or outright aggressiveness....or out and out LYING to get their way......things just don't change all that much.

    I can't see how rock climbing, scuba diving or parasailing (or any such "extreme" activity) will do it. It's got to come from the top, and be clear all the way to the "bottom" for communication to be open and work.

    The climate of the workplace (esp. if toxic) has everything to do with the problem and its possible solution. Change is never easy.... people must make long-term commitments to communicate clearly and honestly. And many just can't be bothered, sadly.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Aug 29, '06
  9. by   IndyGal
    I've tried rock climbing, and my opinion is that the group needs to REALLY enjoy that type of activity going in, or everyone will have a miserable time. It scared the heck out of me, and I do other "extreme" sports. Also keep in mind that participants usually have to sign a liability waiver, even if they're only spotting -- if someone would prefer not to participate, I don't know how you could force that... or how many people would be willing to sign their life away just for management's latest team-building concept.
  10. by   tencat
    It seems to me it might behoove the powers that be to find out WHY someone is not a 'team' player or not living up to the expectations set for the team. A little meaningful appreciation goes a long way and costs less than a seminar. Just something to think about.
  11. by   flashpoint
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    Personally, I wouldn't be able to do the exercise successfully, as I'm overweight. IMHO, I already have a strike against me as people perceive overweight workers negatively. To force me to do a physical activity that would only reinforce those erroneous ideas would be unfair.

    Seems to me that if you want true teamwork, you pretty much have to find some activity that everyone can perform.

    Again, JMO.
    Not that this has anything to do with anything, and PLEASE take this as a compliment, but I always pictured you as slim and athletic and drop dead gorgeous...LOL...your posts always make me think of that person everyone is jealous of because they have a great personality and perfect looks. It's kind of nice to have someone with your personality to be overweight with me.
  12. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from cotjockey
    Not that this has anything to do with anything, and PLEASE take this as a compliment, but I always pictured you as slim and athletic and drop dead gorgeous...LOL...your posts always make me think of that person everyone is jealous of because they have a great personality and perfect looks. It's kind of nice to have someone with your personality to be overweight with me.
    Wow! That IS quite a compliment! I USED to be slim and athletic. Never gorgeous, but passable. But sadly, nowadays, I look like Mrs. Pillsbury Dougboy--without the cute hat. Which is why I refuse to wear white scrubs, but that's another thread, isn't it.

    Sorry to take the thread OT, OP, but you've really gotten a lot of sensible advice here, and I urge you to consider these thoughtful, intelligent responses. Nurses DO know how to cooperate; studies have consistently shown that it's the docs you have to get on board.
  13. by   nickola
    ;-)
    Last edit by nickola on Aug 31, '06

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