Co-workers with poor grooming habits - page 2

In the past 2 years we have had three nurses come to work at our facility that, quite frankly, look like unmade beds. It is obvious that combing their hair was not a priority before coming to work,... Read More

  1. by   nar-S
    i agree with most people here...that hygiene is of the utmost importance in our line of work...not only that, but the way your co-worker treated her patients was unacceptable...it is not just a job we have but service...we swore to an oath and that oath should not be bypassed for any reason...we treat others like we wanted to be treated...good grooming is not done only for ourselves but also as a sign of respect for others...
  2. by   EXOTIC NURSE
    PLEASE GO TO WORK CLEAN AND WELL KEMPT
  3. by   leesonlpn
    I have nursed for 21 years, so I guess I am from the old school. The days before pastels were even allowed. I am 43 yrs old. I wear white uniforms, white support(remember, I'm 43) hose, white shoes and my nursing cap with a green and gold stripe. This is who I am. If I had a dollar for every patient or visitor who commented on a nurse looking like a nurse, I could retire early. I realize what I wear is impractical in some units, but where I am, med-csu, it is quite appropriate. Our clinician wears white too, with her cap. I have worked with girls who wear white jeans and a sweatshirt, or t-shirts. Our dress code is rather ambiguous, (obviously). The program manager does have a thing about hair not being tied back. I think patients feel secure when they are being cared for by someone who is easlily recognizable as a professional. My uniforms are all under $4.00, as I buy them at a thrift store. They are in excellent condition. Attire is obviously a personal choice.From the old school to the new school. I have worked with 2-3rd year students who wear blue nail polish, chew gum, inappropriate jewellry, and lack a professional attitude.The ones we have are so lacksadaisacal.I don't like it either when the young students address their patients right away by their first name. we were always taught address by mr or mrs. unless they tell you otherwise.I know I'm anal, but I hope in a nice way!!!
    Last edit by leesonlpn on Aug 3, '01
  4. by   MollyJ
    Grooming goes when people are profoundly depressed or on drugs. I don't think supervisors should forget that.

    Some of these folks sound troubled.
  5. by   NursePooh
    Originally posted by leesonlpn
    If I had a dollar for every patient or visitor who commented on a nurse looking like a nurse, I could retire early. I realize what I wear is impractical in some units, but where I am, med-csu, it is quite appropriate. Our clinician wears white too, with her cap. I have worked with girls who wear white jeans and a sweatshirt, or t-shirts. Our dress code is rather ambiguous, (obviously). The program manager does have a thing about hair not being tied back. I think patients feel secure when they are being cared for by someone who is easlily recognizable as a professional.
    Even when I have worked units/floors where colored scrubs were the uniform, I would wear a white coat. Clean white nursing shoes also (not rainbow neon running shoes please!) with white hose. When I worked at a facility where all the floor nurses wore white, I frequently had positive feedback from patients and families. It's not practical, no, but the patients do like it.

    When my hair has been long, I always wore it tied up neatly. After having one AAOx0 patient grab me by my hair while I was leaning over the bed assessing him, I learned that particular grooming lesson the hard way!

    As for the male nurse with no underwear, EEEEEEEEEEEEW I will never complain again about women in white uniforms wearing black undies again!
  6. by   MarilynM
    In response to the grooming issue, I agree w/all except I do not like to wear whites. I may be almost the same age as the old school nurse, but havn't been nsg as long. Reminds me too much of school. LOL The 300 lb guy w/o underwear GROSS! I did work w/ a guy that never seemed to brush his teeth. I smoke and know it's bad, but always washed my hands b4 and after. R/t the perfume issue, I was taught in school it is NEVER OK to go to work wearing scents of anykind. period..... Even wear unscented deoderant...I even made my own scrubs when I actualy had time, always color-coordinate down to the socks. Work alot of SNU and I think some people enjoy seeing pretty things along w/ well-groomed nurses. Some never get flowers, so I would wear prety prints. AND ALWAYS CARRY BREATH MINTS IN MY POCKET!!!!!!!!!! I certainly would've reprted the nurse and the way she so-called administered meds...Unethical, illegal, innapropriate , and dangerous!!!!!!VIOLATION OF MOST POLICIES.
    tHANKS FOR LETTING ME RANT.
  7. by   Jenny P
    The idea of "scents of any kind" reminds me of when I was in labor with my first kid: I told the nurse who was coaching me to get out of my face because her breath smelt so strong of garlic that I was getting sick from it! My husband has never let me forget that; and if I'm working, I don't eat either garlic or onions because of that incident.
    Regarding the white uniform and cap: I was going bald from wearing my cap before I finally gave it up (many years ago). I have fine, thin, straight hair and had to put it in a pincurl on top before I put my cap on to keep it on. Anytime I ran into a curtain, I'd bump the dang thing and lose a few hairs. Whites don't work so well where I work (CV-ICU) either, so I wear turtlenecks and scrub jackets and pants that are neat and clean. I do wear white leather running shoes (and I can't run!!! ), but I also wear weird and wild socks which no one sees anyway because my scrub pants are long enough to cover them up unless I cross my legs- and I usually don't. We have some people who dress in tee shirts or sweat shirts at times, but as long as they are clean, no one seems to say anything about it. One co-worker was embarrassed recently, when she wore a tee shirt with a beer logo on it under her nursing sweatshirt and the air conditioning was off for part of the night. I think she learned a lesson there, because she ended up wearing an isolation gown over it all night.
  8. by   yellow rose
    I am a nursing student at a very traditional school. We are required to wear caps to clinical, which nobody likes, and students from other schools make fun of. However, I have recieved comments from pts- mostly elderly- about how nice it is to see a "nurse that looks like a nurse."
    Caps can get in the way though- one of my friends was changing an incontinent brief, and her cap fell into the soiled one. Nasty!!
  9. by   willie2001
    I read someone's post about garlic breath. We have one doc who most always reeks of garlic. Some days you can smell him coming 20 feet away. He is well groomed and neat in every other respect.
  10. by   ERDIVA2B
    Yup I think we've all worked with a few smellies ! I personally don't like caps. Only to wear to candlelighting! I asked why they stopped wearing them once & my Prof. said it transmits a lot of nosocomial infections. Think about it, you change scrubs daily but you dont wash or change your cap daily! Eew gross! i know its kept clean but its a moving vector! I understand it looks very nurse like and all.
    I personally have every scrub color and print known to man. I love buying new scrubs! I don't even walk into my bedroom with them dirty, straight to the laundry basket. My work Birki's stay in the garage too! Call me paranoid!
    We are the health care advocates so we should all look the part! Not like were hungover from last nites party!
  11. by   kielydebra
    Hi duckie, I agree with you, nurses as professionals should take pride in their appearance, personal hygene is very important, especially because of the spread of infection and also because of taking infection out of the hospital or residential home and into the community. We don't want nurses to look like something of of vogue magazine where they have got so much makeup that they look like painted dolls, but you are right. If you don't take care and pride in yourself than how can you care for others. Also, the point you made about the new hire was right, if she couldn't make an effort for an interview then she definately wont make an effort with the job. I have worked and been treated ( only a couple of times) by nurses who have stank of BO. You was right to say what you felt, you was asked your opinion and you gave it as honestly as you could, you followed your instincts. So cheer up
  12. by   preddish
    For all of you that remember Glamour Magazine Do's and Dont's...........perhaps theyt still have them.


    I have been teased about my standards for nurses and their appearnace on an interviewand at work. It says a great deal. In my owqn perzsonal experience I have found that nurses who do not address their appearance tend to be poor performers. I and my department have been spared a nurse who diverted controlled substances, married a transvestite patient, brought her suddendly dead cat and left in my office, etc. I knew none of these details but I did not approve of their dress when they came to my department to interview with the Nurse Managers. I nixed their hires. As dated as both of my references may be, "Dress For Success" is still a standard we need to adhere to.
  13. by   Bozo180
    As an Army Nurse, I work in an organisation that prides itself on its standard of dress. Indeed, any violation from this standard is dealt with harshly. Over the years, this has become a way of life for myself and my fellow workers.

    Over the Christmas period just gone I worked in the ICU and A&E of the local teriary hospital in order to gain some more "hand-on" prior to going on deployment. Whilst I found this work both enjoyable and rewarding, I also found it incredibly frustrating. A big factor in this frustration was the lack of self discipline exhibited by the regular staff as evidenced by their standard of dress.

    It was not uncommon for staff to rock up to work with ripped clothing, wearing t-***** advertising alcohol and tobacco products, messy hair and literally arriving straight from being out partying all night. Whilst they did not look the part, I must add that their clinical skills were always above board.

    I believe that a big part of our job is to gain the trust of the clients and their family. In this case, first impressions count for a lot. It takes 5 minutes out of your day to run an iron over your clothes and brush your hair. That 5 minutes will save you 30 minutes in proving your skills to a sceptical client &/or family.

    Anyway, that's just my opinion.....

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Co-workers with poor grooming habits