Co-worker hitting up the Dr.s for meds during shift? - page 5

The other day, a new nurse in our dept. (well-baby nursery) came to work sick (elevated temp and sore throat). The charge nurse wouldn't tell her to go home (didn't want to hurt her feelings... Read More

  1. by   ladyinred667
    Quote from MultipurposeRN
    T
    It does burn me that nurses are not allowed the same privileges of being ill like the nonmedical person is.
    Believe it or not, when I used to wait tables we had the same problems calling out sick. Charming, isn't it?
  2. by   PedsER-RN
    i've asked docs i work with for a script before, but then again i work in an er and know them pretty well. i got sick at work one night and the doc offered me a phenergan rx. i certainly wouldn't ask a doc i don't know well.

    the cn should have sent the sick nurse home, esp. if she worked in a nursery. that's wrong to knowingly expose babies to a sick person.
  3. by   weezer123
    I would think the doctors are putting theirselves in jeprody ,,, what if someone had a bad reaction or died from their "being Kind"....Perscription!!!
  4. by   abby40
    The Doctor I work for (Family Practice) just tell's the nurse to make an appt., with him and he will be glad to treat them. Most of them do, we have several from the Hospital that are regular patients.
  5. by   clee1
    The Docs I work for, (an Urgent Care clinic) are glad to help out one of the staff.... but, we ALWAYS fill out an encounter chart for ourselves, just as though we were one of the "regular" patients.

    Keeps everything on the up-and-up that way.
  6. by   27YearRN
    The other side of the coin...

    As an advanced practice nurse I am held to a standard that any rx that I write has been preceeded by a history, physical exam, and treatment plan that is documented.
    The last thing I need is for a pharmacist to report me to the medical board if one of my nurse friends accidently mentions that I wrote a rx for her UTI or sinus or whatever.
    If it hadn't happened in our community to several docs, nurses and PA's I probably wouldn't mention it.
    So don't be offended if some docs or NP's decline to give you a rx.
    The company I work for also has clear guidelines that say "no exam, no documentation, no script".
  7. by   traumagirll99
    I think the bottom issue here is that there are some nurses who will take advantage of the situation. I used to work in the ER with a nurse who was going through a difficult divorce. She would come in to work and we would all get a blow by blow of what was going on in her ending marriage. Well we also had a very sweet and helpful ER doctor who felt so bad for this nurse that when she told him that she couldn't sleep, eat, or function because of the stress he very nicely wrote her a script for Ativan and also for Ambien to help her. well when this nurse overdosed on her ativan and ambien 3 weeks later this very nice doctor had a lot of explaining to do. She was later terminated and a policy came out that if we asked an ER doctor for a script on the side that we would also be terminated.
  8. by   rn/writer
    Quote from traumagirll99
    I think the bottom issue here is that there are some nurses who will take advantage of the situation. I used to work in the ER with a nurse who was going through a difficult divorce. She would come in to work and we would all get a blow by blow of what was going on in her ending marriage. Well we also had a very sweet and helpful ER doctor who felt so bad for this nurse that when she told him that she couldn't sleep, eat, or function because of the stress he very nicely wrote her a script for Ativan and also for Ambien to help her. well when this nurse overdosed on her ativan and ambien 3 weeks later this very nice doctor had a lot of explaining to do. She was later terminated and a policy came out that if we asked an ER doctor for a script on the side that we would also be terminated.
    She's very fortunate that she lost only her job and not her life. The doc is too.
  9. by   elizabeth321
    In my opinion it is inappropriate and crossing boundries.
    I work in the ER as well...if we have an issue we get a chart made up and then our doctor will advise and prescribe.
    Liz
  10. by   Bethy-lynn
    There is a time and a place for this ( so to speak). My husband (an ob-gyn) has been asked many times to refill birth -control pills for people , but he won't because that is a type of pill that really needs to be regulated by someone familiar with your body. He also is extremely annoyed when new employees ask him for prescriptions, and he barely can even remember their names. But, for nurses that he has worked with for a while, it's not an issue for him to write for simple things, like abx, allergy meds, or pyridium for an oncoming uti. I think that in the end, it really depends on what's being asked for, and who's asking.
  11. by   wellnessNP
    Writing a Rx for a co-worker is not a big deal when it is for antibiotics or something of the such. Most docs will let you know if they do not want to do it. Things that are taboo are pain meds (especially vicodin), anxiolytics, or meds that are out of the docs realm in general. Making these professional courtesies a "firing offense" only keeps nurses down just that much more. Doctors will ask their colleagues for favors in a heartbeat.
  12. by   bethin
    There is a sign posted at work that we not ask the doctors to write scripts or discuss our medical problems with them.

    It's not followed. Our doctors are very nice and if they see a nurse suffering they will come up and ask if they can write anything for us. I like knowing that if I'm suffering on Sat I don't need to wait until Mon to get a script for antibiotic.
  13. by   twotrees2
    Quote from rach_nc_03
    I've been offered an rx before when i got really sick at work with what turned out to be a nasty sinus infection. when i left for work that morning, i thought I was just really tired, but it got worse throughout the day and i ended up needing to go home. One of the neurologists with whom I had a good rapport (which was unusual, as I was still a CNA, and most docs treated me like I was invisible) offered to write for some abx. I felt so crappy that I couldn't imagine going to the pharmacy on the way home, so I thanked him and declined the offer.

    like another poster said, what really bothers me is when people show up to work sick. I just started working in a corporate job as a nurse consultant, and this company has a very strict policy about going in to work sick. You have an extended illness bank that kicks in after your 2nd day out so you don't use up all your PTO. I find it so ironic that this place where people just sit in cubicles all day is more concerned about sick employees spreading infection than the hospitals where I've worked.

    I know it's a very different set of circumstances- you can't really work as a bedside nurse from home with your laptop- but it makes me so angry that hospitals staff so poorly that employees are guilted into working when they absolutely should NOT be around patients. Of course, you also see the people (not just nurses, but all sorts) who think they're being a martyr by showing up sick. :uhoh21: Come on, people! You're putting EVERYONE at risk, and it just irks the snot out of me.
    i have gone to work sick by choice cause i know they will not replace me and that will only make the workload heavier for the rest ( or half replace me - get someone to come for a few hours - however i do not feel i put my residents at risk ( for one thing usually any viral or bacterial infection will be infectious days before the fever actually breaks out and you feel sick - i wear a mask and gown as well as wash wash wash and wear gloves between washing - i may look like I'm from outer space wearing it all shift but reverse precautions work well if utilized. not being a martyr - just doing my share of the job

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