Clogs while nursing - page 6

Hello everyone, This thread is inspired by the one "JCAHO and Clogs". This is something I've noticed alot lately-people in the medical field wearing crocs. I understand that they are wonderfully... Read More

  1. by   casualjim
    Zappos.com
    Free shipping no tax. 3 day turnaround.
    good deal
  2. by   allele
    I was also going to suggest Zappos....when I tried the crocs site I'd either have trouble finding the size I wanted in the style I wanted, or I couldn't get the color I wanted! Zappos gave me a better selection (a bit of a surprise!), especially since I didn't want the holes on top (the ones with the holes are all I can find in the stores around here), and it's EASY to send the shoes back! Just get a shipping label, box 'em up and send 'em back for free! They'll send you your new size before you even return the old ones, just call them! Great Service! Good luck!
  3. by   casualjim
    I got to tell you I was really impressed with Zappo's service as well. I got upgraded to 2 day UPS air and I didnt even ask for it. Their prices for a lot of shoes I was shopping for was actually lower than the manufacturer's site and free shipping to boot. Croc's was one of the ones that was cheaper at Zappos if I remember.
  4. by   tshores
    I don't understand the safety issues with the holes in the shoes. Most of us get more spills/splatters of everything on our scrub pants and tops, and that's just a thin piece of material covering bare skin. My feet are precious to me--that's why I wear Crocs with the holes with cotton socks--but no more precious than my legs, belly or chest. So unless you want to put me in a spacesuit, the logic just doesn't wash.
  5. by   Lacie
    I was always told the ones with holes on the tops were forbidden due to the risk of dropped sharps spiking through one of the open holes. Makes sense actually so I use the ones with the holes in sides only or no holes. Not much difference then wearing open toed shoes or sandles in the eyes of management.
  6. by   pghfoxfan
    CROCS did nothing for my aching feet. A good pair of running shoes works best for me.

    JCAHO needs to stop worrying about what a nurse looks like. I have been a nurse 24 years and my feet ACHE by the end of the day. I will wear WHAT EVER I can to help me make it through my shift.
  7. by   lupin
    What about the Danskos? Are there any drawbacks to those? I mean besides being 112 bucks. And incidentally, I bought a pair of the payless "knock off" crocs and I love them! They're all swirly with pink and green and blue, I call them my "superman ice cream" shoes.
    Anyway, I digress. I've always liked the look of the danskos but the last time I spent 100+ Bucks on nursing shoes was for a pair of Birkenstocks that the strap broke on a year later and guess what? No one could fix them. Even contacted Birkenstock themselves and was told I was SOL.
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I was always told the ones with holes on the tops were forbidden due to the risk of dropped sharps spiking through one of the open holes.
    Odds are the sharp is sharp enough to go through the foam rubber clogs that don't have holes.

    (ex. hypo, #11 blade)
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    What about the Danskos? Are there any drawbacks to those?
    The higher heel can make an ankle turn.

    Plus there's no much flexiability to the sole, so some people feel like they have wooden blocks on their feet.
  10. by   jannrn
    On this subject, has anyone seen the ones meant for gardening? they are just the same as many other "crocs" out there, but have a butterfly cutout. kinda cute. that is... if you or your facility is not opposed to the cutout. they are called sloggys.
    www.sloggers.com
  11. by   tshores
    Quote from Lacie
    I was always told the ones with holes on the tops were forbidden due to the risk of dropped sharps spiking through one of the open holes. Makes sense actually so I use the ones with the holes in sides only or no holes. Not much difference then wearing open toed shoes or sandles in the eyes of management.
    Still, there's more risk in sticking yourself somewhere else--hands, fingers, etc. and they don't make you wear leather gloves. I think it has more to do with tradition and appearance rather than safety. It hasn't been that many years ago that we weren't allowed to wear running/walking shoes (and some of those have only cloth over part of the toes), then the open heel they didn't like, and so on.
  12. by   guerrierdelion
    Quote from traumaRUs
    My only hesitancy for Crocs is that my feet sweat. Alright guys - how do you deal with that?
    Embedded silver fibers in socks. They really are effective in dealing with perspiration and odor.

    http://www.thorlo.com/mags/socks/eme...ontent_id=news

    http://www.drsocks.com/xstatic.shtml

    http://www.agactive.com/13.html

    :deadhorse
  13. by   GadgetRN71
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Odds are the sharp is sharp enough to go through the foam rubber clogs that don't have holes.

    (ex. hypo, #11 blade)
    Or sneakers, or for that matter, any pair of shoes that aren't steel reinforced. I have worn my Crocs with holes circulating and scrubbing(and I do Ortho exclusively now, can be very bloody cases as you know) and have had no blood on my socks at the end of the shift. I find in the OR that eye protection is a bigger deal.
    Also, I have various Jibbitz that fill in most of the holes, anyway.

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