Challenging paramedic exam

  1. 0
    Hi! I was wondering what states allow nurses to challenge the paramedic exam? Thank you!
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  3. 12 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    NJ has an MICN (mobile intensive care nurse) certification which functions the same as the MICP (mobile intensive care paramedic) certification. I don't know what the requirements are (I was a paramedic there) but if you call the office of EMS I'm sure they can fill you in.
  5. 0
    Here is a 2008 survery by the NASEMSO from some of the states that tell which professions can test out of the Paramedic exam.

    http://www.nasemso.org/NewsAndPublic...rvey051208.pdf

    Some like Florida require the EMT-B and then you just challenge their state exam.

    The states using the NREMT might get a little more complicated.

    California, which was not listed, but does allow after some requirements are met. The link below describes that process.
    http://www.emsa.ca.gov/paramedic/fil...RevOct2010.pdf
  6. 0
    In CO you can challenge the test but you also need to do a number of hours of precepted rides.
  7. 0
    Thanks!
  8. 1
    Do you think perhaps you might be doing yourself, potential employers and potential patients a serious disservice to become certified with no education or training on the prehospital environment to back it up?

    Put another way, how would you feel about paramedics "challenging" NCLEX? Do you think they would be prepared for a med surg assignment?
    Crispy Critter likes this.
  9. 0
    In NY you can challenge the medic exam as an RN but you must be an EMT first.
  10. 0
    The NCLEX is a silly exam. IMHO anybody who wants it can have it. It's the type of exam that you could have a panel of monkeys take (blindfolded) (with the Kaplan prep course/or studying on their own) and they would do just as well if not better... because no real medical/nursing knowledge is needed to take it, nothing about it is reality/practice/evidence-based.
  11. 2
    Quote from onaclearday
    The NCLEX is a silly exam. IMHO anybody who wants it can have it. It's the type of exam that you could have a panel of monkeys take (blindfolded) (with the Kaplan prep course/or studying on their own) and they would do just as well if not better... because no real medical/nursing knowledge is needed to take it, nothing about it is reality/practice/evidence-based.
    So the point is not really NCLEX (I've helped friends study, I have no doubt with a bit of preperation I could pass the exam) it's that even if I passed I would be massively unprepared for a 6 patient med surg assignment. The point I'm trying to get across is that a nurse with no specific out-of-hospital education is going to be jus as massively unprepared to take care of patients in that unique environment. The NREMT-P exam is just as silly as NCLEX and has about the same bearing on the reality of you being able to function in that role.
    Crispy Critter and netglow like this.
  12. 0
    Quote from usalsfyre
    Do you think perhaps you might be doing yourself, potential employers and potential patients a serious disservice to become certified with no education or training on the prehospital environment to back it up?
    The information for challenging the Paramedic can be used by anyone who feels they can take a test and has a decent reason for taking it. It is a loophole that can not be filled up because of the inconsistency in EMS education, accreditation and even testing. There are also nurses who may come from other countries with Nurse led EMS systems that far exceed the education and experience of the U.S. Paramedics who could be a welcome addition to any EMS agency or teaching faculty. The employer should be able to determine if a person is the right fit for their agency. In some places, the Paramedic cert is merely a formality to satisfy some state statute and it will the experience and license as an RN they will be using. Someone could also hold a Paramedic cert obtained through a full training program and not have been provided with adequate training yet still have the license. Again, the employer should determine the right person for the job.

    Put another way, how would you feel about paramedics "challenging" NCLEX? Do you think they would be prepared for a med surg assignment?
    There are educational requirements from an accredited training program that must be met first and nursing does it better with some consistency. Until EMS establishes the same consistency with increased education requirements in different areas with more clinicals and accreditation, this is a moot point. However, that is not to say that a Paramedic from another country might not come close to meeting those requirements and the board may review their clinical hours and background.


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