Can you practice as a RN before you take and pass the boards?

  1. Do they conditionally higher you as a Rn or something?
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   ohmeowzer RN
    no, honey.. you can sometimes work as a nurse apprentice through the RN school or a GN graduate nurse after you graduate.. but you can only work as a RN when you pass your boards. have you started school yet? good luck in your future.
  4. by   AspiringNurse7
    Quote from kizzykatlove
    no, honey.. you can sometimes work as a nurse apprentice through the RN school or a GN graduate nurse after you graduate.. but you can only work as a RN when you pass your boards. have you started school yet? good luck in your future.

    I didn't think so.I asked because I a came across a post where someone mentioned that she didn't get paid more money after passing her boards so I was wondering if employers conditionally higher new grads..And YUP , im completing my prereqs.Good Luck to you too!
  5. by   LPN4U
    For LPN's you have to have your license before you apply/work. On the other hand RN's can work without license but they have 90 days.
  6. by   caroladybelle
    It depends on the state/facility as to whether you can work as a GN prior to Boards or not. You need to ask the facility and check out the rules of your state. If you do work as a a GN, they usually require you take Boards as soon as possible, and if you fail Boards, you no longer can work as a GN.

    But you work as a GN, you are not an RN until after you pass Boards.
  7. by   BookwormRN
    Quote from LPN4U
    For LPN's you have to have your license before you apply/work. On the other hand RN's can work without license but they have 90 days.
    Actually, RNs cannot work without a license. If a facility hires you as a Grad nurse, your state can grant you a temporary license. This license is good for 90 days and if you fail boards, it is revoked.
  8. by   Zookeeper3
    Quote from BookwormRN
    Actually, RNs cannot work without a license. If a facility hires you as a Grad nurse, your state can grant you a temporary license. This license is good for 90 days and if you fail boards, it is revoked.

    I'm not sure of any state except NC, but we have graduate nurses, work in an orientation status under a licensed RN with a 90 day grace period. fail the boards or don't take them in 90 days you're fired. Don't mean to sound tough, but tell it like it is.
  9. by   BookwormRN
    Quote from Zookeeper3
    I'm not sure of any state except NC, but we have graduate nurses, work in an orientation status under a licensed RN with a 90 day grace period. fail the boards or don't take them in 90 days you're fired. Don't mean to sound tough, but tell it like it is.
    In WI, the Grad nurse who fails boards is not automatically fired. (Yes, in some facilities...) In my facility, you can be "bumped" down to a Nurse Tech status while waiting to retake boards. I guess all states/facilities are different.
  10. by   elkpark
    Quote from Zookeeper3
    I'm not sure of any state except NC, but we have graduate nurses, work in an orientation status under a licensed RN with a 90 day grace period. fail the boards or don't take them in 90 days you're fired. Don't mean to sound tough, but tell it like it is.
    In my experience (and I'm in NC), most facilities that still hire people as GNs don't fire them if they flunk boards and void their temporary permits, but they do demote them down to a CNA role (and pay rate) until they pass and get licensed. By the time GNs take boards and don't pass, the hospitals have already invested quite a bit of money, time, and effort in orienting them, and it is more practical and cost effective for the hospitals to let them continue working as a CNA temporarily than to fire them and start all over with someone new.
  11. by   NursingAgainstdaOdds
    It really depends on the state and facility. In NY you can work as a GN for a year, or until you pass/fail your boards. If you fail, the limited license is revoked, if you pass you're an RN.

    I worked for 4.5 months as a GN before taking (and passing, thank God) my boards.

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