Can Someone Be a Nurse Without Jean Watson?? - page 28

Ok now, as I delve back INTO nursing philosophy and theories, I come across, again, the theories of Jean Watson that have been hailed as the greatest thing since polyurethane IV bags - The Caring... Read More

  1. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from chadash
    OK, OK, now you got me interested. Energy field disturbance? Any klingons involved?
    No, but there might be a bit of a warped drive problem.
  2. by   BETSRN
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    No, but there might be a bit of a warped drive problem.
    This "energy field" disturbance stuff. Is this for real? No wonder nursing never gets anywhere. The PhD nurses who haven't taken care of a real person in 50 years are the ones making these ridiculous diagnoses, not to mention they are teaching our up and coming colleagues! Is it any wonder these new grads are so confused and overwhelmed?
  3. by   NurCrystal22
    I never heard of Jean Watson. But Whatever.

    I do care about my patients, simply because.... that's me.

    I think someone can be a nurse WITHOUT caring for or loving the patient, but one must CARE enough to do a good job, ya know...

    ~Crystal
  4. by   chadash
    Oh my, I thought nursing was based on science, not science fiction!
    as for caring, absolutely, we__I mean you'all nurses_must care.....
    That's all the CNA can do!
  5. by   sunnyjohn
    Energy field disturbance? You gotta be kidding me!
  6. by   menetopali
    no i'm not kidding about the "energy field disturbance" nursing diagnoses. it is in fact a "diagnosis" accepted and promoted by the North American Nursing Diagnoses Association, the group that academic nurses defer to for establishing what a nursing diagnoses is or isn't.

    further those who believe theraputic touch is 'scientific' actually cite this group as providing 'evidence' that "energy fields" exist and can be manipulated to improve healing.

    this kind of acceptance of questionable research chips away at the claim of nursing as 'evidence-based' and reduces the credibility of all nursing research.
  7. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from menetopali
    no i'm not kidding about the "energy field disturbance" nursing diagnoses. it is in fact a "diagnosis" accepted and promoted by the North American Nursing Diagnoses Association, the group that academic nurses defer to for establishing what a nursing diagnoses is or isn't.

    further those who believe theraputic touch is 'scientific' actually cite this group as providing 'evidence' that "energy fields" exist and can be manipulated to improve healing.

    this kind of acceptance of questionable research chips away at the claim of nursing as 'evidence-based' and reduces the credibility of all nursing research.
    NANDA? That explains it. I've been told that most experienced nurse think NANDA is a bit off. Is that true?

    Wll my parents always told me, "You've gotta get along to get on." I'll write the care plans using the off-beat theories if that is what my nursing instructors require for a passing grade.

    But I sure won't adopt theories in practice and personal life that are not sound. I guess an open mind is nedded, but not so open that all reasoning and common sense leaks out!
  8. by   menetopali
    used NANDA in school and haven't seen a NANDA dx in actual practice yet. i'm back in school and back to the insanity of nursing theory.
  9. by   chadash
    Quote from sunnyjohn
    my parents always told me, "You've gotta get along to get on." I'll write the care plans using the off-beat theories if that is what my nursing instructors require for a passing grade.

    But I sure won't adopt theories in practice and personal life that are not sound. I guess an open mind is nedded, but not so open that all reasoning and common sense leaks out!
    There is A LOT of wisdom in what you have said here.
    I think there is still some concern about where nursing is going, if the academic types are going for this stuff...
  10. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Which brings me back to my answer to the original question:

    Can you be a nurse without Jean Watson?

    Yes. The right question is: Can you be a nurse IN SPITE of Jean Watson? And again, Yes.

    Part of learning to be a nurse out of school is learning to assimilate what was important and dump the trash on the curb. Too much of nursing education is trash. And most of the busywork paperwork once in nursing: it's the theory garbage designed to fill space on the chart and fool JCAHO that our ivory towered theorists have any relationship to the real world.

    They don't.

    It's a game, and every nurse that wastes precious time during an admission or 'update' on these useless records knows it's not about satisfying any reasonable objective for patient care: it's about playing the game.

    And the downside of this 'fake' language we've designed, pretending it to be our 'base of knowledge', is that our other team members cannot understand us, and so dismiss us. So, in an attempt to appear 'professional', we've sold out any legitimate demonstration of professionalism.

    Someday, nurses will say what they mean, let others know what they know, and actually use it openly instead of pretending and hiding our true roles lest we dare trod on sacred ground. Those nurses will look back at us mystified that we deprived ourselves of our rightful place for so long.

    Until then, well, of course, there is Jean Watson and her type. . .

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  11. by   Tweety
    To me life is about taking in information and assimilating it into how I live my life and leaving the rest.

    But I think it's helpful to have a running definition and theories about how others view nursing and how they do nursing. For instance, someone say "you have to be caring to be a nurse". Well, what does that mean and how it is manifested in daily practice....please don't tell me "duh, just use your common sense". Or "nursing is science based", well, how do I use science at the bedside in taking care of patients. "Nusrsing is an art", what do you meant, how is that defined? Is it just tasks such as here's how to place a stethescope on a patient to listen to lung sounds, here's how to start an IV?"

    So how do you teach what it is that nurses do? I want to learn all that I can, and assimilate into my own daily nurses practice. I'm not going to dismiss a learned persons life work as Ivory tower BS without practical significance.

    On the other hand, I'm certainly not going to subscribe to any theory as to how I practice, it's going to be my own unique practice. If someone were to ask me what that is, I would have to probably use a lot of gobbledygook speak to get the point across. To me my nursing is not a theory, yet I'm also not a robot going through the motions and it's helpful to learn how others view nursing.

    I think it is very important to have a wide variety of nursing theoriest that we are required to study. These people are passionate about nursing, passionate about their studies, and it's not trash.

    A respectful humble opinion of course.
    Last edit by Tweety on Aug 24, '05
  12. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Tweety, I'm sure you are right, in many key respects. And I guess theorists have thier place.

    I just wish more of them had something to say that was actually practical at the bedside.

    I think the problem is that the politics of academia limit the practical usefulness of what an academic can say and be well-received by THAT community. And the process of the necessity to choose an "academic" point of view tends to have the result of making such observations mutually exclusive to reality. Hence the ivory tower.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  13. by   Tweety
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    Tweety, I'm sure you are right, in many key respects. And I guess theorists have thier place.

    I just wish more of them had something to say that was actually practical at the bedside.

    I think the problem is that the politics of academia limit the practical usefulness of what an academic can say and be well-received by THAT community. And the process of the necessity to choose an "academic" point of view tends to have the result of making such observations mutually exclusive to reality. Hence the ivory tower.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.


    Can't argue with you there Timothy. I get very frustrated with nurse academia language, especially in nursing diagnosises, but understand it's just a way to teach and describe, but their limitations are frustrating.

    A lot of what we learn in nursing school, nursing acedemia and co-reqs like History, English, etc. have no practical significance at the bedside. I'm not willing dimiss theory and other studies that don't fit in with my daily life as bedside nurse as trash.

close