Can I become a CNA at age 16? Can I become a CNA at age 16? | allnurses

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Can I become a CNA at age 16?

  1. 1 I'm 16 and I live in Texas. I would REALLY love to become a CNA. I know other people from my highschool that have become CNAs through HOSA, but I cannot be in HOSA. So, I am not sure if i could go through training at a nursing home, or of the only way to get training at 16 is through HOSA. I would love to do this durning the summer while i have time.
  2. 19 Comments

  3. Visit  TazziRN profile page
    #1 1
    Is HOSA like ROP? Yes, you can be a CNA but the question is would any place hire you at that age? CNAs have to pretty much work an 8-hour shift, and most places have evening shifts that end at 11, which causes problems for minors in school. You could work on the weekends, though, if a place would be willing to hire you.
  4. Visit  Kimmyyf profile page
    #2 0
    HOSA is a 'student organization whose mission is to promote career opportunities in health care'. I know a couple students in highschool who work at a local nursing home. They do work 8hour shifts. either 2-10pm. or 10pm-6am.
  5. Visit  NursKris82 profile page
    #3 1
    Maybe it depends on your state. In MI some schools have programs like this that prepare you to take your exam after you turn 18 and recieve either a high school diploma or GED.
  6. Visit  BradleyRN profile page
    #4 1
    I would certainly recommend working in an activities department at any long term care facility (nursing home). You will have a lot more fun doing crafts, playing games with elderly people and will be around many CNA's to decide if that job is right for you. Good luck and have fun!
    Last edit by BradleyRN on Sep 1, '08
  7. Visit  noc4senuf profile page
    #5 2
    I had 16 yr old CNA's in WI. We had PM short shifts from 5-9P. This worked out well for the high school students. Some of my best CNA's were the young ones.
  8. Visit  casi profile page
    #6 1
    Also check out community colleges for CNA training, you'll have to pay for it out of pocket, but if it's what you want it's an option.

    I know quite a few people who became CNAs at young ages. A lot of nursing homes have the 4-9 short shifts since it's such a busy time in LTC.
  9. Visit  racing-mom4 profile page
    #7 1
    My 16 year old just began her CNA training last week. She will work either 1st or 2nd shift this summer.

    Once school begins next fall she will work 1st shift on the Sundays only (due to soccer) and after soccer ends she will work after school 4-10 a couple nights a week and 1st shift weekends, as long as her grades are up.

    Our hosp and hosp owned nursing home are great with the teenagers and really accommodate their school/sports sched.

    If your unsure on where to take your training call the hospitals HR office and ask.
  10. Visit  classicdame profile page
    #8 0
    I am in Texas and work in a hospital. We do not hire anyone younger than 18 due to HIPAA. You have to be over 18 to sign a "contract" and that is what the compliance contract is all about.
  11. Visit  lvrs8489 profile page
    #9 0
    what are the requirements for cna? Im from texas also, how much is the tuition fee? im thinking of working as a cna while or during nursing school. it sounds a bit tough, but i think its one way to get use to the environment. any advice?
  12. Visit  L&Dnurse2Be profile page
    #10 2
    My CNA in Texas took 1 month of classes and clinicals. It cost $500. Testing was about 2 weeks after the class/clinicals were over. This was through a private company owned by an LVN. I made my money back very quickly after I started working. This was in Austin.
  13. Visit  MaRa0512 profile page
    #11 0
    I was wandering that myself.. I live in Texas as well.. I'm home-schooled right now but after this school year is over, i'm going to try to get a G.E.D. and then take some CNA classes. (hopefully) I'm afraid if i do this though no one will hire me. I'm gonna talk to some people that work at the VA where i live, i use to volunteer up there for about 4 years and then i got to high school and was involved with sports so i didnt have time, and then this year im home-schooled so im trying to i guess you could say get my life started. haha.. but im not sure how it will go.

    if you have any information please PM me.

    Last edit by rn/writer on Mar 11, '09 : Reason: Removed email address.
  14. Visit  HopeForMelissa profile page
    #12 1
    Kimmyyf.... I was a CNA at age 16! (That was 12 years ago.) I am in Georgia. My best friend and I heard an announcement over the school PA system saying that a local health care facility would be willing to hire and train. We checked it out and both of us got the job. The nursing home trained us and we took the state CNA test. I worked there for about 9 months after that. I have no regrets and I think it was a wonderful opportunity to "test the waters" in the healthcare field.

    I will caution you though about one aspect, if you plan to be a CNA in a nursing home rather than in another kind of setting such as a hospital. After losing 3 residents within the 9 months that I worked there, I quit because it was too much for me. (It is very easy to get attached to those little old people!) Looking back on it now....12 years later and taking prerequisite classes to get into RN school..... I think that I was just too young to handle it on my own. I'm not saying that you are too young. I'm saying that you just need to realize that people are not immortal, and you will have people that pass away. Make sure that you have a good support system and a seasoned nurse that you trust to talk to. I think if I had had that, I wouldn't have tried to keep all of my emotions to myself and would've stayed with it.

    Good luck! It is a very rewarding experience.