Calling off :-( - page 5

At our hospital, the policy is that if you have to call off, you need to find your own replacement. We are a critical access hospital so there are not a lot of staff on standby. The population of our... Read More

  1. by   Astris
    I have never heard of such a policy. If someone calls out sick on my unit it is the job of the clinical coordinators to cover it; if they are on PTO then it is the managers responsibility and after that administration.
  2. by   gaby19
    Working with a kidney stone?? That's crazy tough. But I can see how it could happen in a small town. We nurses can be pretty hard core, that's for sure.
    Last edit by gaby19 on Jul 8 : Reason: To call attentio ti which post I was answering.
  3. by   Here.I.Stand
    It just occurred to me that the hospital floor of my first employer (back on pg 1) used agency nurses. I remember a CNA who worked both hospital and LTC floors commenting "you can tell which cars belong to the agency nurses!" referring to the high-end cars parked in our lot. THAT is what your hospital needs to do if they are short staffed. NOT expect a nurse to 1) do their job with finding coverage, or 2) work while sick or hurt.
  4. by   HeySis
    I worked at a LTC facility that had the policy (i'm sure not written, but verbal) that if you called in with 4 hours of the start of your shift you had to find your replacement. They "waved it" for people they liked and were strict with people they didn't like. I don't work there anymore....even though I never called in sick, I didn't like "enforcing" that policy when I was charging.
  5. by   MaleICURN
    Not as bad as to find own replacement (sic!) but, to call in we have to make at least 2 calls: FIRST the manager (day or night), then House Supervisor. Good idea to call Charge Nurse on the unit.
    Prior to that experience I just called the Charge Nurse.
  6. by   kbrn2002
    I am shocked at how many respondents have worked for employers with such a ridiculous policy. Escalating disciplinary action for repeated call offs is ok, expecting someone to replace themselves when sick or injured is at best horribly punitive to the employee and at worst very dangerous to the patients. Do tbey really want a nurse with something highly contagious taking care of patients? Or even a nurse trying to work sick or injured that can't perform the job safely?
  7. by   Glycerine82
    You notified your work you're not going to be there, so they'll have to figure it out. Someone may get mandated to stay, but that's the name of the game.

    Having a policy like that is just management trying to scare you into always finding coverage before you call off, which - that wouldn't even be a call off if you covered your own shift.

    Just bring your doctors note and start looking for a new job.
  8. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from gaby19
    At our hospital, the policy is that if you have to call off, you need to find your own replacement. We are a critical access hospital so there are not a lot of staff on standby. The population of our town is about 1500.
    I had an injury before work today, got hit by a gate that a cow ran into when we were sorting. I passed out and when I came to, I had a forehead abrasion and pain in my L ribs.
    I was scheduled to work that night. So my question is...I was in NO shape to call around to find a repalcement. I called in to work and let them know what happened. They were very snotty to me on the phone. Needless to say I'm going to an ER 40 miles away to get checked out.
    Is this normal in other places? Especially critical access hospitals? I know we dont have staff but I can't function safely as a nurse with a head injury.

    Just when you think you've heard every way possible nurses are abused by their facilities...

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