Better to just call-in? - page 2

I work twice a month on a med/surg floor. I have a full-time job at another facility. About four weeks ago, I submitted my schedule request and got the days I asked for. Last week, I found... Read More

  1. by   Wsmith16
    Wow, I guess doing the right thing by giving advance notice works in some fields but not the nursing field. So now you are responsible and must find someone to switch with you. And what happens if you don't-- does that mean you can't have the day off even if you gave them advance notice?

    I guess next time you should just call in sick it will save you a whole lot of trouble. Gheesh...
  2. by   TazziRN
    Quote from Wsmith16
    Wow, I guess doing the right thing by giving advance notice works in some fields but not the nursing field. So now you are responsible and must find someone to switch with you. And what happens if you don't-- does that mean you can't have the day off even if you gave them advance notice?

    I guess next time you should just call in sick it will save you a whole lot of trouble. Gheesh...
    Look at it from staffing's point of view: they put out the schedule based on everyone's requests and the unit's needs. Then someone comes and says, "Oh, I need this day off." Staffing is not obligated to find your replacement. It's nice if they're willing to do that for you, but they honored the requests for scheduled days to work or have off. If the Someone then comes and messes up the schedule, why should staffing be the ones to have to fix it?
  3. by   Jolie
    What does your employment agreement require in terms of finding your own coverage for missed shifts? It sounds like you are a prn or casual staff member. Is it an expectation that employees of your status find their own replacements, or is the manager making this demand of only you?

    When I managed a unit, there was no requirement for any staff member to find his/her own replacement. Some did so out of courtesy when they knew in advance that they couldn't make it in on a scheduled day, which I really appreciated! Others would just call in, and it was up to me or the charge nurse to find a replacement, which was usually not a problem, especially with 3 weeks notice.

    I think it would be a good idea for you to make an attempt to find your own replacement. Do you have a list of staff members, phone numbers and access to the complete schedule? (All of my staff members did.) If not, could you drop by the unit and get access to this information in order to seek out a replacement?

    If after a good faith attempt, you are unable to find a replacement, then politely and professionally contact your manager and turn the matter back over to her. Let her know who you have contacted so that she doesn't bother these people by calling them again. Provide her with written notice that you wil be absent on that day, and then be prepared to accept the consequences. I can't imagine that you would be dismissed over 1 unexcused absence.

    As for calling in sick, I would never recommend that for this situation. It is unfair to all of the staff members to have to work short or do involuntary OT due to a sudden call-out that could have been covered with advance notice. Also, I don't know how big your town is, but chances are that you will run into someone who will recognize you at the conference, and word will get back to your unit that you were not ill.

    Please try and do the right thing by covering your shift, but if you are unable, it is ultimately up to the manager to determine how to handle the situation.
  4. by   bill4745
    For any change in the future, I would call out if they are not willing to meet your needs. Or stop all together. It's only two days a month-can you get OT at your full-time job?
  5. by   BNThere
    i think their approach is just another way to put it back on the nurse; like it's so easy to find a replacement - the whole world is short staffed! you've given them a fair notice; stuff happens that we can't foresee; i would let them do their jobs.
  6. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from appleheadRN
    I've let them know that I can't be there. I thought giving as much notice as possible would be appreciated, but I was wrong. I know I requested that date, but sometimes things happen. I've never done this before. I just expected a little understanding.
    I think your manager should be more understanding. It's not like you do it all the time, it's not like you're not dependable and it's not like you didn't give plenty of notice. It happened to me once and I told my manager I could not find a replacement and I was sorry but that I would not be there that day and I hoped she could understand. She did, she called the agency.

    If I had a manager that was not flexible I would call in the next time rather than ask for the day off. Honesty is the best policy, you told her the truth, she should be more understanding and appreciative of your honesty.
  7. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from BNThere
    i think their approach is just another way to put it back on the nurse; like it's so easy to find a replacement - the whole world is short staffed! you've given them a fair notice; stuff happens that we can't foresee; i would let them do their jobs.
    :yeahthat: :yeahthat: :yeahthat: :yeahthat: :yeahthat: :yeahthat: :yeahthat:

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