Bed Baths, I dread giving them. - page 3

OK, so now I'm going to split my 0.6 FTE on our small rural hospital 6 bed CCU/Stepdown unit half and half, 12 hour days and 12 hour nights, since some rare weekday dayshifts opened up. I'm keeping... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Oh i HATE the hospital-issue razors too! Even when the pt. was able to shave themselves, they would get cut.
  2. by   vampiregirl
    I discovered that warming up the lotion before applying to a resident makes a huge difference. I do that by either placing the bottle (after double-checking to make sure the cap was tight) under hot running water for a few minutes or soaking it for a few minutes in a cup of hot water (the lotion provided by the facility didn't have a paper label, all the info was printed on the plastic bottle).

    You know, I'm not a huge fan of giving bedbaths either, but I know how much I like to feel clean and fresh. I just remember this, and apply the "golden rule" as I'm providing care- treat others like I'd like to be treated.
    Last edit by vampiregirl on Jan 1, '07
  3. by   vampiregirl
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    I think the stuff we had was Aloe Vesta's SeptiSoap. I LOVE the smell of that stuff, it wasn't perfumy, just fresh.
    I agree! That stuff is awesome. Aloe Vesta also makes a fantastic cleasing spray. Not only does it smell great, but seems to be very gentle on the skin.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from emtrachel
    I agree! That stuff is awesome. Aloe Vesta also makes a fantastic cleasing spray. Not only does it smell great, but seems to be very gentle on the skin.
    That green foam stuff, that was great stuff.
  5. by   MIA-RN1
    I haven't done one since school but I always made sure to wash one body part at a time, dry it, and cover it. Keep the pt covered except for what I was washing. And I always asked if the pt preferred me to wash their face and privates, or if they would like to do it themselves.
  6. by   DizzyLizard
    A trick a nurse gave me is that pure vinegar will take out the seriously matted hair tangles. It worked for my pt, BUT, make sure the patient doesn't have any respiratory issues or sensitivities b/c you'll stink up the place with its strong odor. After washing the patients hair with vinegar I thoroughly rinsed it and then washed it like one normally would. After a good brushing I didn't have to cut her hair as originally thought.
  7. by   nuberianne_RN
    Hmmm......lotion in the water? Are you all saying to put lotion in the water with the soap? Is that to soften the skin or something? I am about to start my second semester in my nursing program and unfortunately only had the chance to do one complete bath and assist in another. By the way, I really appreciate the tips you all are giving in this thread.
  8. by   MsLady06
    Quote from mauxtav8r
    At my hospital the CNAs do baths. Since I'm a student I get to help them often. One very wise CNA advised the following:

    As was said several times above, use hot water in the basin (the cloth will not be too hot by the time the patient feels it). Add soap or lotion or oil.

    This is the key: Place like 5-8 washcloths in the prepared water in the basin, place the dirty linen hamper near enough to "shoot for two". Use the cloths and REPLACE THEM OFTEN. Never, ever, put a dirty cloth back into the clean water.

    This saves tons of time and the patients do notice that they are being cared for with clean cloths.
    I will keep this one in mind.
  9. by   Tweety
    Quote from nuberianne
    Hmmm......lotion in the water? Are you all saying to put lotion in the water with the soap? Is that to soften the skin or something? I am about to start my second semester in my nursing program and unfortunately only had the chance to do one complete bath and assist in another. By the way, I really appreciate the tips you all are giving in this thread.

    On people with very dry skin I sometimes put a little lotion on the wet wash cloth, but haven't tried putting it in the water.
  10. by   chadash
    These are great tips!
    About lotion in the water: sometimes we get neglected cases in the hospital, and it is less harsh on the elderly patients skin if I pre-lotion them, to soften the stuff. It washes of a bit more easily.
    This was a great question: how to give a bed bath. I thought I was doing OK, but did find I was doing a bit to dry of a bath recently. I was afraid that it would make the patient cold, but get them plenty wet and dry them fast.
  11. by   gwenith
    Every so often I will give the patient a "cream bath" rather than a soap bath. I work ICU so our patients are sponged every day. It does help and there is research that states that over cleansing can remove natural oils and increase the risk of skin breakdown.

    Now does anyone do "Hot Towel Sponges?"

    Very popular in one private hospital here. You get a bucket and fill with warm/hot water add some "Dermalux" or similar wash - some put in a drop of lavender. Then you add 3-5 rolled towels and let them soak. To sponge the patient you just lie the towels over them and rub with the towel. Relaxes the patient and is faster than a normal sponge.
  12. by   jadecope
    im not a nurse but had a bed bath after having my daughter and i found it easier to relax because the nurse was friendly, she was also quick but gental.
  13. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from moongirl
    Seriously?
    sorry for the "non contrbutory response" but I thought that mentioning how grateful families are for the pt receiving great care- including bed baths- would be an inspiration. I know that each time I make someone smell and feel better it makes me realize how I would want to feel if I were the one in the bed.

    Ask a CNA you work with I am sure they would be happy to show you proper techinque

    I dont believe I see "staff or moderator" within your name, so you should refrain your urge to rule posts
    I agree - with both this post and the first one you posted.

    I'm a nursing student and bed baths are something I honestly DREAD...until I start giving them. And I'm always pleased when either a patient comments that his or her family is coming that day and a bath is welcomed, or a family member comments on how nice their loved one looks. I, too, remember how nice it was to see my own dad while he was on a vent, looking like DAD and not some vagrant on a streetcorner (or, horrors, SMELLING like said vagrant) - and I think such comments are PERFECTLY appropriate.

    Well put.

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