Assisted Living

  1. I used to work for an adult day care/ respite center. I loved the work, hated the owner.
    On Wednesday, I have an interview for an assisted living, RN manager. Anyone have any insight for this position, salary range, etc???
    •  
  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   frustratedRN
    sorry tracey,
    i have no idea what that entails. sure would like to know tho.....let us know how it goes and whats involved. good luck!
  4. by   nur20
    THE ONLY THING I KNOW ABOUT IT IS FROM THE FLOOR NURSES POINT OF VIEW.YOU MIGHT AS WELL CALL YOURSELF THE MEDICATION NURSE, BECAUSE THAT'S ABOUT ALL YOU HAVE TIME FOR.BY THE TIME YOU FINISH ONE ROUND OF MEDICATIONS IT'S TIME TO START ALL OVER AGAIN. USUALLY YOU HAVE TO HUNT FOR PATIENTS BECAUSE THEY ARE ON THE MOVE AND THAT TAKES TIME. SOMETIMES THAT WANT YOU TO JUST LEAVE THE MEDS IN THE ROOM AND THE PT. WILL TAKE IT AND I HAVE A PROBLEM WITH THAT. SOME ARE SELF MEDICATING AND THAT MAKES ME NERVOUS, SO I'M PRETTY SURE THAT IS NOT MY NICHE.I IMAGINE THE MANAGER WOULD HAVE HIS/HER HANDS FULL BUT GOOD LUCK TO YOU. KEEP US POSTED LOL (NO PUN INTENDED)
    Last edit by nur20 on Oct 10, '01
  5. by   Slowone
    Here is my experience.
    i worked as the "Director" for an Assisted living. I managed all of the day to day admin work (ie finances, admissions a bit of marketing, etc...), I supervised the staff but was very rarely on the floor myself.
    In Washington most medications are "passed" by CNA's that have gone through a nursing delagation course. The role of the nurse, depending on level of care provided, can be limited. Limited to injections and dressing/wound care in some cases.
    In our state the salary can range from $45K/yr- $75K/yr,(RN and LPN) depending on the size of the facility, level of care provided and your related experience.
    The biggest part is being knowledgable regarding your state minimum requirements and regulations. They are constantly changing and can get licensed staff in trouble if they are not up to date with the standards.
    Get an updated job decription before you accept anything!

    That's my .5 cents worth, hope it helps!
    Keep us posted please, I am curious to hear how this works out.

    Slowone
  6. by   cargal
    I worked in one of those new "Victorian" beautiful buildings in assisted living for almost two years . At first I loved my job and couldn't believe I got paid for doing something I loved so much-well got over that real fast-lol. What I love about assisted living is that the nurse can focus on total health, the whole person, psychosocial, physical, pain, quality of life, etc.
    We had on RN per shift- sounds to me what you may experience. The residident co-ordinators gave all meds except coumadin, insulin, B-12s, and narcotics. They were the aids, and were trained sometimes less than a week. The premise is that these people are stable and able to live somewhat without constant supervision. (not true at least 25% of the time.) Also, each resident had their own mini apartment with bathroom, kitchenette etc. Alot of holes in the system. If they didn't subscribe to the breakfast plan- they went hungry until noon. I even made breakfast for some of my diabetics that I knew were cognitively incapable of getting their own. But it was not on the care plan or anything. I don't know what happened when I wasn't there, even if I put it on the care plan or asked for a care plan meeting. If I questioned this eyes were rolled or attempts at assuring me that the aids gave Mrs. Green breakfast were given, even though I never saw evidence of that! I worked part time and was "over ruled " on most suggestions of care by the nurse who wasn't in charge but really was!
    The aid shortage extended here , and our census kept rising to over 80 residents (behind apartment doors) and the aids kept dwindling. I was afraid to go in after a while for fear that there would be no aids. Most were working "guilt" overtime, and some were in there late 50's and 60's, and were just plain tired, and I don't blame them, they were tired and useless, and mad as hell. Just a warm body for the state requirements. One RN and eighty residents, who pay up to $2400 month for a married couple, is ridiculous. You need to know who is sick, go assess them , call the MD, get new orders or send them out, paperwork, check up on others who are back from the hospital , deliver new meds, give instructions, help the aids, activities, provide emotional support (hopefully) and is a big part because many of the people have little or no family and are lonely and scared and suffer from diminishing capabilities. Many have dementia and should be in other facilities, but the families desire that they stay there because it is their home. One woman was found at the end of the country road by other resident families more than once. Terminal care ( without IVs) is common because the resident wishes to die in their own bed. I have fed, toileted, consoled, turned, medicated, and sat with residents that, by law do not need constant care, but do. An aware family will hire an aid to be with them , which would help, but I didn't count on it. This is in addition to keeping an eye on the entire building as the RN is in charge, knowing what is going on with the other residents, who in the winter suffer from respiratory ailments etc etc etc. Wound care is provided also, usually in conjunction with home health two or three times a week. At the same time I had to take phone calls from family members and doctors, PT, the pharmacy etc. The phone rang constantly. If someone was going downhill they required alot of attention, and with eighty residents, there were usually three or four.
    I did like the autonomy but the staff shortage finally did me in. They became vicious and mean, unpleasant, untrained, and usually not present. I was forced to work double shifts if the oncoming nurse called off, or the no one could be scheduled.
    The staffing was unsafe, and the atmosphere dangerous. My health suffered and I had to quit. I even considered legal action against the administrator. She pit the employees against each other, and that is only the beginning; I won't elaborate there. I miss the residents greatly, and believe I have found my niche: just be careful what type of company you work for. I can't believe all companies are this bad, but remember, profit is the bottom line; that is okay, that is how the system works. But if you are working yourself to the bone to be an advocate within your own facility all the time, something is wrong.
    Good luck, I hope this helps. Contact me if you want further information.
    Carrie

close
Assisted Living