Anyone NOT use prefilled flushes? - page 4

I have experience at 2 hospitals as a student. One uses prefilled flushes (as I imagine most hospitals do) One does not. Supposedly it is cost saving. You have to open the syringe, wipe the tip of... Read More

  1. by   CritterLover
    the regular prefilled syringes arn't $10.00 each.

    i can't remember what they actually cost, but i think it is a little more than 50 cents each.

    i do know one of the outpatient areas that i work, we charge $1.00 for the ns and $2.00 for the heplock.

    and in general, they arn't sterile. yes, they come wrapped up in a wrapper, but the syringe itself isn't sterile. the "contents" (normal saline) is, but the outside of the syringe isn't. so, you cannot place them on a sterile field (such as for cvl placement). i've used a few different brands of these, and one brand has it printed right on the sryinge "do not place on sterile field."

    they do make sterile prefilled syringes, where the outside of the syringe is sterile as well, but they are extrememly expensive. we looked into getting them, but decided not to. so while it is possible that some facilities may carry the sterile prefilled syringes, they most likely are separated and not supposed to be used for "general purposes" (such as routine flushing).
  2. by   morte
    yellow heparin syringe=100 units per ml; blue= 10 units per ml
  3. by   Ophelia78
    When I was in school we drew up our own NS from individual 10mL vials. It was a no-no to draw from a bag or share it because of cross-contamination/sterility issues. When I graduated the hospital switched to pre-filled syringes. I loved them! We had 5mL and 10 mL syringes.
  4. by   ZippyGBR
    we don't have prefilled flushes we just have ampoules of 0.9%nacl which when the top ois snapped off fit quite happily on a luer and will fill the syringe without a needle quite happily
  5. by   truern
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    Besides, they are a convenient source for diluting Toradol or Phenergan for those PRN IV pushes! Simply slap a needle onto them, push out some saline and draw the med into the syringe and you're good to go!
    Roy, there's a huge sign in our pyxis room that the prefilled flushes are not to be used for diluting meds. WHY, I don't know. Sterile NS should be sterile NS whatever the source.
  6. by   morte
    Quote from truern
    Roy, there's a huge sign in our pyxis room that the prefilled flushes are not to be used for diluting meds. WHY, I don't know. Sterile NS should be sterile NS whatever the source.
    betcha some one put one down then forgot what they had done and used it as a flush....if you do use it to mix a med that way, need to label
  7. by   MS._Jen_RN
    Quote from meownsmile
    We used the individual NS bottles up until 4-5 years ago. The prefills are much easier and less risk of sticks. I would imagine much more cost for the facility, but in the long run cheaper than doing possible needlestick followups.
    If there is a needle stick getting saline out of a bottle, the needle is not contaminated and would not require the follow-up like it would if it were a needle that had touched a patient. If it happens there are no tests to run or anything. It's just like a normal cut. I don't get it. We use prefilleds and love them. Also more fair, we had to charge a patient for a bottle and then it was used for other patients as a multidose bottle.
    ~Jen

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