ADN vs BSN

  1. Is there really a difference between ADN and BSN nurses? Do you think that only BSN programs should be offered?
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   Headhurt
    Oh for goodness sake! This tired old subject again.


    This subject has been beaten to death in this life and the next. I suggest you use the search feature for these boards so you can read all about (over and over again) the age-old BSN vs. ADN vs. LPN debate.
  4. by   Tweety
    Headhurt, if you look at the # of posts the op has, you might realize it's a perfectly reasonable question, so please calm down and give the op a break. LOL

    To the original poster, it's a heated topic as you might now guess. I do suggest you use the search feature for the very wide variety of opinions on this topic.
  5. by   Cadeyl
    Thanks, Tweetie. This was something just briefly mentioned in my nursing class a couple months ago. I'll go check out the topic on a search engine for info.
  6. by   Tweety
    It's a hot topic. Basically when RNs both BSNs and ADNs get out of school and hit the floors, their job descriptions are the same as they both are learning bedside nursing from scratch. So there really isn't much difference there. The benefits of a BSN come later as the nurse advances in their career.

    There are all kinds of heated opinions over which is the better nurse, and which should be the standard.
  7. by   catcolalex
    I am an ADN getting a BSN and I think it has to do with ego and money for the nursing schools, i haven't learned anything new in my adn-bsn
  8. by   Monist
    The only education that is required is what the industry demands. Formal education marches to the beat set by the industry it serves. The rest is just smoke and mirrors and academic musing. Right now, the industry demands an ADN or even a diploma. This will continue for as long as there is a shortage of nurses. If there was a shortage of social workers, they'd only be required to have an associate degree as well. It used to be that a psych tech needed a bachelor's degree--now they don't need any degree at all.


    The Monist
  9. by   mitchsmom
    Just my personal reasons for BSN:

    I am getting a BSN because I must have it to go on to grad school to be a nurse-midwife.

    If I didn't already have a 4 year degree I'd want it in case I needed/wanted it for some other job position (not necessarily nursing... you know how some jobs just require a 4 year degree as an "x" in the block... I'm not agreeing with that kind of policy, just saying I would want it for that reason among many. One of my previous jobs at a children's mentoring agency required a 4 year degree, didn't matter what in or anything...).

    As a regular nurse it apparently doesn't make much if any difference though. It really depends on what your future nursing goals are, I think.

    If there was a shortage of social workers, they'd only be required to have an associate degree as well
    I don't really agree with this idea, there is always a need for teachers and they can't just go get a 2 year degree to meet the shortage needs.

    I think that all fields are just requiring more and more formal education. Soon you'll have to go to college to flip burgers at McDonald's.
    Last edit by mitchsmom on May 11, '04
  10. by   llg
    Quote from catcolalex
    I am an ADN getting a BSN and I think it has to do with ego and money for the nursing schools, i haven't learned anything new in my adn-bsn
    If you are spending all those hours in school and not learning anything ... then you are either going to a school that is not very good ... or not making much of an effort to learn ... or maybe a combination of both.

    Schools provide the opportunity for education, but the student has to make the most of the opportunity in order to get benefit from it. I have known lots of people to go back to school for BSN's at the same programs to each other. Those with a positive attitude always find something valuable to learn. Those with a negative attitude do not.

    Life and education is what you make it.

    llg
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I think nursing makes a mistake in demanding a BSN only as a 4 year degree. I think coupled with an ADN (the real core of RN nursing), it would be easier to get people to go on for 4 year degrees---- if they could chose more what to pursue. As for me? I would choose a BS with an emphasis on biological sciences, coupled with my ADN, it would be dynamic enough, I think. I don't like that I have to go on for a BSN (sigh), and like the poster above, I am not getting too terribly much from these courses that I can use. It's not that I am not trying, but they are not what I wish to study or even NEED in what I do. it's filling squares, simply and writing checks to pay for it all. sigh.......
  12. by   momx2
    See how crazy this is- I graduated from an AD program last May. My husband is in a BSN program right now. He will tell you in a heartbeat that he wishes he had gone to a AD program (which he got accepted also but chose the BS). He said it is all about paperwork whereas with the AD program, we are all about "hands on". I actually had to write his documentation for insertion of foley and IV because he didnt know how when he had to pass off on them. The BS program has a lot more paperwork than the AD and it is a lot about writing papers and that sort of thing.

    And I am not at all putting down BS programs: This is from my husbands mouth who is in the BS program. I do think the BS programs prepare you better for boards than the the AD programs.

    J
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    no, there is where you are wrong: the Bs programs do NOT prepare us better for boards. Just check pass rates, they run neck and neck......NCLEX pass rates are very close for all graduates, be they diploma, AD or BSN-prepared.
  14. by   mitchsmom
    Quote from momx2
    See how crazy this is- I graduated from an AD program last May. My husband is in a BSN program right now. He will tell you in a heartbeat that he wishes he had gone to a AD program (which he got accepted also but chose the BS). He said it is all about paperwork whereas with the AD program, we are all about "hands on". I actually had to write his documentation for insertion of foley and IV because he didnt know how when he had to pass off on them. The BS program has a lot more paperwork than the AD and it is a lot about writing papers and that sort of thing.

    And I am not at all putting down BS programs: This is from my husbands mouth who is in the BS program. I do think the BS programs prepare you better for boards than the the AD programs.

    J
    I think they do that because they are assuming that the BSN student may one day be interested in a role that would include more writing (management, advanced degree, advanced practitioner, etc.). But as far as I know the clinical hours are about the same, at least in my area.

    And my BSN program's NCLEX rates are way worse than my local ADN's, but they all vary. I would advise to look up the rates for the individual school if that is a deciding factor.
    Last edit by mitchsmom on May 11, '04

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