A vet tech as a nurse ?

  1. I went to a doctors apt and I was told to give my info to the nurse .
    My "nurse" walks in I found out she was not a nurse but a former ?? The hole thing was just odd .
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  2. 30 Comments

  3. by   Cuddleswithpuddles
    Was she doing actual patient care or more like clerical duties? Maybe she is an office worker who happens to be a former vet tech and was just another non-nurse being called a nurse for convenience's sake?

    I hate that CNAs, MAs and many non-nursing workers are called often called nurses simply because they wear scrubs and work around sick people.
  4. by   Hands&Feet
    I saw a classified ad just a few weeks ago for a "Veterinary Nurse." Qualifications - HS diploma or GED.
  5. by   LoveMyBugs
    A classmate of mine in nursing school was a vet tech, he worked the NOC shift at the office monitoring all of the animals, and was able to study.
    However during clinicals he would always make nursing relate to veterinary care, as Oh I know what this anti suzieure medication dose, just not used to giving such big doses, cats take smaller doses etc...

    As for the OP was the person a MA or CNA? who used to be a vet tech
  6. by   RaineyRN
    I'm a BSN, who used to be a vet tech. Don't knock his experience, just because it was on animals. I had a lot of knowlege that no one else in nsg school with me did, because of it. Even those that worked for years as PCTs didn't have a clue when it came to the meds, induction of anesthesia, how to hand bag a ventilated pt, how to start IV's and draw on a wiggly critter that was trying to bite you, the list goes on.... Vet techs get to do things that RN's will never do on people.
  7. by   nerdtonurse?
    In my state, an LPN can work as a vet assistant with the addition of one or two classes; I've got a friend who went from LPN to RN who still works 1 day a week at the vet's -- she says she likes the patients better. *grin*
  8. by   rn/writer
    Quote from nerdtonurse?
    In my state, an LPN can work as a vet assistant with the addition of one or two classes; I've got a friend who went from LPN to RN who still works 1 day a week at the vet's -- she says she likes the patients better. *grin*
    Yeah, you can muzzle them. Only kidding, folks, only kidding.
  9. by   ProfRN4
    I worked as a vet tech for a brief time. They trained me on the job (it was at a large animal shelter). I learned quite a few skills and things that transferred to nursing school. I medicated all the animals and worked in the "pharmacy". I would speak to the new moms and dads about the condition their animal had, and instruct them about the meds. I didn't do nearly as much as many of the other techs did/do.

    I have relatives that work in an animal hospital. One is essentially the equivalent of a nurse. I don't believe there is an educational equivalent of a nursing degree for animals, so I really don't have a problem with people referring to them as nurses. (I HATE when they do in other capacities though). These people have a tremendous knowledge base. When my cat was sick last year, my relatives were spot on in advising us as to what his condition could be before we went to the vet.

    The thing that fascinates me about vets (and their "nurses" and techs) is that they have to know how to treat so many different species. All we have to deal with are humans (and that's hard enough ).
  10. by   Hospice Nurse LPN
    I was a vet tech in my former life. At least w/ human pts, most will not try to bite you when you are starting an IV.
  11. by   synergy89
    There is a difference between a veterinary assistant (no college experience required) and a registered veterinary technician or technologist (which require a 2-4 year degree like a RN is required). As mentioned, RVT's are highly skilled clinicians who do physical assessments, admit, discharge, triage, administer medications, venipuncture, give blood products, etc just like us nurses. Furthermore, they do many things most non-advanced practice or careflight nurses will never do such as insert venous catheters and/or draw blood off jugular, femoral, etc veins. Administer anesthesia, monitor during anesthesia, intubate, calculate anesthetic dosages, assist in surgery (typically a surgical first assistant's job), assist and in some cases perform dentals, etc. Just because they don't treat human's doesn't make their job any less important. And yes LovemyBugs, that classmate of yours does know what he is talking about in regard to anti-seizure medications. The mechanism of action is still the same. Heparin will always be heparin, a beta-blocker will always be a beta-blocker, an anti-convulsant will always be an anti-convulsant. Just because they are different dosages does not change their MOA across species. I'm not a RVT but felt the need to comment in this thread with some of the misinformation presented.

    http://www.avma.org/education/cvea/cvtea_appendix_i.asp
  12. by   CapeCodMermaid
    Quote from Hospice Nurse LPN
    I was a vet tech in my former life. At least w/ human pts, most will not try to bite you when you are starting an IV.
    Apparently you haven't worked in many SNFs! Nothing as challenging as trying to start an IV in a demented 96 year old whose sole purpose at the time is to connect her teeth with your skin.
  13. by   Trekfan
    She was a RTV and this was a Chiropractic office that I went to to be put into traction after my car wreck , she did bp.x-rays , and she did put me into traction ?
  14. by   Trekfan
    Quote from Hospice Nurse LPN
    I was a vet tech in my former life. At least w/ human pts, most will not try to bite you when you are starting an IV.
    Hahahaha
    I was going to be a vet tech but I drop out because I could not stand to see dogs and cats in pain .

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