"Safe Injection Houses"- What's This?" - page 3

A "safe house" for drug users to use drugs with clean equipment and trained professional supervision using public funding.....what the what????!!! Am I reading this correctly? This instantly... Read More

  1. by   not.done.yet
    Proud American here and I would argue that those addicted to drugs are ALSO victims of it. This "Screw them, they ASKED for this by not stopping doing drugs" mentality has gotten us exactly where we are - a dirty disease in which the primary intervention is public shame, as evidenced by this thread.

    I do not think clean/safe houses are the answer, but I sure as heck know that the attitude of "help the victims, screw the addicts" isn't the answer either. Until we start to see this as a disease, research it as a disease and treat it like a disease, it is going to continue to kill, both those affected by the disease and those caught in the line of the disease fire. I find the willingness to throw out the addict completely to be shameful.

    It should not be mutually exclusive. We can help victims of the violence drugs brings AND help the addict too. Both can be done with humility and compassion.
  2. by   Not_A_Hat_Person
    My town, which recently banned cigarette smoking in parks, is seriously considering safe injection sites for heroin users.

    I used to live near a methadone clinic. Apparently, it was a great place to score drugs. It attracted a lot of drug sellers and thieves. I also lived in a town that somehow thought it was a good idea to put a methadone clinic next to a high school.

    In my opinion, if safe injection sites are such a good idea, they need to go in wealthy neighborhoods. Anyone who supports the idea should have to live next door to a safe injection site for a year.
    Last edit by Not_A_Hat_Person on Feb 13
  3. by   kbrn2002
    While I fully agree that addiction is a disease that is poorly manged it's not just the addict that is affected. I have a hard time getting on board with a program that condones and supports illegal drug use rather than treatment. Unfortunately addiction is disease that does as much harm to the addicts families, friends and community as it does to the addict. It's not OK with me to provide a safe house to inject drugs that were purchased with money that was stolen from their families, friends or from strangers when the well of money from family and friends ran dry.
  4. by   elkpark
    Quote from kbrn2002
    While I fully agree that addiction is a disease that is poorly manged it's not just the addict that is affected. I have a hard time getting on board with a program that condones and supports illegal drug use rather than treatment.
    Supervised injection sites are not condoning and supporting drug use rather than treatment, part of the point is to provide a pathway to treatment.
  5. by   squishyfish
    Next let's open a "safe house" for non-compliant diabetics to eat as much junk food and sugary sweets as they want, with absolutely no consequences. They're going to do it anyway and we'll be there to bail them out when they go into DKA!
  6. by   Glycerine82
    It's an epidemic. Take it from someone who lives a stones throw from Cape Cod.

    These places save resources, provide assistance when the person is ready and make it safer all around.

    Addicts are going to use until they choose to get help. Thats all there is to it.
  7. by   tmc843
    While I understand and appreciate points made by both sides of this debate, I still have trouble getting on board with this concept. I acknowledge that this drug crisis is a rapidly growing epidemic in this country that looks to be spiraling out of control. It is time for the government and healthcare community to work together to find long lasting solutions. I have not read the studies that show how these safe sites have benefited communities in other parts of the world, but I can't help but wonder if these "benefits" are only short-term. The underlying issue is still not being addressed and I see this as nothing more than enabling and offering a short-term solution, which to me, isn't a solution at all.
  8. by   Triddin
    Quote from tmc843
    While I understand and appreciate points made by both sides of this debate, I still have trouble getting on board with this concept. I acknowledge that this drug crisis is a rapidly growing epidemic in this country that looks to be spiraling out of control. It is time for the government and healthcare community to work together to find long lasting solutions. I have not read the studies that show how these safe sites have benefited communities in other parts of the world, but I can't help but wonder if these "benefits" are only short-term. The underlying issue is still not being addressed and I see this as nothing more than enabling and offering a short-term solution, which to me, isn't a solution at all.
    If it was just safe injection sites, I would agree with you. However, the sites (again, basing this off the Vancouver model) promote detoxification and rehabilitation. They have an interdisciplinary team involved in addressing the cause of a patients addiction and trying to work with the patient to address concerns. I recommend reading through the link I attached in the first post. It's a summary of the peer reviewed research published and written in a manner that makes it accessible.
  9. by   nursesunny
    I love that they draw the line at smoking...lolololol....
  10. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Sour Lemon
    Where do these hard-core addicts get the money for their daily highs? And how much of that type of crime is drug related? I've been robbed at gunpoint a few times. The thought of the robber hopping over to get high in a safe and supervised situation makes me ill.
    How many is a few? You have been quite fortunate.
  11. by   Munch
    I haven't read all of the responses yet apologies if I am redundant. I am all for harm reduction. As a nurse anything to help keep a person alive can't be a bad thing. The idea that safe injection sites or needle exchage programs encourage drug use and cause people who don't use to start using is preposterous. Actually most needle exchange and supervised injection sites also provide resources to addicts who are ready to get clean. In Manhattan at one needle exchange program they have a bathroom with an intercom in it and if someone goes in there they are required to check in every 2 minutes or so and if someone stops responding the door is unlocked and someone is standing by with narcan. They have saved 25 plus lives since implementing this. Its not a supervised injection site officially but same concept. Addicts lives are worth saving just as much as anyone else's. Until some better solution comes along people are going to do drugs. No getting around that.
  12. by   Munch
    Quote from tmc843
    While I understand and appreciate points made by both sides of this debate, I still have trouble getting on board with this concept. I acknowledge that this drug crisis is a rapidly growing epidemic in this country that looks to be spiraling out of control. It is time for the government and healthcare community to work together to find long lasting solutions. I have not read the studies that show how these safe sites have benefited communities in other parts of the world, but I can't help but wonder if these "benefits" are only short-term. The underlying issue is still not being addressed and I see this as nothing more than enabling and offering a short-term solution, which to me, isn't a solution at all.
    Enabling? You think not having a supervised injection site around is going to keep drug use down? They will just use in pubic restrooms or in the park or wherever. Having a place to do drugs is the last thing on an addicts mind. These places just have medical help standing by in case of an overdose. They are handing out Narcan now at Rikers Island to inmates upon discharge. Until better solutions come about the only thing we can do is make sure these addicts don't spread disease and stay alive long enough to make the decision to get clean.
  13. by   bikegirl
    You noticed that too, Fiona59? As an American, I want to state that we seen to like punishing people with certain illnesses. I'm not sure where that comes from, possibly from our Puritan roots.

    I think the idea of 'safe houses' is a great idea. At least let's try.

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