specialites with little experience?

  1. 0
    Hello,
    I am a new grad on a very busy, very stressful, with very critical pts IMCU/telemetry unit 12 hour nights. I am quickly finding out that this is not a good learning environment for me and I am CONSTANTLY making mistakes. I am now at the 6 month mark, and I am still hating every minute I am there. (mistakes+nonsupportive day shift nurses+bad orientation)
    Needless to say, I want to quit my job; but I need to accept another job elsewhere before I do so. Any sugestions on any other areas of nursing I can go into with six months?
    -I was thinking maybe OR? is that a good environment for a new grad? I figure it is completely new and easier to get a job there and quit my job
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  3. 9 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    all nursing jobs are specialities anymore. That said, there is probably one that will appeal to you elsewhere. I would first go to HR to see about a transfer. That is cheaper for them than replacing you. No matter where you go, when you interview ask about the orientation process. How long will you have a preceptor? How long is orientation? Overall, nursing is hard, so do not expect a walk in the park anywhere. Good luck!
    LadyFree28 likes this.
  5. 2
    What are you finding challenging? I wouldn't assume that the OR is easier....all those instruments....counting all the sutures,needles,sponges. Packing the patient up, positioning...don't bail before you've had the chance to learn it takes at least a year.

    What are you having issues with?
    LadyFree28 and Fiona59 like this.
  6. 0
    it just seems like I am having issues with everything. The floor is just very stressful for me so managing 5 patients when most of them are critical and can go down at any moment, understanding telemetry (even with a course), understanding what to do in a critical situation, anxiety, I keep making mistakes in general and with charting (blood forms, restraint forms- even when I really thought I crossed my t's dotted my i's), starting IVs (I've taken an IV course, i've only ever started 4 in the like 50 attempts i've made), my confidence is dwindling. and when I finally have a good night the day shift nurses rip me a new one for not knowing one stupid little thing off the top of my head. I am losing myself in this job. I've given it a full go and shot, but I just keep coming home wanting to cry. I'm just not happy anymore and its just not worth it to me anymore.
  7. 3
    I wouldn't think OR is a good specialty for a new grad. Every clinical I have been in the OR it's the surgeon, nurse anesthetist, surgical tech, and maybe someone assisting the surgeon. The nurse is charting the whole procedure making sure all instruments are accounted for. And I can only imagine is the only one documenting when things really go sideways.
    LadyFree28, Madras, and GrnTea like this.
  8. 6
    I was talking to a nurse whose friend is in the OR and has been her entire nursing career. She is now bored and wanting to transfer, but she can't as she lacks bedside experience (go figure).

    I've been told it takes one year to become competent, two to become confident and five to become an expert.
    ADeks, Altra, SunshineDaisy, and 3 others like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from irishlynn5
    it just seems like I am having issues with everything. The floor is just very stressful for me so managing 5 patients when most of them are critical and can go down at any moment, understanding telemetry (even with a course), understanding what to do in a critical situation, anxiety, I keep making mistakes in general and with charting (blood forms, restraint forms- even when I really thought I crossed my t's dotted my i's), starting IVs (I've taken an IV course, i've only ever started 4 in the like 50 attempts i've made), my confidence is dwindling. and when I finally have a good night the day shift nurses rip me a new one for not knowing one stupid little thing off the top of my head. I am losing myself in this job. I've given it a full go and shot, but I just keep coming home wanting to cry. I'm just not happy anymore and its just not worth it to me anymore.
    I have felt like this a great deal. I've sought advice from more experienced nurses both on my unit and off my unit. The consensus is that nursing is an overwhelming field regardless of the specialty you choose. If you love the specialty, it makes handling the tricks of the trade just a little bit less upsetting. You can still have an off day and feel as though you've made a difference and that you're learning. Acquiring proficiency, as I'm learning, is one daunting task. I'm at the 6 month mark as well and I leave work every single day feeling like I can't believe just how little I know, but also shocked at how much I managed to learn in a 12-hour span.

    Hang in there, dear. And if you truly think it is the unit, I'd go with the advice of speaking to your HR department.
  10. 10
    Where is it written that you must feel perfectly at ease in a mere six months? And if you're working 3 twelves a week, that's not very many shifts (compare to the old days when you would work 5 shifts a week -- many more opportunities for learning sooooo many things).

    There are very good reasons why everyone here is telling you, in on way or another, that 1) the grass is not greener on the other side of the fence, and 2) you haven't given it or yourself enough time to know what you're doing yet. And finally, no, you won't get another job on six months' experience, especially if you haven't gotten enough experience in those six months to feel a beginning level of competence. Which takes longer than six months.

    So no. Stick it out, don't panic, and remember that if you were a total loss, they'd have let you go by now. You still have a job. Do keep doing the best you can, stop feeling terrified and upset and all those other bad words. Tell yourself you're excited to go to work every shift and learn something new, and this will help (really). You have had some days where things were OK? Let that tell you something encouraging. We have all been there, really. You can do this.
    Curious1alwys, Altra, SunshineDaisy, and 7 others like this.
  11. 1
    Have you thought about switching to nights? Is that a possibility for you? The pace may be slower and you will be with a different group of nurses...chin up!
    ADeks likes this.
  12. 0
    You are a new grad. The learning curve is a lot longer than six months. Wait until you've been there at least a year, & then see how you feel. In the mean time, have you considered employee assistance to help you deal with stress?


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