New RN - what would you do? - page 2

I recently finished school in December and passed the NCLEX in January, and began my first job as an RN about 3 weeks ago. Even though I am a new nurse, I have worked in healthcare in one way or another for almost 20 years, and... Read More

  1. 0
    One of my first jobs at 19 was a receptionist in a walk in clinic and we called in scripts daily. One of the reasons I'm so good at reading docs handwriting now.

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  2. 0
    For years I called in scripts as an MA in an orthopedic surgeon practice and I've also done it as an RN. I speak directly with the pharmacist and get their name and they get mine. You aren't prescribing, you're essentially "dropping off" the RX for the patient. Of course, each state or facility may be different. We keep the written RX from the MD in the chart.
  3. 0
    I've never called scripts in when I worked in sub acute. The NPs and Docs filled out the prescription order form with their DEA#, signature and etc. Nurses simply faxed them in.
  4. 0
    Check your hosptial policy and BON policy. Doesn't sound right to me.
  5. 0
    At the dental offices that I have worked at, we've regularly called in rxs that the dds rxd. It's not really a big deal.
  6. 0
    Strange that some people think its ok and others not. I have never been in a clinic setting where the Md's call their own RX's in. Especially now with electronic charting, the only thing us nurses called in were narcotics.
  7. 0
    We do NOT call in any kind of scripts...ever. Do you realize the DEA is trying to prevent NPs and PAs from writing scripts for any drug containing hydrocodone??? The kind of practice you're describing gives them the kind of ammunition they'll need.
  8. 1
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    We do NOT call in any kind of scripts...ever. Do you realize the DEA is trying to prevent NPs and PAs from writing scripts for any drug containing hydrocodone??? The kind of practice you're describing gives them the kind of ammunition they'll need.
    The FDA panel is recommending moving hydrocodone to schedule II category if that is what you mean; this would make hydrocodone scripts ineligible to be faxed or called in to the pharmacy (a paper script would be required to be hand delivered to the pharmacy).

    It is common practice for a nurse in a clinic to call in a general or schedule III prescription - you are not prescribing it yourself, you are acting under an order from a practitioner and delivering the information for the pharmacy to prescribe the drug under the doctor's name. Having the DEA number gives the pharmacy confirmation that it is a legitimate script. Doctors must give the DEA number when they call in a script too.

    Think of it this way, doctors give verbal orders to dispense medications to patients in the hospital or nursing home, and the nurse in turn gives the information to the in-house pharmacy to dispense the medication to you so you can give it to the patient. Its not a whole lot different to do it with an outside pharmacy, they just need the DEA. Obviously verbal orders are not ideal due to the potential for errors in transmission of the information.

    OP, having been bestowed a license means that you have the responsibility of having sensitive information (and easy access to drugs, etc) and you are held to the high standard to not misuse that. DEA numbers are not given out to the general public, but to a licensed nurse is a different story. There is nothing unusual about calling in a script when you have a legitimate order to do so.
    Last edit by Ayvah on Mar 14, '13
    ILoveSpring&Fall likes this.
  9. 0
    The DEA is usually written on scripts so even the patient can see it if they are given the script themselves. I called in scripts all the time after they were written.
  10. 0
    I am in L&D and do it for our doctors regularly

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!


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