Got "nurse face"? How'd you get it? - page 3

"Nurse face" = the calm, collected expression that a nurse wears I am a BSN, graduated Sept, no job yet (but looking hard), 2 years experience in LTC, and right now doing temporary... Read More

  1. by   SoldierNurse22
    The trick to having a good "nurse face" is having a safe spot/confidant where you DON'T have to have a "nurse face" afterward!
  2. by   teeniebert
    Quote from Anoetos
    "freaking out" is, at best sub-therapeutic and unprofessional and at worst a guaranteed ticket to corrective action.
    This is brilliant--do you mind if I use it?
  3. by   VICEDRN
    Confidence. After a while, you see enough stuff that you learn not to judge what's around the next corner. Once you accept that, they could throw anything at you and you won't freak out. People who aren't confident eventually find something to freak them out.
  4. by   royhanosn
    its my protection! Its the thick skin you develop during the course of your work. Otherwise you leave yourself open. Watch the some doctors how they talk to patients & other staff. Learn from them. When your trying to get stuff done, you have to ignore people around you otherwise, you will get behind. Its not all flowers and chocolates, its work you have to do.
  5. by   HollyBSNtoNP
    Haha, I've never heard the term "nurse face" before, although most nurses can pull off a great poker face. I have worked with a few nurses who have a very expressive affect which never influenced the care they gave, while on the other hand I've worked with nurses who had a "nurse face," but would run around like a chicken with their head cut off. The latter of the two types negatively affects my work atmosphere as I am constantly distracted and often have to give them support (not helping with the patient, but helping the nurse calm down).

    You say the tension "gets to your face" - is it because you are concentrating or are you having issues with multitasking?
  6. by   Cinquefoil
    Dear HollyBSNtoNP,

    I'm brand new at this, so....yes to both.
  7. by   sixela21
    Emotionally detached nurse...I am not mocking you at all--it is actually a good skill to have at times. I believe there has to be some balance between empathy and being able to compartmentalize--otherwise you will go insane. I am way too empathetic. I wish I was able to do this.
  8. by   SCSTxRN
    Botox.

    My thoughts, expressions, feelings are written all over my face. I worked on the nurse empathy, but if I don't want everything to show, Botox is my only option.
  9. by   WildflowerRN
    When a patient is awake and in pain, I use my "I hate that you're hurting face. What can I do to make it better?" face. But sometimes, putting emotions aside and making quick decisions in the situation is what's called for. If a family member or patient seems upset, I explain. Worked for me so far.
  10. by   Beautiful Mind RN


    I think you start developing the 'nurse face' or something similar to it the moment you enter into the customer service field...
    It helps to cushion and brace for the unexpected...


    For being in the customer service field for almost 10 years, I have perfected mine through...well, experience. I am sure it will only become more refined as I journey through nursing school...
    Last edit by Beautiful Mind RN on Dec 30, '12
  11. by   tyvin
    I've never heard of "nurse face"... I wear my emotions on my sleeve so I've learned to keep that in check as to not freak any patients out. I wear my professional hat when dealing with patients (same thing).
    Last edit by tyvin on Dec 30, '12
  12. by   subee
    Quote from sixela21
    Emotionally detached nurse...I am not mocking you at all--it is actually a good skill to have at times. I believe there has to be some balance between empathy and being able to compartmentalize--otherwise you will go insane. I am way too empathetic. I wish I was able to do this.
    Maybe it would help if you think of it as an issue of needing to develop healthier boundaries rather than too much empathy. You are not the patient; the patient is not you. Once you incorporate better separation, you'll be able to survive the onslaught of emotions that can constantly grind you down.
    Of course, there are exceptional patients that make you cry when you get home but better that be the rare case rather than the common.
  13. by   NutmeggeRN
    Ah, keep calm and carry on? That look? Yeah it takes time...I work with kids and they need to know it will be ok (even high school kids)......so you learn but I am not the master of it for sure!

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