NO LUNCH

  1. 0
    Dealing with "no lunch" alot. Unit manager says it's an ER, sorry. There is no system to allow for lunch like flex or float RN. Unit manager just blows us off. I know some days are too busy, but between call backs and STD/culture call backs never get lunch. Starting to **** everyone off our "lunch" is last on list of "things to do". any ideas or thoughts?
  2. 20 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Can you all devise your own system for covering each other patients? Perhaps 2-15min breaks instead of a straight 30?
  4. 0
    Same here! I know exactly how you feel. It's funny because before I became a nurse, I would hear nurses saying they're too busy to even eat and I told myself that would never be me. To my surprise, that is my fate. I never get any lunch nor breaks. No 15 min breaks or 30 min breaks. Keep in mind I work 12 hr shifts. Sometimes I feel like they consider it a privilege. We don't have a float nurse either and we are a very busy ED. Nobody seems to care if anyone ate or not, if you ask someone if they can give you a break (charge nurse or fellow nurse) they look at you funny and they say "why don't you just eat your food at the desk?" That seems to be working fine for them but I'd like to spend my 30 min break uninterrupted. I don't know what to do! Any suggestions?? Sigh. Just venting.
  5. 0
    If your manager can't provide coverage by sitting at your station, go to the CNO and complain, although that will mostly fall on deaf ears. Gotts find a way to have your fellow nurses cover you, even if it is for 10 minutes to scarf down half a PB&J. Unfortunately, we are our best friend and advocate, if we don't look out for each other, no one will!

    It's busy season, and a lot of us will burn out. Take care of yourself!
  6. 6
    Claim "no lunch" every day you work without lunch and get coworkers to do the same. Complain above unit manager. The issue at your job is a culture issue, not an ER issue. Occasionally I do not get a lunch break but that is always the exception, never the norm.
    canoehead, VICEDRN, CherylRNBSN, and 3 others like this.
  7. 7
    I agree with hiddencat. It is NOT acceptable. It violates every principle of management and nursing ethics too BTW. Are we allowed to treat each other any less than we treat our patients? Taking care of yourself so you can better take care of your patients is ethical behavior. I would notify HR and research labor laws in your state. My state requires 30 minutes of lunch for more than 5 hours of work. You could just file a complaint at the state level. Personally I can't function without food and this would be a deal breaker for me. Do you work 12.5 hours for 12 hours of pay? This includes .5 hour lunch break, so you are working .5 hour unpaid, which is illegal and unethical. OK, getting off the soapbox.. Good luck.
    canoehead, VICEDRN, janhetherington, and 4 others like this.
  8. 8
    Management has no idea what REAL $$$ this could cost them. ER personnel have gone to the Dep't of Labor w/just that complaint. Result: feds and state came in, fined the hospital a LOT of money; people were compensated for their missed breaks, and the managers found ways to get people out on breaks.

    This actually happened @ a local hospital. You (and the people you work w/) have to willing to file a grievance, and do some homework w/a lawyer re: labor laws and such, but you have a very legitimate complaint, and, if you want it to change, you can do something about it.

    Best of Luck!
  9. 1
    i could care less about punching "no lunch". have never done it, it's the principle. work 12 hour shift with no lunch. watch charge nurse go home after 8 hour shift or pt complain about their lunch. don't want to cause fuss and get bad name but this is getting out on control. brought it up last year in 3 unit meeting with two seperate meeting with unit manager. any thoughts. worried about getting bad name.
    CherylRNBSN likes this.
  10. 3
    Forcing them to pay you for missed lunches is one of the ways to "make it their problem". You need to talk to your coworkers. If it's just you raising concerns, best case is they stop deducting your lunch break from your pay (ie they stop stealing from you). If your coworkers get on it too, you might start getting staffing and support to take your break. And if you guys decide to do a class action lawsuit you could get back pay to reflect all those lunches they've stolen from you.
    canoehead, KelRN215, and noyesno like this.
  11. 0
    There was a big thing here about that. State laws govern the rest periods that people get.

    Here's a link:
    U.S. Department of Labor - Wage & Hour Divisions (WHD) - Minimum Paid Rest Period Requirements Under State Law for Adult Employees in Private Sector - January 1, 2013

    Also, is there a union you can ask for help?


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