How can you say you're not paid well? - page 6

Could someone please explain to me why the nurses are complaining that they're not being pad well. In case my math is wrong this is the figure that I come up with. 3 day/12 hour shift at average... Read More

  1. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from malusport
    Could someone please explain to me why the nurses are complaining that they're not being pad well. In case my math is wrong this is the figure that I come up with.

    3 day/12 hour shift at average $28/hr in New York

    12 hours *$28=$336 per day*3 days $1008 per week* 52 Weeks that's $52,416 per year......that's just the average in New York. If you do 4 days you pull in almost $70,000.

    So, what the all the complaining about not getting paid? I just don't understand.

    Am I missing something?

    Aaron

    PS: I didn't even include any sign on bonus or night differential pay.
    My son has asked me a number of times over the years what I get paid and I resisted telling him, since I didn't think he had the frame of reference to understand. Finally, I sat down with him and a copy of our household budget and first explained how much our standard of living costs to maintain. In that light, our household income doesn't sound like the pot of gold it would be if it were all disposable income, like he thought it was before he understood exactly how much is spent on bills and living expenses. Your question reminds me of his. You really don't seem to have the frame of reference to understand why many of us believe that we're underpaid. It is a matter of considering the level of education and skill we bring to our work, the value of what we do, and where we fall on a scale with our similarly educated peers. It isn't that we're not being paid a living wage. It is that we're not being paid what we're worth, taking all things into consideration. It doesn't seem to me that you've done that.
  2. by   *PICURN*
    I thought the EXACT same way when I first started nursing school, and up until I started as an RN....

    Here in CA I'm making between $25-29/hour depending on the weekend/night differential. I thought WOW I AM GOING TO BE RICH!!!! Especially when compared to what I was making as an aide.....all throughout school I was thinking WHY are all these nurses complaining?!?!?!?!?!

    Well.....after my first day orienting in the PICU as a new grad, my thinking definately changed. I thought "wow...i am earning EVERY last dollar". Then my thinking changed even MORE when I got my first paycheck...."WHO THE HECK IS OASDI!?!?!?!.....whats this "agency fee" OH and btw we have to pay $52/month for PARKING!!!!" well you get the picture. It didn't really hit me and I didn't really realize what all the huffing and puffing was about until after my first two weeks of working as an RN.
  3. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from lifeLONGstudent
    "Could someone please explain to me why a physician can make a 6 digit-plus salary and the nurse who is the next highest level of education in the hosptial only starts out a couple of dollars higher the the cna's or the nurse techs. "



    Sorry to bust up the pity party, but I must chime in.

    Doesn't PT have masters degrees and pharmacy is now a doctorate compared to most of the 2 yr associate ADN nurses (majority of the nurses are ADNs at my hospital where I have worked for 11 years - I would say that less than 20% have BSNs). Also, I know that the majority of the medical TECHNOLOGISTS who work in the lab have 4 yr college degrees, usually a biology major and a chemistry minor. There are some 'techs' that only have a 2 yr associate, but they are called medical technicians and, overall, they represent only about 10-15% of the 'med techs'. I know because I am a medical technologist.... and btw, we are called 'med techs' but not in the sense that you define a 'tech', for example, a 'monitor tech'. .. and for God's sakes, please don't call us (the med. techs) phlebotomists. We worked hard for our BS degrees and it is a put down when you make that faux paux (spelling?). It is equivalent of me calling you (a NURSE) a 'clerk' - see my point?


    I guarentee you that the salary for a medical technologist (4 yr Bachelors degree) doesn't start out at what a nurse (2 yr associate) starts at and we sure don't get any of the nursing perks (higher pay, sign on bonus, call pay, charge pay, bonus for additional shifts, etc, etc, etc). And if it is about responsibility, I can kill a patient in the blood bank as fast as you can at the bedside.


    I am not knocking your profession. I am just fed-up with being abused in the lab for absolutely NOTHING and, hence, am going into nursing (among other reasons). At least in nursing, you are (better) compensated and you have more choices available to you.


    Just wanted you to hear/read the other view and realize that nurses aren't the only ones that get dumped on, get no respect, are overworked and underpaid, are under-appreciated, don't get good benefits, yada, yada, yada.


    Looking for my oxygen mask as I begin my descent down the soap-box ladder,
    lifeLONGstudent
    You know what, though? This is a nursing forum, so surprise surprise, we discuss things of concern to us. Not because we don't believe that others have it rough, too. Not because we don't think that there should be forums available for other people to go and vent about the inequities they face. Just because it is nice to share OUR frustrations with OUR peers.
  4. by   RNKPCE
    Don't you agree that there are some days when you couldn't be paid enough to do what you do.? When you have a patient crashing and another patient wanting water added to their flower vases and the man down the hall pulling out his IV and the mutiple family members calling to see how their "mom" is, the aide who keeps disappearing, and you are having trouble reaching a doctor for the patient who is crashing. On these days I wish I could just leave and go home. No amount of $$$ is worth that stress. You become an expert at prioritizing but still you feel like it isn't worth it. Fortunately those shifts are far and few between.
  5. by   live4today
    Quote from *PICURN*
    I thought the EXACT same way when I first started nursing school, and up until I started as an RN....

    Here in CA I'm making between $25-29/hour depending on the weekend/night differential. I thought WOW I AM GOING TO BE RICH!!!! Especially when compared to what I was making as an aide.....all throughout school I was thinking WHY are all these nurses complaining?!?!?!?!?!

    Well.....after my first day orienting in the PICU as a new grad, my thinking definately changed. I thought "wow...i am earning EVERY last dollar". Then my thinking changed even MORE when I got my first paycheck...."WHO THE HECK IS OASDI!?!?!?!.....whats this "agency fee" OH and btw we have to pay $52/month for PARKING!!!!" well you get the picture. It didn't really hit me and I didn't really realize what all the huffing and puffing was about until after my first two weeks of working as an RN.
    Aint "reality" a bummer?
  6. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from batmik
    Don't you agree that there are some days when you couldn't be paid enough to do what you do.? When you have a patient crashing and another patient wanting water added to their flower vases and the man down the hall pulling out his IV and the mutiple family members calling to see how their "mom" is, the aide who keeps disappearing, and you are having trouble reaching a doctor for the patient who is crashing. On these days I wish I could just leave and go home. No amount of $$$ is worth that stress. You become an expert at prioritizing but still you feel like it isn't worth it. Fortunately those shifts are far and few between.
    I agree with all of your post except that last line. Those shifts are all too frequent for some chronically understaffed facilities.

    There ought to be some kind of compensatory pay for nurses who have to work in understaffed conditions, really, don't you think? It's so hazardous to the patient's and nurse's health to have to work like that.

    Or maybe in the case of a call-off, the staff who does work should split the pay of the one who called out if no replacement was found?
  7. by   jnette
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I agree with all of your post except that last line. Those shifts are all too frequent for some chronically understaffed facilities.

    There ought to be some kind of compensatory pay for nurses who have to work in understaffed conditions, really, don't you think? It's so hazardous to the patient's and nurse's health to have to work like that.
    Couldn't agree more.
  8. by   hospitalstaph
    Quote from malusport
    Could someone please explain to me why the nurses are complaining that they're not being pad well. In case my math is wrong this is the figure that I come up with.

    3 day/12 hour shift at average $28/hr in New York

    12 hours *$28=$336 per day*3 days $1008 per week* 52 Weeks that's $52,416 per year......that's just the average in New York. If you do 4 days you pull in almost $70,000.

    So, what the all the complaining about not getting paid? I just don't understand.

    Am I missing something?

    Aaron

    PS: I didn't even include any sign on bonus or night differential pay.
    Is 70,000 a year a livable salary for someone in New York?? I would be surprised if you could support a family on that. My hubby makes about 65,000 a year but with three kids it is often very tight, and we live in the midwest.

    Believe me I am not at all trying to add to the debate I am just wonder how much 70,000 really is when you figure in the cost of living in NY.

    Tracy
  9. by   KarafromPhilly
    Quote from BabyNurse513
    Do you actually live in New York? Becuase I do and 52K, even 70K, is not a lot of money and I am single with no kids!! You forgot to factor in the union dues, NY State tax, New York City Tax etc. which came to $977.21 on my last paycheck.
    Do you have any concept of how much rent is in Manhattan?? Even for a small one room studio in a nice part if the city that is 2 weeks of your paycheck. That is before utilities and other expenses etc.
    I work in the biggest NICU in Manhattan, see the sickest babies and I am not up for working another day per week after being on my feet for over 12 hours working my a** off.
    my little sister lives in Brooklyn, in a one bedroom 3rd floor walk-up--about 500 sq. feet--she pays $1250 a month. I was interested in working in Manhattan but when I found out what they pay nurses there, I LAUGHED OUT LOUD.





    i
  10. by   mercyteapot
    I have a friend who lives with her boyfriend in Manhattan. She describes their 1 BR as being in a 'not great" neighborhood, and they pay a whooping $4K a month! When I think of the kind of house a $4K mortgage would afford me, here in real estate crazed San Diego, the thought of paying that amount of rent every month seems unbelievable. Even if my salary were tripled, I couldn't swing it!
  11. by   BeachNurse
    I agree that the OP should work as a nurse and then decide. I make less than $25/hr, but I work 9-5 hours, M-F, no nights, holidays, weekends, or call. None of my patients are critically ill. About the biggest risk I have is that I draw blood on HIV+ patients. This is the line of work I have chosen, and I feel that for having an Associate's degree I make pretty good money. I work on weekends occaisonally for an agency to make up my pay. I do home health at night (the pt. is sleeping all night usually and I don't do too much). Can't beat getting $21/hr. to do nothing but chart,monitor, and clean equipment.

    I feel that people who want to become nurses should investigate the salary before going to nursing school. If the money isn't enough then they should choose a different field. Unless someone is forcing you into nursing, you DO have a choice.
  12. by   RNKPCE
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I agree with all of your post except that last line. Those shifts are all too frequent for some chronically understaffed facilities.

    There ought to be some kind of compensatory pay for nurses who have to work in understaffed conditions, really, don't you think? It's so hazardous to the patient's and nurse's health to have to work like that.

    Or maybe in the case of a call-off, the staff who does work should split the pay of the one who called out if no replacement was found?

    I am fortunate to work in a facility that already had met the new state ratios in California before they were implemented. Even still my unit has increased their beds in the last year and we have been running full capacity these past few weeks. The other night we were 6 nurses short, they only had 4 scheduled. I have heard horror stories from nurse from other facilities. Some have even said that a bad night where I work is like a good night at their old hospital. That is why I have never left.

    I would love if they gave premium pay when we are understaffed but that will never happen. At my friend's hospital you get 1.5 times pay if you come in on your day off with less than 24hr notice( no one ever agrees to come in extra until it is within 24hrs). At that rate I would be more likely to work extra.
  13. by   *PICURN*
    Quote from BeachNurse
    I agree that the OP should work as a nurse and then decide. I make less than $25/hr, but I work 9-5 hours, M-F, no nights, holidays, weekends, or call. None of my patients are critically ill. About the biggest risk I have is that I draw blood on HIV+ patients. This is the line of work I have chosen, and I feel that for having an Associate's degree I make pretty good money. I work on weekends occaisonally for an agency to make up my pay. I do home health at night (the pt. is sleeping all night usually and I don't do too much). Can't beat getting $21/hr. to do nothing but chart,monitor, and clean equipment.

    I feel that people who want to become nurses should investigate the salary before going to nursing school. If the money isn't enough then they should choose a different field. Unless someone is forcing you into nursing, you DO have a choice.
    I agree. I can't think of another job where you can make that kind of $$ straight out of school with your Associate's Degree, with that kind of job stability.

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