Non-nursing major graduate wants DNP! - page 2

i am graduating from the university of iowa next year with a non-nursing major. i have planned to apply to an entry-level msn program, but by the time i graduate from that (2015) it will be required... Read More

  1. Visit  leenak profile page
    0
    Is your goal to be a NP or is it just to say that you have a doctorate? As I understand it, current MSN-NPs will be grandfathered in but schools just won't have that as an option.

    If your goal is to be a NP, then apply to the entry level MSN-NP programs. If your goal is to have a doctorate, then I'd say go for a ABSN program. Once you have your BSN, you can work and evaluate DNP programs for NP as they become available. I was looking at the UMaryland website and they do say that they plan to have a MSN-DNP for current MSN-NPs that are interested.

    I used to joke that my goal was to have as many Masters as possible without having a doctorate but looks like the NP transition will mess that goal up for me. I have one Masters and was working on my second one when I dropped out to start nursing school pre-reqs.
  2. Visit  knightr4 profile page
    0
    My understanding is that the 2015 deadline requiring the DNP for nurse practitioners is not expected to actually go into effect. Seems like a good idea to get the DNP eventually but, if its not going to be required, the fastest route to being a NP would be a direct entry MSN program, that is a masters degree for someone with a non-nursing BA. Seattle University has a program that I have been looking into. Heres the link

    College of Nursing - APNI - Primary Care Nurse Pracitioner - Family, Psychiatric, Adult-Gerontological Specialties - Seattle University
  3. Visit  OneDNP profile page
    0
    The 2015 rule for DNP degrees simply means that the minimum entry to practice for APRNs will be doctoral rather than master level. It does not mean if you are currently an NP or in an MSN-NP program that you have to get a DNP by 2015 to continue practicing or sit for boards. It also does not mean if you want an MSN in education or administration that you have to have a DNP to teach or manage. This happened with pharmacy in 1995 If you graduated from pharmacy school in 1994 or prior, you could be a master-level-trained pharmacist. If you graduated from pharmacy school in 1995, your program would have to have been doctoral level in order to sit for boards. There are plenty of masters level pharmacists practicing with the same scope-of-practice as their doctorally prepared counterparts (though likely making less money if years of experience are close). This is currently happening with physical therapists, but I think they have until 2017 to implement the DPT and phase out the MPT.
  4. Visit  kshiggin profile page
    0
    I am in the same exact situation Ashley except different part of the country. I go to school in Massachusetts and was planning on applying to entry level MSN programs to become and NP. Now with knowledge of the 2015 switch to DNP I am at a loss. I too have been debating whether to go into a ABSN program and then go into a DNP program or if I want to continue moving forward and getting an MSN prepared RN and taking it from there.
    I know this question is a year old but if anyone has any suggestions for me that would be great! I have all the prerequisite courses and I am a Junior currently.
  5. Visit  UVA Grad Nursing profile page
    2
    There is no requirement for the DNP in 2015. It was a proposed goal set by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing in 2006. It was a "stretch goal" as AACN did not have any ability to mandate this of the 50 states and national certification boards.

    No State Board of Nursing is requiring the DNP. The only certification agency that has endorsed the DNP is the national certification board for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA), and they set 2025 as their mandatory date.
    elkpark and chare like this.
  6. Visit  gettingbsn2msn profile page
    1
    Be very careful. I am working with nurses who are over 100k in student loan debt. Very difficult to get out of. I see a lot of depression with these nurses. They cannot buy homes, cars or have kiddos. Something has to be done. I am paid off, but then college is getting pricier and for no good reason other than they can!
    AshleyPCA likes this.
  7. Visit  BostonFNP profile page
    0
    Quote from kshiggin
    I am in the same exact situation Ashley except different part of the country. I go to school in Massachusetts and was planning on applying to entry level MSN programs to become and NP. Now with knowledge of the 2015 switch to DNP I am at a loss. I too have been debating whether to go into a ABSN program and then go into a DNP program or if I want to continue moving forward and getting an MSN prepared RN and taking it from there. I know this question is a year old but if anyone has any suggestions for me that would be great! I have all the prerequisite courses and I am a Junior currently.
    Look for quality direct-entry masters programs. There are several local.
  8. Visit  AshleyPCA profile page
    2
    Go with the accelerated BSN! I am now almost graduated with my BSN just two years after graduating from Iowa with my first BA. I'm so glad I went this route because now I can begin applying for direct BSN-DNP programs. Its been rough though, no social life or ability to work as much as you may need to, but its all been worth it to me knowing I'll be done in just a couple months from now. I'd suggest looking into a program like mine, its a program requiring nursing pre-reqs and all that, but because I had a previous BA they allowed me to squeeze right into this cohort's third year. So I am getting my BSN in 2 years. Not sure if other schools will allow that but its worth a shot! Look into other accelerated BSN programs as well.
  9. Visit  sweetdreameRN profile page
    1
    Ashley, You have to be licensed as a registered nurse to get into any NP or DNP program. There are foundations of nursing and basic nursing skills you will learn in nursing school. Also, you need clinical experience as well. Rookie RNs who jump into NP school struggle... badly. Good luck with your decision. I know its difficult to make an educational U-turn, but it is totally worth it. Nursing is a very rewarding profession with few educational boundaries.
    ICUman likes this.
  10. Visit  AshleyPCA profile page
    1
    Thank you for the advice. But along with that, its true that you should not just jump right into NP school right after graduating as a rookie nurse. Thankfully, I do not plan to do so. Most programs here in Minnesota actually require a few years nursing experience anyway. So I won't be jumping right in to a graduate program this fall. Insted , I plan to work and gain experience in the specialty I plan on going to grad school for.
    sweetdreameRN likes this.
  11. Visit  Ellie.D profile page
    0
    Quote from StangGang92
    First of all, the 2015 DNP IS NOT required. U of I has switched their program to a DNP rather then a MSN, but there is no law saying that all NP's have to have their doctorate in 2015.

    Think of the MSN vs DNP much like ADN vs BSN. People always talk about ADN's being phased out, but never have and most likely won't be. However, many places prefer a BSN to an ADN. So in short, you could practice with your MSN, but many places will prefer a DNP as they become more popular.

    Allen offers MSN programs, but I think they are in Waterloo or Cedar Falls? I'm not sure if they are direct-entry though.

    I agree with the above poster about not wanting my nurse practitioner to not have gone through nursing school.

    My advice, go to Kirkwood and get your ADN, then enter an RN-MSN program. Kirkwoods waiting list isn't too bad as long as you have prereqs done. A girl I went to high school with got into their ADN program the fall after she graduated. She had done so many of her pre-reqs while in high school and finished up the rest the summer before she started the program.
    This is an older thread but Kirkwood nursing program has been in the tank for several years. They change deans about every 2 years. They have some good instructors but the best seem to get hired away to the University. Kirkwood is a great community college except the nursing program. Since they have trouble keeping instructors, they cater to them at the expense of the students. Many instructors are rude, condescending and hateful. Besides the curriculum is a mess, tons of conflicting info, disorganization, and lack of respect for students. You will jump through all their meaningless hoops to the point of exhaustion while teaching yourself. It felt more like military boot camp than education.
  12. Visit  IsabelK profile page
    0
    Um...pre-med is not going to prepare you for all the aspects of nursing that will come up. I'd hesitate to see an NP, particularly a new NP, who had never worked as a bedside nurse and learned critical assessment skills prior to becoming an NP. I started as an aide, picked up the LPN halfway through my ASN program, worked as an RN, got the BSN and MSN/ANP while I was working as an RN full time. Then got the DNP while working as an ANP full time. Frankly, without the nursing hands on experience I don't think I'd have been an effective NP.


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