First day of CNA clinical - Elder abuse? - page 2

by stefanyjoy

Good afternoon everyone. I just need some perspective on what I witnessed today to see if I can expect to see this kind of thing everywhere. I'm not sure if I can handle it. This is going to be kind of long but I really just need... Read More


  1. 7
    Quote from leslie :-D
    ...once you become a cna and have a full assignment, i believe you will gain insight into much more, and will care for your pts the most efficient and respectful way possible...
    She's not going to be a CNA. She made sure to point out that she's taking the classes because she has to be on the registry in order to start the RN program. That, combined with all the melodrama and her mocking of the CNA's speech made me take this whole post with a grain of salt.
    CoffeemateCNA, *4!#6, loriangel14, and 4 others like this.
  2. 0
    OP - how did Day 2 go?
  3. 7
    I work LTC and I don't care how many residents the CNA has..that lady got poor care. We work short alot of times and some things get missed. Mouth care might be one of them, but it doesn't get missed for days at a time. Inct care gets done and above all...we let the residents be included in their care. If that means they get to pick the clothes they want or meal...so be it. I totally, totally understand the pressure the CNAs are under but this was neglect or abusive in a way.

    The transfer tech needs to be what PT/ OT listed. often times it is an order, so go by what is listed.
    azcna, nurse2beme, sharpeimom, and 4 others like this.
  4. 7
    stefanyjoy:

    I sense the consternation you must be experiencing at this time. You have adequately expressed your concern and have recieved some really good feedback with appropriate critiques and sound reality checks.

    Bottomline: You need to do what you believe and feel is the right thing to do. The majority, if not all, of us have experienced similar circumstances and have dealt with them the best we could. No matter what choice you make in dealing with this situation, this process will be a learning experience.

    Remember: This current situation is not the whole enchilada- it's only a piece of the pie. You will have world and time to digest this whole pie we call caregiving.

    Also be aware of the fact that you can only do what you can do when you are there for the patient. You have no power over what goes on in your absence.

    Finally, I'd like to leave you with this quote for you to consider in your decision-making process: "It is better to light a candle than curse the darkness."

    You've already begun to show your light. Do with the darkness as you so choose.

    May you find peace in your decision.

    Dave
    1feistymama, GrnTea, azcna, and 4 others like this.
  5. 0
    This sounds like a horrible facility, not some place I would ever work. The aide you worked with also sounds pretty bad, BUT its hard to judge them without knowing more about the situation from someone who has worked as a CNA and taken care of 7 or more patients/residents during the day for months or years. Some of the things the aide said are simply the harsh reality of being an aide, you only have so much time to spend on one person, so you may have to prioritize or other residents or patients will suffer. There is a HUGE difference between taking care of one person and taking care of 7, or on the evening shift, 10, or on the night shift maybe even 20 people.

    People are only willing or able to spend so much to take care of the elderly who need 24/7 care, so facilities have to make do with what they have. Lower income urban areas are probably generally going to have the worst nursing homes. I think nursing homes in remote rural areas tend to offer the best care, because everyone knows everyone. You will often be taking care of your cousin's wifes mother, or your neighbors father, or your former high school teacher etc. so the care tends to be better. Aides also have less places they can work, so getting fired from a job or having a bad reputation as an aide can haunt them. You may only have two nursing homes and one small hospital in the area, with employees at each who have worked at the other facilities, so if you were a crappy aide other potential employers will know it. At least thats my opinion. I've never worked in a big city and never want to.
  6. 0
    I wasn't there, so I don't know exactly why that CNA was behaving in that manner. I do know, however, from my own experience that LTC tends to be understaffed, and some of the NA who work there cut corners in order to finish their work.
    Many times, the quality of care suffers. That's the reality of long term care. That's why many residents appreciate it when students do our clinicals with them. We don't cut corners, and we make sure to treat them well.

    You did right to take care of her the way you did. Maybe it should have been made clear that you were supposed to care for that lady that day instead of the other CNA. I just want you to know that sometimes it is hard to always do what we're taught in school. When you begin work, you'll find that many residents refuse to have oral care. Dentures are very quick to clean. I can really do a decent job in 3 or 4 minutes. I can't give any legal advice, though.
  7. 11
    Oh my god people. Why are you all so timid about calling abuse ABUSE!!?? When you start out as a CNA student and you notice that everything is not all neat and tidy like it is in your text book and all your co-workers not all kind and happy and competent like you expect, it's quite a shock -- the answer is for the newbie to toughen up just a bit and roll up her sleeves and get to work being the best CNA she can be. Cutting corners here and there is NOT a good practice, but because of the workload of the average CNA it can sometimes become part of the routine to skip oral care once in a great while, or when you're pressed for time just dress the resident without giving him/her a choice of what outfit they want first. The LTC facility that I trained in made a very specific point of showing us videos and discussing at length what constitutes ABUSE and NEGLECT. Continuing education is also a requirement for every CNA at that facility and training about what abuse and neglect really is was also very clear and specific. Treating a person roughly when performing cares is ABUSE. Throwing a post-stroke patient around when transferring them is ABUSE. Preventing a fellow CNA from providing proper care is NEGLECT. Call it what it is, please, and don't be so quick to make excuses for co-workers that hurt people.

    Am I over-reacting? Perhaps. Nevertheless, if that were my grandma being treated as described by the OP, I would personally see to it that heads would roll, including the DON if she didn't put a stop to the abuse.
    Last edit by interceptinglight on Mar 2, '12 : Reason: added information cuz I'm angry
    Juniper248, GrnTea, Cessna172, and 8 others like this.
  8. 3
    I couldn't even get through the first paragraph; that so shameful and careless.
  9. 2
    Quote from interceptinglight
    I would personally see to it that heads would roll, including the DON if she didn't put a stop to the abuse.
    Op, you've described my Grandmother's experience to a T. It's just awful. And when LTC is understaffed, no reports are made. Our family told the DON about the unnecessary roughness and the very next day she "just so happened" to have 4 perfect crescent moon nail cuts on her forearm. Her experience haunts me almost daily. All anyone can do in that situation is just pray for a quick passing. It's awful, and it's why I'm studying to be a nurse.
    Last edit by HoT1 on Mar 2, '12
    sharpeimom and interceptinglight like this.
  10. 6
    Quote from interceptinglight
    Oh my god people. Why are you all so timid about calling abuse ABUSE!!?? When you start out as a CNA student and you notice that everything is not all neat and tidy like it is in your text book and all your co-workers not all kind and happy and competent like you expect, it's quite a shock -- the answer is for the newbie to toughen up just a bit and roll up her sleeves and get to work being the best CNA she can be. Cutting corners here and there is NOT a good practice, but because of the workload of the average CNA it can sometimes become part of the routine to skip oral care once in a great while, or when you're pressed for time just dress the resident without giving him/her a choice of what outfit they want first. The LTC facility that I trained in made a very specific point of showing us videos and discussing at length what constitutes ABUSE and NEGLECT. Continuing education is also a requirement for every CNA at that facility and training about what abuse and neglect really is was also very clear and specific. Treating a person roughly when performing cares is ABUSE. Throwing a post-stroke patient around when transferring them is ABUSE. Preventing a fellow CNA from providing proper care is NEGLECT. Call it what it is, please, and don't be so b to make excuses for co-workers that hurt people.

    Am I over-reacting? Perhaps. Nevertheless, if that were my grandma being treated as described by the OP, I would personally see to it that heads would roll, including the DON if she didn't put a stop to the abuse.
    AGREED. Now, it's true that a person has no idea what it's like to care for 10, 15, 20 residents at a time until they have to DO it. And it's true that sometimes, you have to prioritize and skip doing something until later, that you might not be able to change someone every 2 hours like you want to/should, and that corners will be cut, in general. But there is no excuse for some of these things. No matter how short or busy you are, there is no excuse for dehumanizing a resident. Period. These aren't breathing sacks of potatoes we're caring for, they're human beings, and should be treated as such.
    pnut8377, azcna, sharpeimom, and 3 others like this.


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