CNA VS LPN

  1. 1
    I currently live in the Philadelphia area and have been thinking about becoming a CNA or LPN. I attended school to become a medical Assistant and completed the program but was never able to obtain a job due to lack of experience. The trade school I went to promised to help me find a job but once I was done the program they were no help at all. I really would like to get into the medical field but fearful of the job market as well. I would hate to put thousands of dollars into schooling to not get a job. If anyone has any suggestions on which program would be best I would greatly appreciate it. I am a single mom looking for a way to support my family and im tired of woring dead end jobs .
    loveoverpride likes this.

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  2. 22 Comments...

  3. 0
    I am in Texas. The CNAs with whom I work start at $11 hourly and the LPNs start at $19 hourly. The CNA is a shorter training course but the LPN schooling will usually result in more earning potential.
  4. 0
    I see more CNA jobs in Philly than I do LPN. Most LPN jobs I see are in nursing homes and not hospitals. But is LPN going to eventually phase out of the job market? As a new grad LPN with no medical experience,are my chances much slimmer on finding a job?
  5. 0
    Have you thought about BSN programs??? It may be pricey, however, the long term benefits outweighs the short term, speaking as a former LPN-now BSN. The job market may be hard for nurses in the area, especially for the LPNs. I returned to school due to my Magnet hospital not hiring LPNs, and this was seven years ago; I was able to find employment elsewhere and enjoyed being IV therapy and PICC line competent, trach and vent certified, and wound care certification ready. The facility where I work has LPN students rotating, and the jobs are limited, due to the over saturation of nurses in the area. With that sobering reality check, lol, If I was in your position, I would look into obtaining a CNA, then look into part-time BSN programs, depending on taking required coursework prior to the major classes. I went to LaSalle University's program, which allowed me to work during the day, two days of evening classes, and clinicals on the weekends. It took me 2.5 years to complete, with a few required courses I had to take. It was worth it. I am starting a job in February after passing the NCLEX in June-but well worth the wait! I was able to land a position in a hospital I always wanted to work for. The BSN gets you through the door and your CNA experience will get you the job...hospitals and organizations love if you are comfortable around patients, families and healthcare peers! Just do due diligence in your choices and remember you work-life balance. I had single moms, return to school and young college students in my class...and the ones who were able to get through our program passed the NCLEX the first time and are working-and most of the single moms are in this group I'm talking about-they are my sheroes!! I hope this helps you out...make it work for you. Hope to see you out on the floor!!! 😄
  6. 2
    Quote from mz_tonep
    I see more CNA jobs in Philly than I do LPN. Most LPN jobs I see are in nursing homes and not hospitals. But is LPN going to eventually phase out of the job market? As a new grad LPN with no medical experience,are my chances much slimmer on finding a job?
    1. Most CNA jobs are not inside the hospital, either. You are far more likely to end up in a nursing home, home health, private duty, etc.

    2. This talk of the LPN being phased out has been a rumor since 1965, which was when the American Nursing Association released their famous position paper. Nearly 50 years later, the LPN has not been phased out. Rather, they've been displaced to less acute workplace settings (home health, private duty, psychiatric nursing, long term care, hospice, rehab, group homes, prisons, etc).
    Code Red and olufemi254 like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from LadyFree28
    Have you thought about BSN programs??? It may be pricey, however, the long term benefits outweighs the short term, speaking as a former LPN-now BSN. The job market may be hard for nurses in the area, especially for the LPNs. I returned to school due to my Magnet hospital not hiring LPNs, and this was seven years ago; I was able to find employment elsewhere and enjoyed being IV therapy and PICC line competent, trach and vent certified, and wound care certification ready. The facility where I work has LPN students rotating, and the jobs are limited, due to the over saturation of nurses in the area. With that sobering reality check, lol, If I was in your position, I would look into obtaining a CNA, then look into part-time BSN programs, depending on taking required coursework prior to the major classes. I went to LaSalle University's program, which allowed me to work during the day, two days of evening classes, and clinicals on the weekends. It took me 2.5 years to complete, with a few required courses I had to take. It was worth it. I am starting a job in February after passing the NCLEX in June-but well worth the wait! I was able to land a position in a hospital I always wanted to work for. The BSN gets you through the door and your CNA experience will get you the job...hospitals and organizations love if you are comfortable around patients, families and healthcare peers! Just do due diligence in your choices and remember you work-life balance. I had single moms, return to school and young college students in my class...and the ones who were able to get through our program passed the NCLEX the first time and are working-and most of the single moms are in this group I'm talking about-they are my sheroes!! I hope this helps you out...make it work for you. Hope to see you out on the floor!!! ?de04
    Thank you for your words of encouragement it means alot . If you dont mind Me asking did you start off at a local community college and obtain an degree from there first or did you go straight to bsn?
  8. 0
    If you are really tired of worrying about making enough money then I would certainly go for RN. You can get your CNA and work as an aide while you are in school working towards your RN. If you go for the associates degree you could start working sooner as a nurse compared to going for the bachelors degree.
  9. 0
    Quote from mz_tonep

    Thank you for your words of encouragement it means alot . If you dont mind Me asking did you start off at a local community college and obtain an degree from there first or did you go straight to bsn?
    Lol, I will try to sum up my lengthy education...I started off at a local community college. I found out what required courses I needed to take to get into a nursing program. After a few setbacks-including getting into the community college's program, not doing well, which made it no choice but to get my LPN in order to be able to re enter a RN program-I got an Associates Degree and transferred into a local University. The community college was more affordable for required coursework, and my college credits were transferable, and the Associates allowed me to not have to repeat required coursework if I needed to slow down or take a break-most science requirements are only good for 4-5 years if you don't have a degree, so that saved me a lot of money when I was accepted into the program. I had been out of school for five years by then.
  10. 0
    Quote from LadyFree28

    Lol, I will try to sum up my lengthy education...I started off at a local community college. I found out what required courses I needed to take to get into a nursing program. After a few setbacks-including getting into the community college's program, not doing well, which made it no choice but to get my LPN in order to be able to re enter a RN program-I got an Associates Degree and transferred into a local University. The community college was more affordable for required coursework, and my college credits were transferable, and the Associates allowed me to not have to repeat required coursework if I needed to slow down or take a break-most science requirements are only good for 4-5 years if you don't have a degree, so that saved me a lot of money when I was accepted into the program. I had been out of school for five years by then.
    I am actually going through a similar situation right now. I attended a local community college and didnt do soo great so now they are making me pay for classes out of pocket. Bayada Nurses actually hires ppl with no experience as a home health aide so I was thinking about doing that job and working an unrealted job ( not in the medical field) to help pay the cost to return to school. In this situation should o go the LPN route? Or should I continue to just get the RN ? It just make take long in my situation,due to the fact that I have to pay out,of pocket.
  11. 0
    Quote from mz_tonep

    I am actually going through a similar situation right now. I attended a local community college and didnt do soo great so now they are making me pay for classes out of pocket. Bayada Nurses actually hires ppl with no experience as a home health aide so I was thinking about doing that job and working an unrealted job ( not in the medical field) to help pay the cost to return to school. In this situation should o go the LPN route? Or should I continue to just get the RN ? It just make take long in my situation,due to the fact that I have to pay out,of pocket.
    Working for Bayada Nurses will be a plus. They do pay for schooling. I not sure what classes you have taken. Were the classes requirements for nursing school? LPNs are not getting any jobs, also, their tuition has quadrupled since I went to school, and the amount in financial aid will max out your limit, meaning you may be stuck with no job and having to pay back a loan-you will be delayed in obtaining that RN BSN.

    There are several RN programs that help you, such as New Courtland, LaSalle, Holy Family, etc. that can help you with work-life balance in the Philadelphia area. Find out what you need in general before you continue out of pocket. I had to pay out of pocket for several of my classes. I have to increase my science GPA by taking Excelsior College courses, which some programs accept. You have to do your research. Explore their nursing programs, plan what classes to take. I suggest do not take more than two a semester, since you have to pay out of pocket.


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