CNA Hours

  1. What are the typical CNA hours?
    I'm hoping to find out that they are similar to a nursing schedule of 3 12-hour shifts.
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  2. 20 Comments

  3. by   ecmb
    I think most are 8-hour shifts. (But I might be wrong.)

    I don't know if you'd want to be running for 12 straight hours. A CNA's job is pretty much "on-your-feet-all-the-time".
  4. by   TiggerBelly
    Depends on your faciltity. I work 12 hour shifts. Yea by hour 10 I may be ready to drop, but then I can have 3 days off in a row.
  5. by   FutureNurse23
    Well, starting this weekend. I will be working Sat & Sun 7a-7p and then 1 8hr shift Tuesday 3-11pm. Which is a total of 32hrs/wk. If ever I want more hours all I have to do is make a phone call. I'm sure after a 24hr weekend though I won't want to do anything but stay home,lol. The hours are great for school though. And that is my main purpose of having them.
  6. by   rancelumsden
    Yes, an 'it depends' answer. I'm in Chicago area. In my experience, LTC rarely does 12 hour shifts --- I only know of a couple of places that have this.
    Only hospitals do that, and not all of them participate.

    Remember, you get paid for 40 hours but only work 36 (with 12 hour shifts). The 'average' LTC simply cannot afford this. Hospitals, trying to attract people, will do this to compete for employees.

    Also, remember, it is generally mandatory that you will work every other weekend and many holidays. Of course, it depends on facility, and tenure, how that is worked out but in health care, you can pretty much kiss m-f goodbye...
  7. by   lizmatt
    I have noticed that more ltc's are offering 12 hour shifts & only for their "weekend program"

    in my experience ltc's offer 8's and hospitals can offer 12 - but there are many more cna ltc jobs available.
  8. by   ChristineN
    Quote from rancelumsden

    Remember, you get paid for 40 hours but only work 36 (with 12 hour shifts). The 'average' LTC simply cannot afford this. Hospitals, trying to attract people, will do this to compete for employees.
    I've worked at a couple different facilities, where staff worked 12's, and never have had heard of getting paid for the 4 unworked hours. It's always been work 3 12's, get paid for 36 hrs, but have the full-time benefits without doing a full 40 hrs.
  9. by   ChristineN
    I've only worked hospital, one hospital you could do any combination of 8's, 12's, or 16 hr shifts. At the other hospital, the staff all works only 12 hr shifts. The 12's aren't that bad though, IMO. I also prefer to work nights, were you aren't running constantly as mch, there is a little bit of down time.
  10. by   ampippin
    i have been a cna for 8 years. i have only worked in nursing homes. i have been at my current job for 5+ years. we have the option of working 8 or 12 hours. lately tho we have been working 16 every other day because we dont have enough help. our 8 hrs run 6am-2pm, 2pm-10pm, 10pm-6am, and our 12 hrs are 6a-6p, 6p-6a. cnas have a hard hard job. i am 33 yrs old and i feel like im 60. i work 6a-6p when im lucky. usually its 6am-10pm. i do have a husband and children but my place of employment doesn't seem to care. when we are told that we have to stay and we say we cannot, our job is threatened.
    i have been thinking of finding a new job but i am attached to several residents and dont want to leave. if i could find some info to bring to my employers attention i think i can get some action. my coworkers & i are exhausted.
    Last edit by jb2u on Feb 8, '12 : Reason: Seeking legal advice - TOS Violation
  11. by   ecmb
    Quote from ampippin
    lately tho we have been working 16 every other day because we dont have enough help. .

    i can't think that this is even safe - for you or for your residents.

    here is a perfect example where i think states should absolutely mandate standards, shift hours and also nurse assistant to resident ratio, that is reasonable.
  12. by   ampippin
    We even went to our Administrator and all she said was to please read out handbook concerning 'mandatory overtime'. It just seems like theres no one to turn to. No one who even cares.
  13. by   Shan25
    I just got a job working PRN in a hospital float pool. We have the option to work 4, 8, or 12 hour shifts.
  14. by   FutureNurse23
    Yeah, I work 2 12hrs and 1 8 and get full time benifits along with making time and a half for the 24hrs. And also get paid 40 dollars extra a week than I would working M-F.

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CNA Hours