Why does Pennsylvania seem to have so many more CRNA schools than any other state and

  1. does this create opportunities for those who want to be CRNA's. I am trying to convince my wife that we should move to Pensylvania at least a year BEFORE applying to a CRNA school because it has so many programs. My thinking is that this may qualify us for in state rates at some of the schools and give us a "leg up" on admission (if nothing else we will be a position to go to many interviews if invited without flying all over the country). Our state, Indiana doesn't have ANY programs so no matter where we would go to school (with the possible exception of UC) we would have to move. She is convinced that I am just trying to go to Philadelphia so that I can try every cheese steak in the city and that my "master plan" is probably flawed in some way that she cannot yet pinpoint (she actually starts to hum the theme song from Pinky and The Brain every time I bring the subject up).
    •  
  2. 30 Comments

  3. by   AnnaN5
    Quote from Roland
    does this create opportunities for those who want to be CRNA's. I am trying to convince my wife that we should move to Pensylvania at least a year BEFORE applying to a CRNA school because it has so many programs. My thinking is that this may qualify us for in state rates at some of the schools and give us a "leg up" on admission (if nothing else we will be a position to go to many interviews if invited without flying all over the country). Our state, Indiana doesn't have ANY programs so no matter where we would go to school (with the possible exception of UC) we would have to move. She is convinced that I am just trying to go to Philadelphia so that I can try every cheese steak in the city and that my "master plan" is probably flawed in some way that she cannot yet pinpoint (she actually starts to hum the theme song from Pinky and The Brain every time I bring the subject up).
    I think that if you plan on trying to attend a school in PA, moving there a year beforehand would be a good idea. I know many universities require you to live in the state for 1 year without going to school before you can be considered eligible for in-state tuition.
    You could also get well adjusted to the area well in advance of starting school so you wouldn't have to go through the 'shock' of a new place while starting the program.
  4. by   sprtbikegrlsv65
    i live in Ohio and i applied to a nursing program out there for this fall. I noticed that PA had a lot of RN school's without the waiting lists and so forth, so i'll be (hopefully) moving in July or August this year! Good luck with everything!
  5. by   nilepoc
    Graduate schools, do not typically have in state tuition, and you will probably find that many of the schools you would be applying to are private,and also do not have in state tuition.

    I would work more on my presentation, and interviewing skills, and not worry about where you are going to live. Besides, what if you got into a program somewhere elsen and not where you moved to. Two moves in two years would be expensive.

    Good luck.
  6. by   EmeraldNYL
    Yep, all of the schools in Philly that I am aware of are private and charge the same tuition no matter where you come from.
  7. by   SnowymtnRN
    I agree. It sounds like a good plan, especially to become established and comfortable with the area prior to starting the school.

    I didn't realize there were so many schools available in PA. Is there a website somewhere i could go look at for my DH? I thougth TX had the most schools, and i'm TRYING to avoid going back to TX if we can avoid it. TOO HOT!
  8. by   Roland
    If we moved to Pennsylvania we would probably only apply to Penn. schools (hence the potential reduction in travel for interviews). Also, I once asked a question similar to this over a year ago and one of the respondents indicated that in Tenn. some schools showed a preference for instate applicants. My feelings were that this may apply to some of the schools in Penn (speculation really). I will of course also seek to maximize our interviewing skills. I have already taken two speech classes and gone to numerous workshops on sales (I used to actually be in sales, but found that I often would talk my clients out of buying or into using a product better suited to their needs). Being more obsessive than Monk (as portrayed by Tony Schluba) I will spend an inordinate amount of time on every step in the process.
  9. by   NRSKarenRN
    accredited nurse anesthesia education programs: by state
    http://www.aana.com/coa/accreditedprograms.asp?state=pa


    psssst:
    bette m. wildgust, crna, ms, msn
    (crna educator)
    crozer chester medical center/villanova university nurse anesthesia program
    is on the accreditation board.
    program is just down the road from me. willing to meet with anybody attending program.


    our lady of lourdes in camden nj is only 20-30 min from philadelphia too with good reputation.

    pennsylvania has:
    diploma 22
    associate 23
    bachelors:33
    total: 78

    very strong education focus in our state, believe we graduate third most rn's/year behind california and ny state.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Feb 23, '04
  10. by   Roland
    Thanks, for the link I count ELEVEN CRNA programs in Penn. That's three more than I knew about. In addition, the University of Penn. is a state school and should offer an in-state rate (and possibly an edge for in-state applicants?). Thus, we could move to Pennsylvania, and apply to four or five schools each semester until we are accepted or until I die from cardiac arrest from eating too many cheesesteaks. My other concern is whether or not my Toyota with 300K miles could survive the Pennsylvania winters (not that Indiana is tropical). Another plus is that I could go on "ghost hunts" in Gettysberg PA.. In addition, the fact that some people simply won't apply to live in a really "seasonal" climate like PA may amount to another slight advantage for admission (I bet 50% of you folks in California would rather cleanse MERSA infected necrotic tissue with your gums than move into that sort of climate for two and a half years).
  11. by   SnowymtnRN
    Quote from Roland
    Thus, we could move to Pennsylvania, and apply to four or five schools each semester until we are accepted or until I die from cardiac arrest from eating too many cheesesteaks. In addition, the fact that some people simply won't apply to live in a really "seasonal" climate like PA may amount to another slight advantage for admission (I bet 50% of you folks in California would rather cleanse MERSA infected necrotic tissue with your gums than move into that sort of climate for two and a half years).
    :roll

    That's MY kinda rationale! LOL Thanks for making me laugh!!!!

    Also thanks for the link!
  12. by   pleasetakeme
    University of Penn is private and has no price difference for CRNA school for residents or non residents.. I also just got accepted there and I currently live in Georgia.. So not sure about edge with in state folks.. But would count for something I am sure.. I just cant wait for all the cold weather.. Hope to see you there... sue
  13. by   Roland
    That's a really nice thing to say! However, I suspect that if you "saw me there" and told anyone else that my tenure as a SRNA would be short indeed. It wouldn't surprise me if CRNA's schools are not implementing a "Roland watch list" in order to minimize the chances of letting me slip through the cracks. I expect to go to CRNA interviews and see copies of my posts on the walls that read "think, does this applicant fit this profile?" Then again I'm convinced that Russia, is just laying low waiting to relaunch the cold war at a time and place of their choosing (did anyone see Putin's press release a few days ago about being able to "beat" any SDI system we might deploy?)
  14. by   NRSKarenRN
    Quote from Roland
    the University of Penn. is a state school and should offer an in-state rate (and possibly an edge for in-state applicants?). ........(I bet 50% of you folks in California would rather cleanse MERSA infected necrotic tissue with your gums than move into that sort of climate for two and a half years).
    University of Penn is PRIVATE, IVY LEAGUE school =$$$$
    Penn State University is our state school=$$
    Both with tuition cheeper living in state.

    I've managed to live quite nicely for 48 years in Philly area.
    Only problem with living in some parts of California is missing out on FOUR SEASONS. PA has no mudslides, earthquakes, rare forrestfires; dependable reliable electricity; abundant good drinking water and our Philly cheesestakes. It all depends on your view of what good living is. :chuckle

close