What is a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice? - page 4

what is doctor of nursing practice (dnp) and doctor of nurse anesthesia practice (dnap)? what is the aana’s official position statement on doctoral education and where can i view it? the aana... Read More

  1. Visit  KalipsoRed21 profile page
    1
    I agree with 'elkpark' and 'aCRNAwannabe' on this issue. I got my BSN from a school that is apparently top notch yet after graduating and starting my first nursing position I felt like a fish trying to swim through sand. I started college late in comparison to the majority, and was able to go through my BSN and first 4 years of nursing with a good highschool buddy who was in his last 4 years of MD school and 4 year residency. I was able to compare our education in this manner and found my BSN to be woefully short on teaching me the basics of nursing and the guidance to have confidence to practice post graduation. I'm not going to say that my friend didn't struggle with confidence in his skills, but he struggled with that confidence the last two years of his medical degree and the first two years of residency when he had considerable professional resources still available to him and dedicated educational time to review his performance with is professors. I feel like I had to pick up everything I know on the fly and half-assed in comparison. Makes me regret the $50K I spend to get my BS Nursing degree. I spent more time with books and papers than I ever did with a patient or learning skills.
    I realize the science behind what we do is important. But if some insane nursing association is expecting us to pony up not just another $30K, but an additonal $60K for a doctorate in Nursing then the programs should include a very MD like school experience. I'm not saying that because I think nurses are MDs or a Phd in Nursing should be the same as a doctor. I'm saying that my BSN was a joke...I do/did not feel any better prepaired for my career than the ADNs I started nursing with. Lord knows a paid twice as much as those ADNs though.
    If an MSN and and Phd prepaired RN are going to measure up the same as an ADN does to a BSN then someone needs to take the stick out of their ass and realize that until the programs measure up to the degree that is being offered they really need to quit wasting our time, the patients time, the doctors time, and everyone's money with these stupid ideas of forcing everyone to get a worthless piece of paper when the same job can be done for less.
    Last edit by sirI on Jun 9, '12
    bmacks likes this.
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  3. Visit  subee profile page
    0
    Sounds like you are frustated by the limitations of the nurse practice act. Perhaps you would be happier as mid-livel practitioner but I don't know how to protect yourself from all the lousy programs around. Even our CRNA programs are slipping.
  4. Visit  edmia profile page
    1
    [QUOTE="KalipsoRed21"] feel like I had to pick up everything I know on the fly and half-assed in comparison. Makes me regret the $50K I spend to get my BS Nursing degree. I spent more time with books and papers than I ever did with a patient or learning skills."


    Completely agreed! BSN education is well, BS! Nursing theory? Really? Now that's a ridiculous subject altogether. We are practitioners of skills mainly and in some specialties, we need the SCIENCE to back up our practice. Science, anatomy, physiology, chemistry. Not "careative" theory of patient care! (instead of "curative" as in what physicians do-- yeah, that's nursing theory for you).

    I'm very glad I completed my ADN on a full scholarship (thank you brain) and now have an employer who is fully reimbursing my MSN education. Notice I said MSN? Yup. I found a program that takes me from ADN to MSN and bypasses a lot of the BS. Only catch? I won't be getting a BSN degree, just straight to an MSN and advanced nursing practice training (awwww, let me go cry over that terrible loss...) oh, wait! I forgot to say that I will be able to get a DNP by completing a dual advanced practice degree, so I will actually have relevant clinical experience behind my final nursing degree and only then will the medical establishment "allow and respect" my practice. More BS
    Last edit by sirI on Jun 9, '12 : Reason: quoted edited post
    Nurse2long likes this.
  5. Visit  mmm333 profile page
    0
    Please, please, please tell me what program you found that skips the "BS"-N. I already have two Bachelor's degrees. Is it Loyola? or another MSN program? I need to get started ASAP.
  6. Visit  edmia profile page
    0
    Quote from mmm333
    Please, please, please tell me what program you found that skips the "BS"-N. I already have two Bachelor's degrees. Is it Loyola? or another MSN program? I need to get started ASAP.
    There are many, I did a google search for adn to msn and went from there. It depends on what you want to follow as a specialty.

    This article also helped: http://www.bestnursingdegree.com/pro...rs-in-nursing/

    Good luck!
  7. Visit  manusko profile page
    0
    What MSN are you earning. What DNP will you end up with?
  8. Visit  subee profile page
    0
    What program allows you to become a CRNA without a BSN? And how about that ICU experience requirement? This is the CRNA forum.
  9. Visit  edmia profile page
    0
    Quote from subee
    What program allows you to become a CRNA without a BSN? And how about that ICU experience requirement? This is the CRNA forum.
    There are at least 2 crna programs that take rn's sans bsn. Google crna education and explore, the info is out there.
  10. Visit  wtbcrna profile page
    1
    A BSN is not a requirement to get into CRNA school, but a bachelors degree is.

    "Requirements

    The requirements for becoming a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) mainly include having a bachelor's degree in nursing (or other appropriate baccalaureate degree), Registered Nurse licensure, a minimum of one year acute care experience (for example, ICU or ER), and the successful completion of both an accredited nurse anesthesia educational program and the national certification examination. For more information about the nurse anesthesia profession and its requirements, please read the documents information below."
    Become a CRNA
    RNpearls1908 likes this.


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