Help: Tattoo Ideas!! - page 4

Okay guys....i just graduated from school and am a real CRNA now. I am very excited and proud to be doing what I'm doing. I was thinking lately of getting a tattoo related to medicine/anesthesia. ... Read More

  1. Visit  yeSICU profile page
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    I was under the impression that professionalism was not innate to CRNAs only. I will remember my place in the future, as just a nurse that is a CRNA wannabe... (just playing around a bit )
  2. Visit  Atheos profile page
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    Quote from jwk
    Re-read my posts, #4, #9, and especially #13.

    Clearly many of you see no problems with tattoos, visible or otherwise, in professionals. Fine. You have your opinion, I have mine. I'll just leave it with this...

    Here's what many of you want to argue and/or choose to ignore - when it comes to hiring, you don't get to make the decisions, and your opinion doesn't count. The only person whose opinion counts from an employment perspectice is the person who says "hire her", or "hire him", or "don't hire her" or "don't hire him. It's as simple as that. You can ramble on all you want about "it's my body, it's my right". Keep on ramblin'.

    Chances are, you probably won't even know why you weren't hired, even if you ask. There is no obligation for any employer to tell you why someone else was hired and you weren't. Like it or not, it's our call, not yours. It's that simple.

    Interesting.... Let's examine that in practice. I am the one responsible for hiring for my employer. I conduct the interviews. I utilize many methods of screening prospective employees, including personality screening and other tests. We spend a lot of money in the hiring process.

    So to the point...

    # of applicants rejected due to visible tattoos? 0
    # of applicants rejected due to incompatible/overly strong ideas/beliefs/attitudes: Too many to count.
    # of times personally rejected due to not covering a tattoo: 0

    While you can call my experience anecdotal your arguments would be the same.

    Like I've said before... This is 2008. Most people aren't as closed minded as others wish they would be. Any employer that is so closed minded about a visible tattoo probably is not that great of an employer. No decent interviewer or employer would pass on an excellent candidate solely because a tattoo. That's why major corporations only pass on heavily tattooed people that or over the top. There are also very few tattoos that could be covered by long sleeved t-shirts if need be.

    Just my opinion and
  3. Visit  cathys01 profile page
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    Quote from Stanley-RN2B
    No decent interviewer or employer would pass on an excellent candidate solely because a tattoo.
    I'm pretty sure the point JWK was making is that if you have TWO CANDIDATES and all else is EQUAL, the one with no visible tatoos is MORE LIKELY to be hired that the one with tatoos.

    That's it.
  4. Visit  zrmorgan profile page
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    Quote from Crux1024
    Did that rockstar graduate from an accredited school?
    oops...now I am guilty of rockstar discrimination! I guess it would be somewhat cool to have Roger Waters singing comfortably numb to you while you went under, assuming he went through the proper training.:spin:
  5. Visit  meyun06 profile page
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    Quote from jwk
    You won't like my answer...

    Professionals don't get tattoos. Of course if you want something cute on your butt, where no one else will see it, go right ahead.

    Yes, I know you want to "express yourself". Like it or not, visible tattoos, whether you think they're cute or not, give the appearance of being less than a professional. You're not working on the line at GM or flipping burgers at McDonalds.

    Ok I kind of agree, but it could have been said in a better way. I think it would be better to get the tattoo someplace else that's not so visible. Oh and congrads!!!!!!!! I want to be a crna too.:wink2:
  6. Visit  almostthere83 profile page
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    I am currently in nursing school and have almost sleeves. I did save some room though for the following words "Salve Sis" it means "may you be well" in Latin. I got it on my right forearm, first because I'm right handed, my forearm because I"m also a massage therapist and use my forearm for massage. And lastly because I do most of my care with patients using my right hand. I choose Latin because medicine in general is derived from Latin words. and I think thats about it. So maybe check in to quotes or sayings that interest you.
  7. Visit  Qwiigley profile page
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    This debate is as old as the abortion debate. You won't change anyones minds. They each have their own opinions.
    Personally, I don't think anything permanent on my body is a good idea.
    Once you have been an anesthetist for awhile, you will see what happens to the body, the parts of skin and the tatoos on them.
    Your body does not "grow" evenly. That once cute tatoo of a fairy, later looks nothing like it once was and many, many times it is UNRECOGNiZABLE as anything close to a fairy. But it is your body and it is your choice. Remember that.
    Don't be persuaded by current trends or what others say. Think for yourself.
    If you are in anesthesia school, I'm assuming you are smart enough for this task.
  8. Visit  Mamassage profile page
    1
    Quote from jwk
    You won't like my answer...

    Professionals don't get tattoos. Of course if you want something cute on your butt, where no one else will see it, go right ahead.

    Yes, I know you want to "express yourself". Like it or not, visible tattoos, whether you think they're cute or not, give the appearance of being less than a professional. You're not working on the line at GM or flipping burgers at McDonalds.
    The only reason tattoos are not yet considered professional is that professionals have only just begun to show theirs. There was a time when ear rings were for gypsies, make up for harlots and a shaved underarm was considered obscene.
    athena55 likes this.
  9. Visit  NOLA-ROB profile page
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    All I can tell you is wait at least 6 months to a year, and if you still want it go for it. But, I got a symbolic black ink tatoo on my ankle during college right after "hell week". After about four years it got old. Recently (8yrs later), I have spent close to $700 getting 8 "not so pleasant" laser tatoo removal treatments, and it is still not all the way gone. Just something to think about.
  10. Visit  TerpGal02 profile page
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    SOunds like the OP plans on getting work done in a place that is easily covered. Under a watch band sounds like? Honestly, I have NO issues with tattoo covered people. Many of them are my friends, in fact, we are GOOD friends with 3 or 4 tattoo artists, but for myself and my family, I think its best to keep them to places that can be covered while in the workplace. There IS still a stigma surrounding tattoos. My husband has quite a few VERY big tattoos that I paid for as Christmas/birthday gifts. I think they are beautiful, but I MADE him promise that anything he got could be covered by a short sleeved dress shirt. He has one REALLY small one on his forearm near the antecubital area, but if you weren't looking really close, you might just think its a big birthmark LOL! I do have one friend that is a pretty successful attorney and almost his ENTIRE body is covered, but he wears a suit everyday and you would NEVER know unless you saw him outside the professional setting. IMO, if you can cover it up with clothing while at work, its no big deal.
  11. Visit  Mommy_of_3_in_AL..RN profile page
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    The OP asked for ideas about what to get, something that is representative of their accomplishment and hard work, not a speech about the professionalism associated with it. I agree, sometimes it is hard to take a person seriously when they are inked all over, but it doesnt make them less of a professional or any less able to perform their job. I have two tattoos right now, and want another. However, i agree that you should wait a little while after choosing what you want and where to get it before you actually do it. Simply because what seems nice now, may not in as little as a few weeks. Make sure it is symbolic to you, and something that will still be symbolic in the future. I got my second on a whim..a purple playboy bunny on my bikini line..a few months later i was pregnant with my second child..a good many stretch marks later, and my bunny's ears are crooked..and i hate it. I want it covered, but will not do so until i am SURE of what i want to replace it.
  12. Visit  krzysiu profile page
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    Quote from SRNA11
    Okay guys....i just graduated from school and am a real CRNA now. I am very excited and proud to be doing what I'm doing. I was thinking lately of getting a tattoo related to medicine/anesthesia.

    I need help coming up with ideas.
    I was thinking of either a latin or greek word (want a small one on my wrist). Nothing long and fancy.

    I was thinking of the word: VIGILO (which is latin for vigilant).

    Any other words, symbols, or phrases you can think of for nurse anesthetists and what we do.

    any help would be awesome!!!
    As a big admirer of tattoos, unlike some who have responded, I'll try and offer advice. Mainly, don't rush into anything. Really research what you want and more importantly who you want to do it. Good tattoos are not cheap and become a real time commitment.

    However, in the end, you can truly get a piece of art that anyone will appreciate. I have had nothing but positives from patients who notice mine. It's an excellent ice breaker and conversation starter during a time when you see people that are extremely anxious or at their worst. Plus, if you're really worried about it, put your lab coat on. Your demeanor and professionalism will speak for itself and no one will think any less of you if you have a tattoo.

    Sure there will be a small segment of the population, more than likely not born in this century, that will not like tattoos. However, they have probably never seen a good one. There are artists out there can mimic the beauty of a priceless piece of art displayed in a museum. So, what is difference between it being displayed on a wall canvas or your arm? I dare these individuals to say they have never admired a painting and the such.

    I would like to start my second sleeve incorporating Hypnos and the AANA seal, Morpheus, Death, Saint Rene, with background use of poppy and other elements. Just tossing some ideas out there for you. Where are you from? Maybe I can help you find a reputable artist within your area? Hope this helps.

    Chris
  13. Visit  Qwiigley profile page
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    Well, I was born in this century and I don't think that tattoos are a good idea. I don't like to see exposed tattoos when I have a person taking care of me whether a waiter or a professional (especially). I will not hire a CRNA who has exposed tattoos. It is not professional. Buck the system and do what you want, but remember the opinion of the person giving you the job as well as the client is what is truly important if you want to make a living. Period.


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