Treatment of Agency Staff - page 5

This question comes up again and again. So my dear colleagues, let's take a poll and see where we are at with this question on this BB. How are you treated? Please feel free to cooment or explain... Read More

  1. by   Faby
    dear Nightngale: I didn't vote because I'm not sure about what is an agency nurse. Here in my country there aren't agency nurses but each facility has a certain number of nurses "on call", that is, when a nurse reports not to come to work beacuse of sickness or other reasons, one o these "on call" nurses is called. As she can be called even at the begining of the shift it is very common that she arrives one hour passed the shift beginning. So it is very tough to work with Pts that you don't know, and other staff members also unknown. Here the nurse is supposed to take in charge of a group of Pts (20 to 35) and guide a group of 4 0 5 other nurses with less educational level in the treatment of those patients. It is very hard to work in these conditions but everyone does until you obtain a permanent possition.
  2. by   nightingale
    Faby:

    Thank you for your input. It is interesting to hear how other places and countries are handling the nursing shortage.

    Here in the US, we used Agency nurses, sometimes regularly, at facilities. I think it is fair to say the more populated an area, the more likely it is that agency nurses are used frequently.

    Agnecy nurses may work on a contract basis for a period of time from 4-13 weeks or more; these temporary stafers are called travel nurses. There are also per diem agency nurses (I fall into this category) that work on a week to week baiss. The later, do nto have a guarantee of hours or schedule. The big plus with per diem scheduling, is you choose your own hours; big negative is the call off which can really vary.

    When you talk about 20-25 patients, is that for a medical or surgical floor or what? Yikes that sounds really hard!

    B
  3. by   Yankee in TX
    I think as agency I have definately had both the good & the bad. I do feel that most of the time I have been treated well. I have just gone " agency" since May 2002 and I was a staff Rn before that. I have worked with caring & competent agency nurses and very BAD ones but I can also say that for the "regular" staff. I think it is the person who is the nurse not the agency or staff title.
  4. by   nightingale
    I agree Yankee. It is the person who makes the nurse!

    B.
  5. by   wolfox
    I have worked agency both per diem and traveler and I would find it hard to cast a vote just because there is such variability from hospital to hospital and individual at the hospital. I have gotten dumped on regurlaly by certain indivuduals.

    It's not just a "matter of perspective" when I get assigned 5 patients with who are all PIH or post-op and have IVs, foley, PCAs, O2 and frequent vital signs and my coworker has 3 who are all routine post-partums with no meds and all they need is their fundus checked. It's not just a matter of perspective when that nurse won't even answer the call lights on my patients when I am engaged in patient care and she is sitting right in front of the call system and could just pick up the reciever and ask what they need.

    And it's not just a "matter of perspective" when this nurse denigrates agency nurses as being underqualified and overpaid.

    Now, maybe some nurses find it tiresome to hear about nurses who complain about their assignments. But how would you like to be the patient with an IV and an abdominal incision waiting 30 minutes to empty your bladder while a nurse sits reading at the nurses station? Or maybe the patient who has your jaw wired shut and is vomiting and needs the doctor called, meds, and your wires cut-which one nurse can't simultaneously do-while three nurses are sitting and chatting? Or perhaps you would like to be the 36 week pregnant patient with diabetes and hypertension who is going into labor on POSTPARTUM with a nurse who has 7 other patients because the labor and delivery nurse with NO PATIENTS has refused to take you and is sleeping at her desk????

    No, it's not all nurses or all hospitals-but it is NOT "just a matter of perspective" that some staff nurses dump on the agency nurses. And that you've got to speak up for your own liscence and patient safety.
  6. by   Jay Levan
    I am currently working with two exceptional crews and my experience with them is as others have noted here. I have been accepted as "One of the Crew", so much so that one of the facilities that has never offered a Contract to any nurse, is considering an offer to me, to work a contracted assignment. I am also Contracted at the other facility, the beauty of this dual assignment is that it will be through one agency and all hours over thirty-six will be payed to me as overtime. Add to this that I have full healthcare coverage, completion bonuses, and other bonus clauses and you may see some of the benefits of my work ethics, and expertise. Of course it helps greatly that there is a huge shortage of nurses. I am on the last turn of my career, heading for the finish line, and I can see retirement just around the bend, it is nice to know I will be a much needed commodity until that day rolls around :-)
  7. by   LIZZIE57
    I RECENTLY LEFT A MANAGEMENT POSITION AND HAVE STARTED WORKING FOR AN AGENCY WHO STAFFS MANY OF THE 221 FACILITIES IN RHODE ISLAND. I WAS DUMPED ON ONCE AND REFUSE TO RETURN TO THAT FACILITY. I EXPECT TO BE TREATED WITH THE SAME RESPECT THAT I WOULD GIVE TO ANY NURSE WHO COMES TO HELP. 34 YEARS OF NURSING HAVE LEFT ME WITH ENOUGH WISDOM TO SPEAK UP AND REFUSE TO BE TREATED OTHER THAN 100%!
  8. by   wolfox
    That's how it works out. The hospitals and staff members who are rude to agency nurses or who dump work eventually have a heavier work load themselves because no one wants to work with them. They have to keep retraining new agency or staff nurses to fill those positions or there is simply no one who will come in at all.

    I never turn down assigments and renew contracts where I am treated with respect and given an even patient load. I will specifically even refuse to work with certain individuals.

    I have that control over my own life as an agency nurse. Those who choose to resent me for having that type of control over my own life rather than to treat me as an equal will just have to live in their own little private h*ll of being chronically understaffed.
  9. by   Yankee in TX
    I worked at a hospital for almost 4 years around the corner from my home & I honestly could say that the agency nurses didn't get dumped on any more than the staff nurses. Unfortunately everyone was getting dumped on due to the management. The feeling was if you didn't like it leave. I am fortunate to be able to work part time so I did. But there are many who are "vested" who will stay because they need to. They are the backbone of the floor I used to work on.
  10. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by wolfox
    That's how it works out. The hospitals and staff members who are rude to agency nurses or who dump work eventually have a heavier work load themselves because no one wants to work with them. They have to keep retraining new agency or staff nurses to fill those positions or there is simply no one who will come in at all.

    I never turn down assigments and renew contracts where I am treated with respect and given an even patient load. I will specifically even refuse to work with certain individuals.

    I have that control over my own life as an agency nurse. Those who choose to resent me for having that type of control over my own life rather than to treat me as an equal will just have to live in their own little private h*ll of being chronically understaffed.
    WELL SAID!!! Took and snatched the words right out of my mouth!!
  11. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by wolfox
    I have worked agency both per diem and traveler and I would find it hard to cast a vote just because there is such variability from hospital to hospital and individual at the hospital. I have gotten dumped on regurlaly by certain indivuduals.

    It's not just a "matter of perspective" when I get assigned 5 patients with who are all PIH or post-op and have IVs, foley, PCAs, O2 and frequent vital signs and my coworker has 3 who are all routine post-partums with no meds and all they need is their fundus checked. It's not just a matter of perspective when that nurse won't even answer the call lights on my patients when I am engaged in patient care and she is sitting right in front of the call system and could just pick up the reciever and ask what they need.

    And it's not just a "matter of perspective" when this nurse denigrates agency nurses as being underqualified and overpaid.

    Now, maybe some nurses find it tiresome to hear about nurses who complain about their assignments. But how would you like to be the patient with an IV and an abdominal incision waiting 30 minutes to empty your bladder while a nurse sits reading at the nurses station? Or maybe the patient who has your jaw wired shut and is vomiting and needs the doctor called, meds, and your wires cut-which one nurse can't simultaneously do-while three nurses are sitting and chatting? Or perhaps you would like to be the 36 week pregnant patient with diabetes and hypertension who is going into labor on POSTPARTUM with a nurse who has 7 other patients because the labor and delivery nurse with NO PATIENTS has refused to take you and is sleeping at her desk????

    No, it's not all nurses or all hospitals-but it is NOT "just a matter of perspective" that some staff nurses dump on the agency nurses. And that you've got to speak up for your own liscence and patient safety.
    WHOAAA! YOU ARE AWESOME...and must have been working in some of the same places I have..:chuckle!
  12. by   Yankee in TX
    Sorry to digress from the subject but the sheer volume of nurses on this web site amazes me.
  13. by   nightingale
    20,000 and growing every day. Welcome to the Board TX!

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